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Talking History

Over the past several years, History Matters has organized twenty-five online dialogues with leading historians and teachers about the the teaching of major topics in U.S. history--from early settlement to the Vietnam War. Those discussions are archived here and contain many useful teaching suggestions.

There are 25 matching records, sorted by date of forum. Displaying matches 1 through 25 .


talking history
Teaching the Civil Rights Movement
Charles M. Payne.
This forum was moderated by Charles M. Payne, Sally Dalton Robinson Professor of History, African American Studies, and Sociology, and Director of the African and African American Studies Program at Duke University. He is the author of Getting What We Ask For: The Ambiguity of Success and Failure in Urban Education; Debating the Civil Rights Movement, and the award-winning I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Movement. He is also co-editor, with Adam Green, of Time Longer Than Rope: African American Activism from 1850–1950. (October, 2003)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Teaching the U.S. Civil War
David Blight.
This forum was moderated by David Blight, Professor of History at Yale University. Blight’s most recent book is Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, 1863–1915 (2001), winner of numerous prizes, including the Bancroft Prize and the Frederick Douglass Prize for the most outstanding book on slavery, resistance, and/or abolition. He is also the author of Frederick Douglass’s Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee (1989); and the editor or co-editor of numerous books on the Civil War period, including Union and Emancipation: Essays on Politics and Race in the Civil War Era (1997). Blight has also written many articles on abolitionism, American historical memory, and African-American intellectual and cultural history. In addition to his career teaching at colleges and universities, he was for seven years a public high school teacher in his hometown of Flint, Michigan. (March, 2003)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Using Oral History to Teach U.S. History
Linda Shopes.
This forum was moderated by Linda Shopes. Linda Shopes is a historian at the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. She has worked on, consulted for, and written about oral history projects for more than twenty-five years. She is co-editor of The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History and is past president of the Oral History Association. She is also the author of “Making Sense of Oral History” in the Making Sense of Evidence section of History Matters: The U.S. Survey on the Web. (February, 2003)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
History of Early Settlement in the U.S.
Alan Taylor.
This forum was moderated by Alan Taylor, Professor of History at University of California at Davis. Professor Taylor specializes in early American history, history of the American West, and history of pre-Confederation Canada. He is the author of American Colonies (2001); William Cooper’s Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic (1995), winner of the 1996 Bancroft, Beveridge, and Pulitzer prizes for American history; and Liberty Men and Great Proprietors: the Revolutionary Settlement on the Maine Frontier, 1760–1820 (1990). He is currently working on a borderlands history of Canada and the United States in the aftermath of the American Revolution. (November, 2002)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Using Material Culture to Teach U.S. History
Laurel Thatcher Ulrich.
This forum was moderated by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History and Director of the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University. Her most recent book The Age of Homespun: Objects and Stories in the Creation of An American Myth (2001) explores the production and consumption as well as the social meanings of textiles in pre-industrial New England. She is also the author of the Pulitzer Prize winning A Midwife’s Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard Based on Her Diary, 1785–1812 (1991), Good Wives: Image and Reality in the Lives of Women in Northern New England, 1650–1750 (1982), and numerous articles and essays on early American history. Recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, she assisted in the production of a documentary film based on A Midwife’s Tale and her work is also featured on the website Do History. (October, 2002)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
History of Feminist Movements in the U.S.
Estelle Freedman.
This forum was moderated by Estelle Freedman, Professor of History at Stanford University. Professor Freedman specializes in the history of women, gender, and sexuality. She is the author most recently of No Turning Back: The History of Feminism and the Future of Women (2002), which draws on interdisciplinary feminist scholarship to explore the influence of feminism in the West and its relationship to broader movements for women’s rights and social change throughout the world. Other books include Maternal Justice: Miriam Van Waters and the Female Reform Tradition (1996), Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America (co-authored with John D’Emilio, 1997), and Their Sisters' Keepers: Women’s Prison Reform in America, 1830–1930 (1981). Professor Freedman has taught at Stanford since 1976; she has received the Dinkelspiel Award and the Rhodes Prize for Teaching and Service to Undergraduate Education, among others. (September, 2002)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Families in U.S. History Forum
Linda Gordon.
This forum was moderated by Linda Gordon, Professor of History at New York University. Professor Gordon has specialized in examining the historical roots of contemporary social policy debates, particularly as they concern gender and family issues. She is the author of America’s Working Women, orig. 1976, revised ed. 1995), Woman’s Body, Woman’s Right: The History of Birth Control in America (orig. 1976, revised ed. 1990), and Heroes of Their Own Lives: The History and Politics of Family Violence (1988). As a domestic violence expert, she serves on the Departments of Justice/Health and Human Services Advisory Council on Violence Against Women. She is the author most recently of Pitied But Not Entitled: Single Mothers and the History of Welfare (1994), The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction (1999), and Dear Sisters, edited with Ros Baxandall (2000), which offers an historical introduction to the women’s movement of the 1970s through essays and documents. (March, 2002)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Reconstruction
Eric Foner.
This forum was moderated by Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University. Professor Foner specializes in the Civil War and Reconstruction, slavery, and 19th-century America. His publications include Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party Before the Civil War (1970), Tom Paine and Revolutionary America (1976), Politics and Ideology in the Age of the Civil War (1980), Nothing But Freedom: Emancipation and Its Legacy (1983), Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863–1877 (1988), Freedom’s Lawmakers: A Directory of Black Officeholders During Reconstruction (1993), and The Story of American Freedom (1998). In 2000, he served as President of the American Historical Association. (October, 2001)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on U.S. History in Global Perspective
Thomas Bender.
This forum was moderated by Thomas Bender, University Professor of Humanities and Professor of History at New York University. He is also Director of the International Center for Advanced Studies at New York University. His publications include Toward an Urban Vision: Ideas and Institutions in Nineteenth Century America (1975) (winner of the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize of the Organization of American Historians), Community and Social Change in America (1978), New York Intellect: A History of Intellectual Life in New York City, from 1750 to the Beginnings of Our Own Time (1987), and “Wholes and Parts: The Need for Synthesis in American History,” Journal of American History, 73 (1986). For the past few years Professor Bender has been leading a collective effort to rethink American history in the context of our awareness of globalization that will result in Rethinking American History in a Global Age, forthcoming in 2002. (November, 2001)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Religion
Christine Heyrman.
This forum was moderated by Christine Heyrman, Professor of History at the University of Delaware. Professor Heyrman is the author of Southern Cross: The Beginnings of the Bible Belt (1998) and Commerce and Culture: The Maritime Communities of Colonial New England, 1699–1750 (1984). She is also one of the co-authors of the textbook, Nation of Nations: A Narrative History of the American Republic (4th edition, 2000). Currently she is writing a history of Indians and Protestant and Catholic missionaries in the Old Northwest. (December, 2001)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Labor History
David Montgomery.
This forum was moderated by David Montgomery, Farnam Professor of History Emeritus at Yale University. He has taught the history of labor in the United States, Civil War and Reconstruction, surveys of U.S. history, and other undergraduate and graduate courses at the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Warwick (England), SUNY Buffalo, the University of Campinas (Brazil), and Oxford University, and he has received distinguished teaching awards at Pittsburgh and Yale. His books include Citizen Worker: The Experience of Workers in the United States with Democracy and the Free Market during the Nineteenth Century (1995), The Fall of the House of Labor: The Workplace, the State, and American Labor Activism, 1865–1925 (1987 - a Pulitzer Prize finalist); Workers' Control in America (1979), and Beyond Equality: Labor and the Radical Republicans, 1862–1872 (1967). He served in the U.S. Army at the close of World War II, and was a machinist and union activist during the 1950s. As editor of International Labor and Working-Class History for many years, he encouraged the development of an international perspective on the history of working people. (March, 2001)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Great Depression and New Deal History
Alan Brinkley.
This forum was moderated by Alan Brinkley, the Allan Nevins Professor of History at Columbia University in New York, where he has taught since 1991. His published works include Voices of Protest: Huey Long, Father Coughlin, and the Great Depression, which won the 1983 National Book Award; The Unfinished Nation: A Concise History of the American People; The End of Reform: New Deal Liberalism in Recession and War; and Liberalism and Its Discontents. He is presently writing a biography of Henry R. Luce, to be published by Alfred A. Knopf. His essays, articles, and reviews have appeared in scholarly journals and periodicals such as the New Yorker, the New York Times Magazine, and the New Republic. Prior to teaching at Columbia, Brinkley taught at Harvard, where he was awarded the Joseph R. Levenson Memorial Teaching Prize. (April, 2001)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on American Indian History
Frederick E. Hoxie.
This forum was moderated by Frederick E. Hoxie, Swanlund Professor of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign. His thirty-year teaching career also has included stints at Northwestern University, Amherst College, the Buffalo Bill Historical Center Institute in Western American History, and elementary and high schools in Philadelphia and Honolulu. He was the Director of the D’Arcy McNickle Center for the History of the American Indian at The Newberry Library from 1994 to 1998. Hoxie is the author of Talking Back to Civilization: Indian Voices From the Progressive Era, 1890–1925, Parading Through History: The Making of the Crow Nation in America, 1805–1935, A Final Promise: The Campaign to Assimilate the Indians, 1880–1920, and The Crow. He is editor of, among many other works, Indians in American History: An Introduction and The Encyclopedia of North American Indians . Hoxie has served as historical consultant and expert witness to numerous tribes, including in the case of Harjo et al v. Pro Football Inc. (1992–1999), a copyright complaint against the Washington Redskins. (May, 2001)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Teaching U.S. Imperialism
Emily S. Rosenberg.
This forum was moderated by Emily S. Rosenberg, DeWitt Wallace Professor of History at Macalester College who specializes in United States foreign relations in the 20th century. She is the author of the widely-used book Spreading the American Dream: American Economic and Cultural Expansion, 1890–1945 and, most recently, of Financial Missionaries to the World: The Politics and Culture of Dollar Diplomacy, 1900–1930, which won the Ferrell Senior Book award from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations in 2000. She has co-authored several textbooks, among them In Our Times: America Since 1945 and Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People, and written numerous articles on international finance, gender issues, and foreign relations. (December, 2000)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on African-American History
James O. Horton.
This forum was moderated by James O. Horton, the Benjamin Banneker Professor of American Studies and History at George Washington University and Director of the Afro-American Communities Project of the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian Institution. He has served as historical advisor to several museums in the United States and abroad, and has been historical consultant to numerous film and video productions. He has published numerous articles and seven books including Free People of Color: Inside the African American Community (1993) The History of the African American People (1995), co-edited with Lois E. Horton and In Hope of Liberty: Culture, Protest, and Community Among Northern Free Blacks, 1700–1860 coauthored with Lois E. Horton (nominee for the 1997 Pulitzer Prize in History). Professor Horton has been recognized for teaching excellence, receiving The Carnegie Foundation, CASE Professor of the Year for the District of Columbia, in 1996 and the Trachtenberg Distinguished Teaching Award for George Washington University, 1994. (October, 2000)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Asian American History
John Kuo Wei Tchen.
This forum was moderated by John Kuo Wei Tchen, a historian and cultural activist. Since 1975, he has been studying interethnic and interracial relations of Asians and Americans, helping to build cultural organizations, and exploring how inquiry in the humanities and society can help deepen the quality of public discourse and policy. Dr. Tchen is currently the founding director of the Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program and Institute at New York University. He is the co-founder of the New York Chinatown History Project. Tchen’s most recent book is New York Before Chinatown: Orientalism and the Shaping of American Culture, 1776–1882, and he is co-editing a book of oral histories on what it means to be a Chinese New Yorker. In 1991 Dr. Tchen was awarded the Charles S. Frankel Prize from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and in 1993 he received the City of New York Mayor’s Award of Honor for Arts and Culture. (April, 2000)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on the Constitution
Linda K. Kerber.
This forum was moderated by Linda K. Kerber, the May Brodbeck Professor in the Liberal Arts and Professor of History at the University of Iowa where she has won awards for her teaching. Past-president of Organization of American Historians and the American Studies Association, she is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Professor Kerber is the author of numerous books including: No Constitutional Right to be Ladies: Women and the Obligation of Citizenship (1998); Toward an Intellectual History of Women (1997); Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America (1970); and Federalists in Dissent: Imagery and Ideology in Jeffersonian America (1970). (March, 2000)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Slavery
Ira Berlin.
This forum was moderated by Ira Berlin, a Professor of History at the University of Maryland. Ira Berlin has written extensively on American history in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, particularly on Southern and Afro-American life. His most recent book, Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America (1998) won the Bancroft Prize and a number of other prizes. His first book, Slaves Without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South (1975) won the Best First Book Prize awarded by the National Historical Society. He is the founder of the Freedmen and Southern Society Project, which he directed until 1991. The project’s multi-volume Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation (1982, 1985, 1990, 1993) has twice been awarded the Thomas Jefferson Prize of the Society for the History of the Federal Government as well as the J. Franklin Jameson Prize of the American Historical Association for outstanding editorial achievement. (October, 1999)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Immigration & Ethnicity
Gary Gerstle.
This forum was moderated by Gary Gerstle, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Maryland at College Park. He is the author of Nationalism and Multiculturalism in the United States, 1900 to the Present. Among his many articles addressing issues of immigration and ethnicity are “Liberty, Coercion, and the Making of Americans,” in the Journal of American History, and “Immigration and Ethnicity in the American Century,” in the forthcoming Making Sense of the 20th century, Harvard Sitkoff, editor. With John Mollenkopf, he is currently editing a volume entitled Immigrants, Civic Culture, and Modes of Political Incorporation. Professor Gerstle has also published: Working-Class Americanism: The Politics of Labor in a Textile City, 1914–1960 (1989); The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930–1980 (1989), edited with Steve Fraser; Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People, a college textbook, co-authored with John Murrin, Paul Johnson, James McPherson, Emily Rosenberg, and Norman Rosenberg (1996); and America Transformed: A History of the United States since 1900, co-authored with Emily Rosenberg and Norman Rosenberg (1999). He teaches the second half of the U.S. History Survey at the University of Maryland. (November, 1999)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on World War II
William Tuttle.
This forum was moderated by William Tuttle, a professor of history at the University of Kansas. His writings include: “Daddy’s Gone to War”: The Second World War in the Lives of America’s Children); with David M. Katzman, Plain Folk: The Life Stories of Undistinguished Americans; W.E.B. Du Bois; Race Riot: Chicago in the Red Summer of 1919; and with Mary Beth Norton et al., A People and a Nation: A History of the United States. (March, 1999)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on the American West
Richard White.
This forum was moderated by Richard White, Professor of History at Stanford University. He is the author of It’s Your Misfortune and None of My Own: A History of the American West; The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650–1815; The Roots of Dependency: Subsistence, Environment, and Social change Among the Choctaws, Pawnees, and Navajos; Land Use, Environment, and Social Change: The Shaping of Island County, Washington; The Organic Machine; and most recently Remembering Ahanagran: Storytelling in a Family’s Past. His books have won the Francis Parkman Prize and the Albert Beveridge and Western Historical Awards. Professor White has also won a MacArthur Fellowship. (April, 1999)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Women’s History
Gerda Lerner.
This forum was moderated by Gerda Lerner, a groundbreaking women’s historian and the Robinson-Edwards Professor of History, Emerita, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is author of numerous books including: The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina: Pioneers for Woman’s Rights and Abolition; The Feminist Thought of Sarah Grimke; Why History Matters: Life and Thought; and The Creation of Patriarchy. (September, 1998)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on the American Revolution
Gary Nash.
This forum was moderated by Gary Nash, Professor of History and Director of the National Center for History in the Schools at UCLA. He is author of numerous books including: The Urban Crucible: Social Change, Political Consciousness, and the Origins of the American Revolution; Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia’s Black Community, 1720–1840; Race and Revolution; Red, White and Black: The Peoples of Early America; and Quakers and Politics: Pennsylvania, 1681–1726. (October, 1998)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on Cultural History
Lawrence Levine.
This forum was moderated by Lawrence Levine, Professor of History at George Mason University and an internationally renowned interdisciplinary scholar whose work has focused on American culture. In 1983 he was one of the first historians to be awarded a MacArthur Prize; most recently he served as President of the Organization of American Historians. Among his many books, probably the best known are Highbrow/Lowbrow: The Emergence of Cultural Hierarchy in America, Black Culture and Black Consciousness: Afro-American Folk Thought from Slavery to Freedom, and The Opening of the American Mind:Canons, Culture, and History. (November, 1998)
Resources Available: TEXT.

talking history
Forum on the Vietnam War Era
Marilyn Young.
This forum was moderated by Marilyn Young, an award-winning teacher of history at New York University. Professor Young specializes in U.S. foreign relations; U.S.-East Asian relations; and Third-World women and gender. She is the author of numerous works including: The Vietnam Wars, 1945–1990; “Vietnam War in American Memory,” in The Vietnam War: Vietnamese and American Perspectives; Promissory Notes: Women in the Transition to Socialism, ed. with Sonia Kruks and Rayna Rapp; and Vietnam: A Documented History, with Marvin Gettleman, Bruce Franklin, and Jane Franklin. (December, 1998)
Resources Available: TEXT.