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Syllabus Central

This feature provides annotated syllabi that offer creative approaches to teaching, with particular emphasis on innovative ways of organizing the U.S. Survey and integrating technology. Teachers reflect on how a social history approach, active learning techniques, and Web-based resources and new media have impacted their teaching and their students. Read our guidelines for information on submitting your own syllabus. For even more syllabus resources, try the Center for History and New Media Syllabus Finder, which can search thousands of syllabi in a range of subjects for keywords, titles, names, and quoted phrases.

There are 8 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 8 .


syllabus central
Course Portfolios for History 67, The United States to 1877 at Temple University
William Cutler.
Between the spring 1997 semester and the spring 2000 semester, Professor Cutler modified his survey course with the help of a fellowship from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement for Teaching. He designed a new, online syllabus; linked it to Web-based primary sources; and built in a feature allowing students to post work weekly online. Cutler documented the process in extensive course portfolios that describe how he conceived the course and what happened over the semester as he taught it. You can see how the course changed by beginning with the portfolio for 1996–1997, then reading the course portfolio narrative for 2000. Click on student reports to read examples of student writing assignments. Cutler is also the author of two articles on teaching U.S. history for the American Historical Association newsletter Perspectives; one appeared in 1997 and the other in April, 2002.
Resources Available: TEXT.

syllabus central
History 172—Early United States History
Troy Johnson.
This course, covering the first half of the traditional survey, was designed for undergraduates in an intensive teacher education program at California State University Long Beach. It combines previous courses in U.S. history and American Indian history into one fifteen-week course. The course focuses on the history of the United States through the lives of the people who created the new nation and the new society. Particular attention is placed on the interaction between Europeans, Americans, and the Native Peoples of the “New World.”
Resources Available: TEXT.

syllabus central
History 219 - History of American Women
Amy Richter.
This course, taught at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, moves through the chronology of American history to examine the broad themes that have shaped women’s lives in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Students investigate the ways in which notions of gender difference have changed over time and how a wide variety of women both created and responded to shifting and contested cultural, political, and social roles.
Resources Available: TEXT.

syllabus central
History 214U.S. History to 1865
Christopher Strangeman.
This course, taught at Shawnee Community College, organizes the first half of the survey thematically and uses primary documents, WebBoard communication, and frequent writing assignments. Students also participate in a variety of innovative activities designed to review and reinforce the material, from “seminar days” to mock games of Jeopardy!
Resources Available: TEXT.

syllabus central
History 122,The U.S. 1865 to 1990
Profs. Michael O’Malley and Suzanne Smith.
This course covers the second half of the U.S. History Survey and is taught at George Mason University (a public four-year university) by Professors Michael O’Malley and Suzanne Smith. This syllabus contains numerous online student exercises as well as online illustrated versions of many lectures, but no annotations.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.

syllabus central
American Civilization History
Dr. Carl Schulkin .
This course is offered at the Pembroke Hill School in Kansas City, Missouri, a private secondary school, and taught by Dr. Carl Schulkin. This is less a traditional syllabus than a series of daily assignment sheets posted so that students and their parents will have access to information about assignments twenty-fours a day, seven days a week.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.

syllabus central
Union Women’s Studies: History of Women Workers in America
Pennee Bender, Cornell University School of Industrial Relations.
This course serves members of New York City’s DC-37, a local of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. It is one offering in the union’s women’s leadership program. Beginning with the colonial era and ending with contemporary globalization, the course uses numerous videos to provide personal perspectives on large historical issues.
Resources Available: TEXT.

syllabus central
History 2025: Slavery and Freedom: American History from Revolution to Civil War and Reconstruction, 1750–1890
Ian Tyrrell, The University of New South Wales.
This annotated syllabus sheds fascinating light on the way U.S. history is taught and understood outside of the U.S. Primarily a lecture-based course for Australian students who know a great deal about American popular culture and very little about American history, the course also draws a handful of American students spending a semester or year abroad who seek, and find, a very different perspective on their own country’s history than they had previously encountered. The course has an extensive list of required and suggested readings, and every week includes readings that place the week’s topic in comparative and/or transnational contexts.
Resources Available: TEXT.