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There are 30 matching records, sorted by relevance. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
Poston, Arizona 1942–1996
Scott Hopkins, University of Arizona.
This exhibit by an art student begins with 11 color postcard-like recreations of original black-and-white photographs documenting life in the Poston (AZ) War Relocation Center, where more than 17,000 Japanese-Americans were interned between 1942 and 1945 by the U.S. military. An accompanying essay provides background information and a brochure describes the Poston Monument. In addition, viewers can access six pages from “an Internment Camp’s High School Yearbook,” and additional legal documents, memoirs, newspaper and journal articles, a timeline, and book excerpts through links to 26 related documents and 40 websites. An important site on the internment experience.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-07-12.

www.history
The Japanese American Exhibit and Access Project
University of Washington Libraries.
Internment experiences of Americans and Canadians of Japanese heritage in the Northwest during World War II are documented in this site, which features an exhibit that “tells the story of Seattle’s Japanese American community in the spring and summer of 1942 and their four month sojourn at the Puyallup Assembly Center known as ‘Camp Harmony.’” The internment camp section furnishes nearly 150 primary documents—including 12 issues of the “Camp Harmony Newsletter,” 16 government documents, 10 letters, 39 photographs, 24 drawings, a scrapbook, 20 newspaper clippings, and a 7,500-word chapter from the book Nisei Daughter that describes camp life. The site also provides archival guides and inventories for 21 University of Washington Library manuscript holdings relating to the internment and for 21 related collections; a 46-title bibliography for further reading; and additional information and documents related to Japanese Canadian internment. Valuable for those studying the wartime experiences and culture of interned Japanese Americans.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-07-05.

www.history
Japanese-American Internment
C. John Yu.
In 1942 President Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 authorizing the removal of more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry, two-thirds of whom were U.S. Citizens, into internment camps. This site, created for a class project at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, provides a gateway to brief essays and samplings of primary sources about the internment period from 1942–1945, a time line, oral histories, and photographs. There are links to 34 electronic essays and roughly 50 websites. Some of the more useful links are to the the National Archives and Records Administration, which documents the rights of American Citizens and actions of the Federal Government; the War Relocations Authority Camps in Arizona; the Museum of the City of San Franciso; the Japanese American Exhibit and Access Project; and Heart Mountain Digital Preservation Project. The site also contains personal reminiscences of life in the camp. Though many links on this site are useful for research on Asian-American history and the history of the World War II home front, this site should be used carefully. Some of the information presented as “fact” is highly controversial, some links present hearsay or speculation as fact, and several of the links are broken or obsolete.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2003-11-13.

www.history
Japanese-American Internment Camps During World War II
Roy Webb, Multimedia Archivist, University of Utah, J. Willard Marriott Library Special Collections.
This online exhibit captures daily life in two World War II Japanese Internment camps in America from 1942 to 1946 through 38 photographic images from the camps. The Tule Lake camp in northern California was one of the most infamous camps in which prisoners frequently conducted strikes and demonstrations to demand their release. The 28 photographs in the Tule Lake section, drawn from the Special Collections Department of the University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library, are grouped into four themes: Living, Labor, Education, and Buildings. They document the arrival, work, schools, homes, and businesses of the more than 18,000 Tule Lake residents. The ten camp photographs from Topaz, Utah, donated by George G. Murakami, an American from Berkeley, California, who was interned at Topaz, are a more personal account of internment. These images include 1944 and 1945 graduation announcements from the Topaz Camp High School as well as photographs of Murakami’s friends and the school football team. Also included is an image of a 1990 letter from President George Bush to former internees. This site is somewhat limited in selection and scope and does not include captions or descriptive notes for the selected photographs; but for those researching the lives of Japanese Americans during World War II, this site offers a compelling glimpse into their everyday lives.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-04-12.

www.history
Online Archive of California
University of California.
This impressive archive provides more than 81,000 images and 1,000 texts on the history and culture of California. Images may be searched by keyword or browsed according to six categories: history, nature, people, places, society, and technology. Topics include exploration, Indians, gold rushes, and California events. Three collections of texts are also available. Japanese American Relocation Digital Archive furnishes 309 documents and 67 oral histories. Free Speech Movement: Student Protest, U.C. Berkeley, 1964–1965 provides 541 documents, including books, letters, press releases, oral histories, photographs, and trial transcripts. UC Berkeley Regional Oral History Office offers full-text transcripts of 139 interviews organized into 14 topics including agriculture, arts, California government, society and family life, wine industry, disability rights, Earl Warren, Jewish community leaders, medicine (including AIDS), suffragists, and U.C. Black alumni.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-10.

www.history
A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution
Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History.
See JAH web review by Allan W. Austin.
Reviewed 2005-06-01.
Based on a 1987 Smithsonian exhibition, this site allows visitors to click and drag through sections of text, music, personal accounts, and images that tell stories of the forced—and ultimately determined to be unconstitutional—internment during World War II of 120,000 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast. Also provides searching capabilities to retrieve images of more than 800 artifacts relating to the lives of those interned. Sections in the narrative cover immigration, removal, internment, loyalty, service, and justice. Provides a 5,000-word audio file of interview excerpts; 6,400-word accompanying text from the 1994 traveling exhibition; annotated timeline; 72-title bibliography; 20 links to related sites; and two classroom activities. Also invites visitors to share their responses and to read those of others. Of value to students of Asian American history, the homefront during World War II, and constitutional issues.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2002-03-15.

www.history
Digital History
Steven Mintz and Sara McNeil.
See JAH web review by Simon Appleford and Vernon Burton.
Reviewed 2008-03-01.
Provides multimedia resources and links for teaching American history and conducting basic research, while focusing on slavery, ethnic history, private life, technological achievement, and American film. Presents more than 600 documents pertaining to American politics, diplomacy, social history, slavery, Mexican American history, and Native American history, searchable by author, time period, subject, and keyword, and annotated with essays of 300–500 words each. The site offers a full U.S. history textbook and more than 1,500 searchable and briefly annotated links to American history-related sites, including approximately 150 links to historic Supreme Court decisions, 330 links to audio files of historic speeches, and more than 450 links to audio files and transcripts of historians discussing their own books. Also includes five high school lesson plans; 39 fact sheets with quotations and study questions on major historical topics; 10 essays (800 words) on past controversies, such as the Vietnam War, socialism, and the war on poverty; seven essays presenting historical background on more recent controversies, such as hostage crises and NATO in Kosovo; and essays of more than 10,000 words each on the history of American film and private life in America. Four current exhibits offer 217 photographs, ca. 1896–1903, from the Calhoun Industrial School in Alabama, a freedmen’s school; 19 watercolor sketches by a Civil War soldier; seven letters between 18th-century English historian Catharine Macaulay and American historian Mercy Otis Warren; and an 1865 letter from Frederick Douglass to Mary Todd Lincoln. A valuable site for high school students and teachers looking for comprehensive guidance from professional historians on the current state of debate on many topics in American history.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
War Relocation Authority Photographs of Japanese-American Evacuation and Resettlement
Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley.
This site contains 6,834 digital images related to Japanese-American internment during World War II. The War Relocation Authority exhibited these photographs to present the camps in a positive light. Users can view the site three ways: “Standard” provides a collection summary; “Entire Finding Aid” lists the series descriptions in more detail; “Online Items” lists all 6,834 images complete with a thumbnail and brief description for each image. Visitors can also search by keyword, though the search works differently depending on which view is being used. The easiest way to use the search is to choose the “Online Items” view, in which a search for “school” will list images with “school” in the description. Images in the collection come from a number of relocation centers throughout the country, including ones in Colorado, Arizona, Wyoming, and Arkansas. “Scope and Content” is a 250-word explanation of the site’s contents with brief paragraph about the historical significance of the photographs.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2005-08-02.

many pasts
Mako Nakagawa Recalls the Hearings of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians, 1981
Mako Nakagawa is a Nisei (second generation) Japanese American born in 1937 in Seattle. With her mother and sisters, she was incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka incarceration camp, Idaho. Her father was arrested and interned separately from the family for several years. In 1944, the family was reunited at the Crystal City, Texas, internment camp for enemy aliens and their families. In postwar years, Nakagawa became a teacher, principal, and multicultural educator. In this interview excerpt, Nakagawa recounts how in 1981 she helped her father testify at the federal congressional hearings held by the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). The CWRIC heard from 750 witnesses in cities around the country and gathered documentary evidence proving that the mass removal and incarceration were not based on military necessity, but rather were motivated by race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.
Resources Available: TEXT.

www.history
Ansel Adams’s Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Jasmine Alinder.
Reviewed 2013-12-01.
During World War II, the U.S. Government forced more than 100,000 Japanese Americans to leave their homes and businesses, relocating them to interment camps from California to Arkansas. Well-known photographer Ansel Adams documented the lives of Japanese Americans at the Manzanar War Relocation Center in California—from portraits to daily life, including agriculture and leisure. This site presents 242 original negatives and 209 photographic prints. These are often presented together, showing Adams’s developing and cropping techniques. This website also offers a digital version of Adams’s 112-page book on Manzanar, published in 1944, Born Free and Equal. Adams donated the collection to the Library of Congress in 1965, writing, “The purpose of my work was to show how these people, suffering under a great injustice . . . had overcome the sense of defeat and dispair [sic] by building for themselves a vital community in an arid (but magnificent) environment.” Valuable for those studying the World War II homefront, discrimination, Asian Americans, and photography.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

many pasts
Milton Eisenhower Justifies the Internment of Japanese Americans
America fought World War II to preserve freedom and democracy, yet that same war featured the greatest suppression of civil liberties in the nation’s history. In an atmosphere of hysteria, President Roosevelt, encouraged by officials at all levels of the federal government, authorized the internment of tens of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and resident aliens from Japan. On March 18, 1942, Roosevelt authorized the establishment of the War Relocation Authority (WRA) to govern these detention camps. He chose as its first head Milton Eisenhower, a New Deal bureaucrat in the Department of Agriculture and brother of General Dwight D. Eisenhower. In a 1942 film entitled Japanese Relocation, produced by the Office of War Information, Eisenhower offered the U.S. government’s rationale for the relocation of Japanese-American citizens. He claimed that the Japanese “cheerfully” participated in the relocation process, a statement belied by all contemporary and subsequent accounts of the 1942 events.
Resources Available: TEXT, AUDIO.

www.history
Family History Web Site
Collen M. O’Connor, San Diego Mesa College.
A collection of 89 family photographs exhibited to encourage interest in history through a connection with the daily lives of ordinary people. Photographs submitted by students, faculty, and staff, solicited by Professor O’Connor through a contest, are displayed here in categories or as a slide show. Categories of photos include women, children, soldiers, period dress, and occasion. Each photograph caption (up to 100 words) identifies its subject. These photographs are diverse, including an American Civil War soldier, a wedding in a Japanese internment camp, and a small boy in Uganda in 1975. Professor O’Connor’s 2,800-word essay explains how to collect family history and an entry form allows visitors to submit their own family photos for use on the site. Within categories, photos are arranged by which contest prizes, rather than date or region. The site will be interesting for work in family history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-06-17.

many pasts
Tosh Yasutake and Mitsuye May Yamada Discuss Tosh’s Decision to Join U.S. Army and Visiting Their Father at a U.S. Department of Justice Incarceration Camp
Tosh Yasutake is a Nisei (second generation) Japanese American born in 1922 in Seattle. His sister Mitsuye May (Yasutake) Yamada is a Nisei born in Japan in 1923. Their father, Jack Kaichiro Yasutake, was employed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as an interpreter for twenty years. On December 7, 1941, the father was arrested and interned as an enemy alien at a Department of Justice camp, along with other Issei (first generation) community leaders. Tosh attended the University of Washington before being removed from Seattle with his mother, May, and two brothers in spring 1942. The family was held at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and then the Minidoka, Idaho, incarceration camp. Tosh worked as a hospital attendant and laboratory technician in Minidoka. In the first interview excerpt with Tosh, he explains his decision to volunteer for the U.S. Army in March 1943. In the second excerpt, Tosh and May recount how they received permission to travel from Minidoka to visit their father at U.S. Department of Justice internment camp in Lordsburg, New Mexico, before Tosh reports for duty. While serving as a medic with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Tosh was wounded during combat in southern France in 1944. May left Minidoka to attend college in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1944, their mother and younger brother joined their father at the Crystal City, Texas, internment camp.
Resources Available: TEXT.

www.history
Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project
Densho.
See JAH web review by Allan W. Austin.
Reviewed 2005-06-01.
Over 750 hours of video interviews and 10,000 historic images provide first-hand accounts of Japanese Americans unjustly incarcerated by the U.S. government during World War II. Densho uses the accounts of individuals to explore principles of democracy and to encourage tolerance and justice in situations when citizens and legal immigrants are confused with enemies. The website features “Sites of Shame,” an overview of all types of detention facilities that held Japanese Americans, and “Causes of the Incarceration,” an examination of four motivations for the forced removal. Other primary sources found on the site are newspaper accounts, government orders and historical photographs. Teacher resources include social studies lessons (grades 4–12) with multimedia materials and classroom activities. A terminology list and glossary; timeline; and web, printed, and video sources provide interested viewers with further avenues for exploring this significant historical event.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2009-10-06.

many pasts
Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga Recalls Caring for her Baby in the Manzanar Incarceration Camp
Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga is a Nisei (second generation) Japanese American born in 1925 in Los Angeles. She was incarcerated at Manzanar, California, and later Jerome and Rohwer, Arkansas. In the 1980s, working as the primary archival researcher for the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians, she discovered documents that led to the federal congressional commission’s recommendation of a presidential apology and monetary redress for surviving Japanese American detainees. In this interview excerpt, she describes the difficulty of caring for a young baby in the crude living conditions of Manzanar. She also speaks of the inferior health care available to Japanese Americans in the incarceration camps.
Resources Available: TEXT, AUDIO.

many pasts
Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga Describes Preparing for ’Evacuation’ To an Incarceration Camp
Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga is a Nisei (2nd generation) Japanese American born in 1925 in Los Angeles. She was incarcerated at Manzanar, California, and later Jerome and Rohwer, Arkansas. In the 1980s, working as the primary archival researcher for the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians, she discovered documents that led to the federal congressional commission’s recommendation of a presidential apology and monetary redress for surviving Japanese American detainees. In this interview excerpt, she describes the confusion and stress of having to pack for immediate “evacuation” from the military zones declared on the West Coast in early 1942. People destroyed family treasures that tied them culturally to Japan, and with as little as a week’s notice, they were forced to sell belongings for a fraction of their value.
Resources Available: TEXT, AUDIO.

many pasts
“We Had to Be So Careful”A German Farmer’s Recollections of Anti-German Sentiment in World War I
German Americans had a complex response to the attacks on their loyalty that emerged when the United States went to war against Germany in 1917. During and after the war, many German Americans began to conceal their ethnic identity—some changed their names; others stopped speaking German; still others quit German-American organizations. Many, like Frank Brocke, son of a German-American farmer, tried to keep a low profile. In this interview, Frank Brocke discussed his own assimilation (he later became the president of the local bank) which led him to justify the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II—a stance that many Japanese Americans and others would disclaim.
Resources Available: TEXT, AUDIO.

www.history
Columbia River Basin Ethnic History Archive
Columbia River Ethnic History Project.
See JAH web review by Erin Passehl.
Reviewed 2011-09-01.
This site offers a large archive of selected documents, reports, records, maps, photographs, newspapers, artifacts, and oral history interviews. Items are searchable by ethnic group, keyword, archive, type of material, date, or subject. Brief historical overviews and bibliographies for each ethnic group profiled are also available in the archive section. Another section has lessons plans for teachers on African Americans, immigration and settlement, migration, and ethnic culture and identity, 1850–1950. It also offers tutorials on using the archive, using history databases on the web, interpreting photographs, interpreting documents, and interpreting oral history. Historical overviews are provided on the various ethnic groups that settled the Columbia River Basin. A discussion forum offers a place to talk about discoveries in the archive or questions. Topics currently include ethnic groups, ethnicity and race, work and labor, immigration and migration, family life, religion, social conditions, discrimination, and civil rights. A very useful site for researching or teaching the social and cultural history of the Columbia River Basin.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Land of (Unequal) Opportunity
University of Arkansas.
While many are familiar with the 1957 Little Rock High School integration crisis, far fewer students of U.S. Civil Rights history may be aware of the longer history of that struggle in Arkansas. This website includes more than 460 documents and images, including cartoons, court decisions, photographs, newspaper articles, letters, and essays related to that history. For example, an essay on the meaning of relocation written by a high school student at Arkansas’s Jerome Relocation Center in 1943 brings a more personal perspective to the story of internment, as the student describes the ways in which members of her community have struggled between the “fighting spirit” and the “giving up spirit.” Users new to Civil Rights history in Arkansas may want to begin with the extensive timeline that describes events from the arrival of slaves in Arkansas in the 1720s to a 2006 State Supreme Court ruling that struck down a ban on gays serving as foster parents. The website also includes ten lesson plans geared for middle school students that make use of the website’s resources—such as a speech given by Governor Oral Fabus in 1958. An extensive bibliography of secondary sources related to many aspects of Civil Rights, including African-American, homosexual, and women’s issues, Japanese relocation, religious intolerance, political rights, and anti-civil liberties groups and issues, is also available.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-11-05.

www.history
Life Interrupted: Japanese American Experience in WWII Arkansas
University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Japanese American National Museum.
See JAH web review by Allan W. Austin.
Reviewed 2005-06-01.
This compelling, well-designed site offers a rare glimpse into the World War II experiences of Japanese Americans in two Arkansas internment camps. A series of 30 photographs illuminates the daily lives of inmates at school, in a clinic, working at a sawmill. Physical conditions in the camp are captured effectively by several aerial views. Three QuickTime Virtual Reality (QTVR) images that allow for 360-degree ground-level views are equally impressive. These photographs are supported by an in-depth timeline of events, an interactive map, and an extensive education section providing links to resources hosted by other sites.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2003-03-27.

many pasts
Masao Takahashi Describes Incarceration at the Missoula, Montana, Department of Justice Detention Center
This written testimony of Masao Takahashi was presented to the federal congressional Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). The CWRIC held 20 days of hearings and heard 750 witnesses in cities around the country. They also gathered documentary evidence proving that the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II was not based on military necessity, but rather was rooted in race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership. The commission’s findings led the way to the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which authorized a presidential apology and partial monetary redress to survivors of the camps. Takahashi was arrested after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and interned by the Department of Justice at Missoula, Montana; Santa Fe, New Mexico; and Crystal City, Texas. At Crystal City he was reunited with his family, who had been incarcerated at Minidoka, Idaho. This written testimony was presented at the CWRIC hearing in Seattle, on September 10, 1981, in the section titled “Japanese Speakers.” Takahashi’s daughter Mako Nakagawa translated his spoken testimony for the commissioners at the hearing.
Resources Available: TEXT.

many pasts
“Evacuation Was a Mistake”: Anger at Being Interned
America fought World War II to preserve freedom and democracy, yet that same war featured the greatest suppression of civil liberties in the nation’s history. In an atmosphere of hysteria, President Roosevelt, encouraged by officials at all levels of the federal government, authorized the internment of tens of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and resident aliens from Japan. The federal government tried to monitor conditions inside the relocation camps and keep tabs on the feelings and attitudes of the internees. An interview conducted in the Manzanar, California, camp in July 1943 by a U.S. government employee with a man identified only as “an Older Nisei” (an American-born person whose parents were born in Japan) revealed the anger many internees felt toward the United States. Asserting his loyalty and his early willingness to support the war effort, the Older Nisei condemned the evacuation of Japanese Americans from the West Coast. He questioned why the government did not act similarly against citizens of German and Italian descent.
Resources Available: TEXT.

many pasts
Executive Order 9066: The President Authorizes Japanese Relocation
In an atmosphere of World War II hysteria, President Roosevelt, encouraged by officials at all levels of the federal government, authorized the internment of tens of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and resident aliens from Japan. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, dated February 19, 1942, gave the military broad powers to ban any citizen from a fifty- to sixty-mile-wide coastal area stretching from Washington state to California and extending inland into southern Arizona. The order also authorized transporting these citizens to assembly centers hastily set up and governed by the military in California, Arizona, Washington state, and Oregon. Although it is not well known, the same executive order (and other war-time orders and restrictions) were also applied to smaller numbers of residents of the United States who were of Italian or German descent. For example, 3,200 resident aliens of Italian background were arrested and more than 300 of them were interned. About 11,000 German residents—including some naturalized citizens—were arrested and more than 5000 were interned. Yet while these individuals (and others from those groups) suffered grievous violations of their civil liberties, the war-time measures applied to Japanese Americans were worse and more sweeping, uprooting entire communities and targeting citizens as well as resident aliens.
Resources Available: TEXT.

many pasts
Korematsu v. United States: The U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Internment
America fought World War II to preserve freedom and democracy, yet that same war featured the greatest suppression of civil liberties in the nation’s history. In an atmosphere of hysteria, President Roosevelt, encouraged by officials at all levels of the federal government, authorized the internment of tens of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and resident aliens from Japan. One of the most important of the legal challenges to the internment policy was Korematsu v. United States, a case brought by Fred T. Korematsu, a Nisei (an American-born person whose parents were born in Japan). Korematsu had been arrested by the FBI for failing to report for relocation and was convicted in federal court in September 1942. The U.S. Supreme Court, in a sharply divided 6–3 decision, upheld Korematsu’s conviction in late 1944. The majority opinion, written by Justice Hugo Black, rejected the plaintiff’s discrimination argument and upheld the government’s right to relocate citizens in the face of wartime emergency.
Resources Available: TEXT.

www.history
Dr. Seuss Went to War: A Catalog of Political Cartoons
Mandeville Special Collections Library, University of California, San Diego.
See JAH web review by Chris Lamb.
Reviewed 2013-12-01.
Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel), the prolific and talented childrens' book author, was also a political cartoonist. From 1941 to 1943, Seuss drew over 400 editorial cartoons as the chief editorial cartoonist for the New York newspaper PM. All 400 of his cartoons have been scanned onto this website by the staff of the Mandeville Special Collection Library at the University of California, San Diego, which houses the original cartoons in the Dr. Seuss Collection. The cartoons are primarily related to issues surrounding World War II, and include charicature images of political figures like Adolph Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and Franklin D. Roosevelt. There are also a series of ten War bond cartoons that Seuss drew for PM. The site has a brief (500-word introduction that gives an overview of Seuss' life and career. Currently the images are accessible only by the month and year of publication, though the authors promise a subject browser in the future. The site is somewhat difficult to use because of the lack of keyword search, but it is still a rich resource for information on popular culture, politics, and the media during World War II.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-02-09.

www.history
Herblock’s History: Political Cartoons from the Crash to the Millennium
Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Chris Lamb.
Reviewed 2013-12-01.
An exhibit of 150 cartoons drawn between 1929 and 2000 by three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist Herblock (Herbert Block) that comment on major events and public issues. The site also presents a 2,800-word essay by Block on “the cartoon as an opinion medium”; a 1,900-word biographical essay; and 15 caricatures of the cartoonist by well-known colleagues, such as Tony Auth, Jim Borgman, Paul Conrad, Jeff Danziger, Jules Feiffer, Chuck Jones, Pat Oliphant, and Tom Toles. Originally produced as an October 2000 exhibition in the Library of Congress’s Swann Gallery to celebrate the artist’s gift of more than 100 original drawings. Organized according to 13 roughly chronological sections, with an additional segment devoted to Presidents, the exhibit features explicatory annotations of up to 100 words that provide historical context for each image. Valuable for those studying 20th century popular culture and the history of political cartoons.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-09.

www.history
National Museum of American History, Behring Center
National Museum of American History.
See JAH web review by John McClymer.
Reviewed 2008-12-01.
The highlight of the site is its “Virtual Exhibition” section. There are currently 31 exhibits available. These include Separate is Not Equal, celebrating the 50 year anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision (including audio and video files); Bon Appetit, documenting chef Julia Child’s kitchen and career (including panoramic views and virtual examination of Childs’s kitchen tools); and West Point, marking 200 years of military academy training. Parents and teachers may appreciate the “Not Just for Kids” area with hands-on history and science. A “Music Room” allows visitors to explore several types of music, including jazz, popular, and traditional American music. “What Is It?” allows visitors to investigate and try to identify an odd, mysterious object using clues and virtual visual inspection. Less useful for research, this site would be most useful as a virtual visit to the Museum.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2004-05-19.

www.history
Calisphere
California Digital Library.
See JAH web review by Daisy Martin.
Reviewed 2010-03-01.
A gateway website to hundreds of thousands of digitized items, massed into a collection of photographs, advertising ephemera, political cartoons, posters, as well as documents, diary transcripts, and newspaper articles. The website focuses on California history and is meant to provide a source for history teachers who are looking for illustrative materials keyed on the website to the California Content Standards in History-Social Sciences, English-Language Arts, and Visual Arts for K-12. Clicking on “Advertising” on the index page brings up 530 color images of fruit and vegetable crate labels. “Bracero Program” brings up 37 images of Mexican agricultural workers. “Gold Rush” brings up 404 visual images and scans of 67 related texts. “Immigration” yields 212 images and 31 texts. “Modoc War” collects 29 stereographic photos of Modocs and the Lava Beds area. “Zoot Suit Riots” brings up 23 photos and 26 texts (letters and newspaper articles) about the 1942 murder of a Mexican-American man in Los Angeles by “Zoot Suiters.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-04.

secrets of great history teachers
Interview with Maurice Butler
Maurice Butler teaches U.S. history at Theodore Roosevelt Senior High School in the District of Columbia. He has been teaching in the District of Columbia Public School system since 1974. At Roosevelt High School, he is the Change Facilitator, a DC Area Writing Project Writing Consultant, the head Tennis Coach, one of the sponsors for the school newspaper, and he is the coordinator of the 9th Grade Prep Academy. In addition to teaching, he is currently pursuing his Ph.D. at Berne University in Curriculum and Instruction.
Resources Available: TEXT.

digital blackboard
Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry
Bill Friedheim, Borough of Manhattan Community College .
This activity is designed to deepen the understanding of the experience of Japanese internment in the United States during World War Two and promote student-centered collaborative inquiry. It is centered around interrogating primary sources and evaluating historical evidence on the World Wide Web and creating hypertext trails to construct knowledge.
Resources Available: TEXT.