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There are 76 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Digital History
Steven Mintz and Sara McNeil.
See JAH web review by Simon Appleford and Vernon Burton.
Reviewed 2008-03-01.
Provides multimedia resources and links for teaching American history and conducting basic research, while focusing on slavery, ethnic history, private life, technological achievement, and American film. Presents more than 600 documents pertaining to American politics, diplomacy, social history, slavery, Mexican American history, and Native American history, searchable by author, time period, subject, and keyword, and annotated with essays of 300–500 words each. The site offers a full U.S. history textbook and more than 1,500 searchable and briefly annotated links to American history-related sites, including approximately 150 links to historic Supreme Court decisions, 330 links to audio files of historic speeches, and more than 450 links to audio files and transcripts of historians discussing their own books. Also includes five high school lesson plans; 39 fact sheets with quotations and study questions on major historical topics; 10 essays (800 words) on past controversies, such as the Vietnam War, socialism, and the war on poverty; seven essays presenting historical background on more recent controversies, such as hostage crises and NATO in Kosovo; and essays of more than 10,000 words each on the history of American film and private life in America. Four current exhibits offer 217 photographs, ca. 1896–1903, from the Calhoun Industrial School in Alabama, a freedmen’s school; 19 watercolor sketches by a Civil War soldier; seven letters between 18th-century English historian Catharine Macaulay and American historian Mercy Otis Warren; and an 1865 letter from Frederick Douglass to Mary Todd Lincoln. A valuable site for high school students and teachers looking for comprehensive guidance from professional historians on the current state of debate on many topics in American history.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
WWW-Virtual Library, History Central Catalogue
History Index Network, University of Kansas.
Created by an international group of volunteer institutions, this site offers a gateway with thousands of links to general history resources and seeks to provide “effective tools for practicing historians wishing to work online.“ Links are presented for the following categories: ”Research: Methods and Materials“; ”Eras and Epochs“; ”Historical Topics“; and ”By Countries and Regions."
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
New York Public Library Digital Gallery
New York Public Library.
This massive collection presents more than 550,000 images relevant to both U.S. and world history, from the earliest days of print culture to the present. These images consist primarily of historical maps, posters, prints and photographs, illuminated manuscript pages, and images drawn from published books. For browsing, the materials are divided by subject heading, library of origin, the name of the item’s creator and/or publisher, and by collection: Arts & Literature; Cities & Building; Culture & Society; History & Geography; Industry & Technology; Nature & Science; and Printing & Graphics. Within these broad collection headings, the images are further subdivided into more specific groupings, for example, Indonesian dance, dress and fashion, Civil War medical care, and New York City apartment buildings. Keyword and Advanced Search options are useful for those wishing to locate specific items. All images can be downloaded for personal use and are accompanied by detailed biographic information, though users will have to turn elsewhere for further historical context.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Avalon Project: Documents in Law, History, and Government
William C. Fray and Lisa A. Spar.
This website, sponsored by Yale Law School with the International Relations and Security Network (ISN), is a collection of over 3,500 full-text documents relevant to the fields of law, history, economics, politics, diplomacy, and government. The documents are divided into four century categories: pre-18th, 18th, 19th, and 20th. Includes treaties, presidential papers and addresses, and colonial charters, as well as state and federal constitutional and legal documents. The documents are grouped into 64 Major Collection categories as well, such as Thomas Jefferson’s papers, American diplomacy, and the Cold War. All materials can be accessed through an alphabetical list, through the Major Collections page, through the four century pages, or by a keyword search. All of the search modes are easily navigable. Though most of these documents are directly related to American history, the site also includes over 100 documents on ancient, medieval, and Renaissance history, European history, and modern diplomatic documents such as the Hamas Covenant. The site is ideal for researching American diplomacy, constitutional, political, and legal history.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Heading West & Touring West
New York Public Library.
See JAH web review by William D. Rowley.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
This site is home to two related exhibits about the exploration and settlement of the American west. “Heading West” is a collection of 15 maps produced between 1540 and 1900 and divided into five categories: imagining, exploring, settling, mining, and traveling. A 700-word essay introduces the exhibit and each image is accompanied by 50–400 words of explanation. The site links to 16 other sites about exploration and maps of the west. “Touring West” is a collection of materials about performers who toured the west in the 19th century. It is divided into five sections: travel, abolitionists, railroads, recitals, and heroics. Visitors will find 3 images in each section and 50–400 words of explanation. The images include prints and photographs of performers, programs, and promotional posters. An introductory essay of 500-words describes the collection. The site offers 15 links to sites about performance. Both exhibits will be useful to those interested in the west, performance, or search of illustrations.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
American Shores: Maps of the Middle Atlantic Region to 1850
New York Public Library.
This attractive site explores the mid-Atlantic region and history with maps created before 1850. An extensive collection offers more than 1,852 historical maps of many different types. In addition to numerous regional and state maps, these include land surveys, coast surveys, nautical charts, military maps, ornamental maps, and city maps. An overview provides historical context for reading the maps of the geographic regions. In addition, the site offers several special features. “Basics of Maps” explains such cartographic terms and features as orientation, scale, and the cartouche. “Maps Through History” highlights particular maps and map genres from the collection, including a look at New York Harbor, the Hudson River, nautical charts, maps revealing early transportation routes, and maps of American Revolution battle sites. “Geographical Areas” highlights many kinds of maps and what information they offer. Visitors can click on thumbnail images to view enlarged maps and pan and zoom the maps. The collection is searchable by keyword and combinations of keywords. An outstanding resource for those studying the political and social history of the U.S. to 1850.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.
See JAH web review by Clare Corbould.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This extensive, well-designed website features images, essays, lesson plans, and maps all focused on the movements of African Americans from the 1400s to the present. The site is built around the history of 13 African American migration experiences: the transatlantic slave trade (1450s-1867), runaway journeys (1630s-1865), the domestic slave trade (1760s-1865), colonization and emigration (1783–1910s), Haitian Immigration (1791–1809), Western migration (1840s-1970), Northern migration (1840s- 1890), the Great Migration (1916–1930), the Second Great Migration (1940–1970), Caribbean immigration (1900-present), the return South migration (1970-present), Haitian immigration in the 20th century (1970-present), and African immigration (1970-present). Each section includes an extensive image gallery with 60 or more images, two or more color maps and charts, an overview, short web essays on aspects of the migration with links to excerpts from various works on the subject, educational materials, a bibliography, and links to related websites. There are more than 67 detailed and informative color maps and more than 8,300 images available. Educational materials include at least two lesson plans (most have five or more) in each section and links to related resources. More than 90 lesson plans are available. An interactive timeline extends from the 15th to the 21st century and places migration in the context of U.S. history and the history of the African Diaspora. Searching is limited to a keyword search.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Archive of Early American Images
John Carter Brown Library, Brown University.
An archive of pictures of the colonial Americas from books printed or created in Europe between about 1492 and 1825. The database, still being compiled, currently contains 2,268 images and will eventually contain some 6,000 images. Image viewing software is available from the site. The vistor can browse the entire archive or search it by time period, geographical area, keyword, or subjects, including indigenous peoples, flora and fauna, artifacts, industry, human activities, geography, maps, city views and plans, and portraits. Containing many images never before reproduced outside their original books, the archive is a useful resource for studying images from the period.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The Kraus Collection of Sir Francis Drake
Library of Congress.
Sir Francis Drake, English explorer and naval strategist, made many voyages to the Americas in the late 16th century and circumnavigated the globe between 1577 and 1580. This collection of important primary and secondary materials about Drake’s voyages in the Americas offers 60 items in various languages, including manuscripts, books, maps, medals, and portraits. The collection was assembled by Hans Peter Kraus and his wife Hanni. The main presentation is Kraus’s pictorial biography of Drake. The essay also features an extensive seven-part introduction by scholars David W. Waters and Dr. Richard Boulind. Visitors can search by keyword or browse by author, title, or subject. The site offers a timeline of Drake’s voyages with links to documents. It also provides a presentation, “The Actors and Their Stage,” highlighting material on the key personages from Drake’s life, places from his voyages, and images of Drake’s ship Golden Hind and Armada battles. This archive is a useful resource for researching the 16th-century history of the Americas or the Age of Exploration.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
France in America
Library of Congress and Bibliotheque Nationale de France.
A bilingual website (English and French), “France in America” explores the history of the French presence in North America from the early sixteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century through more than 360 manuscripts, books, maps, and other documents. The site is centered on two major themes: “the role played by France in the exploration and settlement of the continent and its participation in several events which indelibly marked the history of the United States: the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and the Louisiana Purchase.” Offering five thematic presentations—“Exploration and Knowledge,” “The Colonies,” “Franco-Indian Alliances,” “Imperial Struggles,” and “The French and North America after the Treaty of Paris”—each with a title exhibit and seven or more additional exhibits that each highlight particular items in the collection, this web site presents primary sources that can be explored through these presentations or browsed in the collections section. A timeline (1515–1804) organizes events in French America by explorations, colonization and development, and conflicts and diplomacy, and places them in the context of events in France. Additionally, there are eight descriptive maps that show various Indian groups in contact with the French and the changes in political boundaries in North America from before 1763 to the era of the Louisiana Purchase. Simple keyword and advanced searches are available. Further additions to the site are planned.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Map Collections: 1500–2003
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site presents a large number of maps from the 16th century to the present day focusing on Americana and “cartographic treasures.” The materials are organized into seven thematic categories—“Cities and Towns”; “Conservation and Environment”; “Discovery and Exploration”; “Cultural Landscapes”; “Military Battles and Campaigns”; “Transportation and Communication”; and “General Maps.” Sections include a number of “special presentations,” including several essays ranging from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Users may zoom in to view details and download maps. 17 specific map collections contained within this larger site are described in detail in the following History Matters entries: “Discovery and Exploration”; “The American Revolution and Its Era”; “Railroad Maps, 1828–1900”; “American Colonization Society Collection: Maps of Liberia, 1830–1870”; “Panoramic Maps, 1847–1929”; “Civil War Maps”; and “Mapping the National Parks.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Words and Deeds in American History: Selected Documents Celebrating the Manuscript Division’s First 100 Years
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site displays approximately 90 primary documents from the 15th century to the mid 20th century. Features eight subjects: the presidency; Congress, law, and politics; military affairs; diplomacy and foreign policy; arts and literature; science, medicine, exploration, and invention; African-American history and culture; and women’s history. The collection emphasizes “prominent Americans whose lives reflect our country’s evolution,” including 23 presidents and figures such as Carter Woodson, Thurgood Marshall, pioneer physician Elizabeth Blackwell, Wilbur Wright, and Alexander Graham Bell. Each subject is accompanied by a useful 100- to 400-word background essay and a link to the document’s host collection. Also includes a 2,000-word essay entitled “Collecting, Preserving, and Researching History: A Peek into the Library of Congress Manuscript Division.” Although limited in size, this site provides an eclectic group of documents of national interest.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
History: The National Park Service
U.S. National Park Service.
Historical aspects of many of the 384 areas under the National Park Service’s stewardship are presented in this expansive site. A “Links to the Past” section contains more than 25 text and picture presentations on such diverse history-related topics as archeology, architecture, cultural groups and landscapes, historic buildings, and military history. Of particular interest to teachers, a section entitled “Teaching with Historic Places” features more than 60 lesson plans designed “to enliven the teaching of history, social studies, geography, civics, and other subjects” by incorporating National Register of Historic Places into educational explorations of historic subjects. Examples include an early rice plantation in South Carolina; the lives of turn-of-the-century immigrant cigar makers near Tampa, Florida; a contrast between the Indianapolis headquarters of African-American businesswoman Madam C. J. Walker and a small store in Kemmerer, Wyoming, that grew into the J. C. Penney Company, the first nationwide department store chain; the Civil War Andersonville prisoner of war camp; President John F. Kennedy’s birthplace; the Liberty Bell; Finnish log cabins in Iowa; and the Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Saugus Iron Works. Especially useful for teachers interested in connecting the study of history with historic sites.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Columbus and the Age of Discovery
Millersville University.
Created to help mark the 500th anniversary of Columbus’s 1492 voyage to America, this site is a “text-retrieval system.” Offers more than 1,110 scholarly and popular articles, drawn from journals, magazines, institutions, speeches, reviews, newspapers, student papers, and “other [secondary] sources relating to various encounter themes.” The search functions are cumbersome—the articles are both indexed by portions of the author’s last name and arranged by underdeveloped category designations.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Map History/History of Cartography: The Gateway to the Subject
Tony Campbell, Map Librarian (retired), British Library, London.
A comprehensive gateway to more than 3000 links that provide historical maps and information about the history of cartography, with an emphasis on early maps. Searchable by an index with more than 400 alphabetically-arranged subject terms or by keyword. Includes sites offering listings for conferences, discussion lists, fellowships, map societies, journals, images of early maps, map collecting, web projects on early cartography, histories of maps, and articles on cartography. Now incorporated into the World Wide Web—Virtual Library and updated weekly. Extremely useful as a starting point for online cartographic resources.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The American Colonist’s Library: Primary Source Documents Pertaining to Early American History
Rick Gardiner, Ph.D. Candidate, History Department, Marquette University.
This website, maintained by graduate student Rick Gardiner, is a gateway to sites that contain well over 500 primary documents and literature that was “most relevant to the colonists' lives in America.” The collection is arranged chronologically and divided into five time periods: 500 BC to 500 AD contains works by classical philosophers and poets such as Aristotle and Socrates, the Bible, and works by figures such as St. Augustine; 500 AD to 1500 contains such works as the Laws of William the Conqueror, Magna Carta, and English law treatises; 1500–1600 provides such documents as the writings of Martin Luther, letters by Christopher Columbus, and Foxe’s Book of Martyrs; 1600–1700 contains a variety of colonial maps and charters, an indentured servant’s contract, the works of John Smith of Jamestown settlement and John Winthrop of Plimouth Plantation, among other documents; and 1700–1800 contains such documents as the Virginia Slave Laws, William Byrd I’s diary, and the works of Lord Bolingbroke. Each chronological category divides the documents into 15 to 25 subject categories. While there is no keyword search, the site’s chronological and subject divisions make it easily navigable, and it provides a wealth of resources for those particularly interested in political, cultural, religious, or constitutional early American history.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies
Pennsylvania Historical Association.
This website makes available a searchable archive of hundreds of regular journal articles, annotated documents, book reviews, and reviews of museum exhibits, films, and historical collections from past issues of the journal. The quarterly journal publishes current scholarship on the history of Pennsylvania and the surrounding area. Currently, back issues from 1934–2003 (vol. 1–70) are available. One volume will be added to the archive each year. The various items in the archive are available as .pdf documents, and they are accompanied by full bibliographic data. Back issues can be searched by author and title, as well as the full text of the item. There are also links to the Pennsylvania Historical Society, Penn State University Libraries, and the Penn State Press. A very useful resource for studying Pennsylvania history or the history of the mid-Atlantic region.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Africans in America
PBS Online.
See JAH web review by Tracey Weis.
Reviewed 2001-06-01.
Created as a companion to the PBS series, Africans in America, this well-produced site was funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. It traces the history of Africans in America in four chronological parts: “The Terrible Transformation” (1450–1750) deals with the beginning of the slave trade into America and slavery’s growth in the early 18th century; “Revolution” (1750–1805) discusses the justifications for slavery in a new nation that was supposed to represent equality and freedom; “Brotherly Love” (1791–1831) traces the development of a wide abolition movement in the North; and “Judgment Day” (1831–1865) depicts the debates over slavery, strengthening of sectionalism, and the Civil War. Each section begins with a roughly 1500-word narrative that offers links to images and documents related to the topic. A Resource Bank lists all the primary documents and images offered within that section. The site offers a total of more than 200 primary documents, more than 75 images and maps, and over 150 brief (150-word) descriptions by historians of specific aspects of the history of slavery, servitude, abolition, and war in America. Teacher guides offer ideas for questions, activities, and lessons for elementary and secondary students. This site is ideal for researching and teaching African-American history up to the Civil War. College survey teachers will find it particularly useful for providing anecdotes for lectures and material for discussion.
Listen to the audio review based on the JAH web review by Tracey Weis:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Don Mabry’s Historical Text Archive
Don Mabry, Professor Emeritus, Mississippi State University.
Provides more than 5,100 links to historical texts, with more than 1,600 on U.S. history topics. The latter are organized into subcategories according to time period, section, states, biographies, wars, presidents, foreign policy, and business history. Separate categories on women’s history and African-American history provide more than 80 and 140 links, respectively, while the Latin American category offers more than 400. More than 100 links pertain to teaching. The site allows visitors the opportunity to rate links and lists the date a link was added, number of hits, and rating. In addition, the site offers an eclectic collection of articles, books, documents, maps, and photographs in the following areas: Africa, African-Americans, Asia, Europe, Genealogy, Hungary, the Internet, Korean War, Latin America, Mexico, Persian Gulf, Religion, Rock ’n’ Roll, U.S., World War I, and World War II. The U.S. section includes 63 articles, most of which deal with wars, international relations, and American Indians. The site’s creator is a professor of history at the University of Mississippi. Valuable primarily for the links.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas: A Visual Record
Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite Jr., University of Virginia.
See JAH web review by Christer Petley.
Reviewed 2013-03-01.
This collection of more than 1,230 images depicts the enslavement of Africans, the Atlantic Slave Trade, and slave life in the New World. Images are arranged in 18 categories, including capture of slaves, maps, slave ships, plantation scenes, physical punishment, music, free people of color, family life, religion, marketing, rebellion, and emancipation. The category “Pre-colonial Africa: Society, Polity, Culture” contains 242 images; however, most categories have approximately 20 to 80 images. Many of the illustrations and paintings are from 17th and 18th-century books and travel accounts, but some are taken from sketches within slave narratives and Harper’s Weekly and Monthly Magazine. In addition to reference information, brief 20- to 100-word comments, often an excerpt from the caption, accompany each image. While there is no attempt to interpret the images, those studying American slave societies, especially the Caribbean and Latin America, will find this a useful site.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-20.

www.history
Images of Native Americans
Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley.
See JAH web review by Elizabeth Hutchinson.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
Created to celebrate the acquisition of the Library’s 9 millionth volume, James Otto Lewis’s The Aboriginal Port Folio, this presentation includes materials (more than 80 items) from rare books, pamphlets, journals, pulp magazines, newspapers, and original photographs. The illustrations reflect European interpretations of Native Americans, images of popular culture, literary and political observations, and artistic representations. The 3 main sections are “Portrayals of Native Americans,” "The Nine Millionth Volume,“ and a timeline. ”Portrayals“ is divided into 4 online galleries: Color Plate Books, Foreign Views, Mass Market Appeal, and Early Ethnography. The galleries incorporate the renowned works George Catlin and Edward S. Curtis, and the lesser-known works of early 19th-century Russian artist-explorer Louis Choris. ”Mass market“ features 32 illustrations (with descriptive text), including colorful images of western novel covers and portraits of southwestern Indians. ”Early ethnography“ contains a newspaper article about a Native American family, 5 photographs, and 15 illustrations of Indians at play and at war. ”The Nine Millionth Volume" is devoted to James Otto Lewis’s historic volume, The Aboriginal Port Folio, a series of hand-colored lithographic portraits of American Indian chiefs. Published in 1835–1836, the series was the first color plate publication of Native Americans. 15 of the original illustrations are available. An essay by Anthony Bliss, Curator of Rare Books and Literary Manuscripts, details the process of acquiring rare items. The digital exhibit also offers a timeline (1500 to 1990s) to help users view the materials in a chronological sequence. This site offers an informed viewer valuable material.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
American Journeys
Wisconsin Historical Society and National History Day.
Containing more than 18,000 first-hand accounts of North American and Canadian exploration, this website presents the stories of Vikings and diary etries through to the Rocky Mountain adventurers. The site makes 181 documents related to these explorations available, including rare books, original manuscripts, and classic travel narratives. In addition to reading the words and thoughts of numerous explorers, users can browse the full archive or browse by expedition or settlement, geographic region, and U.S. state or Canadian province. Each document is individually searchable and accompanied by a short background essay and a reference map. There are also 150 images available and can be browsed or searched. Clicking on a thumbnail image brings up a new window with a full-size image. The advanced search allows both topical subject searches and bibliographic searches to find documents by author, title, contributor, and other bibliographic data. “Highlights” allows the user to explore the collection chronologically by famous moments in American history, from ca. 1000 to 1806. Resources for teachers include two lesson plans, an essay on interpretation, suggested topics, and a resource book. Useful for researching or teaching the exploration of North America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-01.

www.history
The Story of Virginia
Virginia Historical Society .
This attractive website offers a presentation on the history of Virginia from prehistoric times to the present with essays, images, and teaching resources. There are ten chapters: the first Virginians; the settlement of colonial Virginia; Virginia’s society before 1775; Virginians in the American Revolution; Virginians as Southerners, Confederates, and New Southerners; Virginians in the 20th century; the struggles of African-American and female Virginians for equality; and a final chapter on images of Virginia in popular culture. Each chapter has an essay featuring images of relevant items in the collections of the Virginia Historical Society. The “resource bank” collects all 95 images from the chapters of people, documents, places, and objects. Additionally, the site offers a teacher’s guide for each chapter listing the standards of learning, a summary of key points, classroom activities and lesson plans, links to related websites, and information on tours, outreach programs, and hands-on-history programs. An excellent introduction to the history of Virginia and its people with useful resources for class projects and classroom instruction.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Lest We Forget: The Triumph Over Slavery
New York Public Library, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.
This attractive exhibit utilizes essays and more than 140 images to explore the 400-year history of slavery in the Americas. The site reminds us that together “the slave trade and slavery represented one of the longest, most sustained assaults on the dignity and self-worth of human beings in the history of humankind.” The site’s home page offers an introductory essay that presents the central themes of the exhibit. The site is centered around nine thematic presentations on the forging of common identities in slavery; the enslavement process in Africa; the transatlantic slave trade; slave labor and slave systems; the struggle against slavery and the abolition of slavery; family life and social development; religion; language, literacy, and education; and culture. Each image is accompanied by an explanatory caption. There is no search feature available on the site. An informative overview of slavery in the Americas, the site is also of interest to those studying African-American culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Alexander Street Press
Alexander Street Press.
*** For fee website. *** This website offers 16 separate databases of digitized materials that provide either first-hand accounts (diaries, letters, and memoirs) or literary efforts (poetry, drama, and fiction). Twelve databases pertain to American history and culture. “Early Encounters in North America: Peoples, Cultures, and the Environment” offers primary sources documenting cultural interactions from 1534 to 1850. “The American Civil War: Letters and Diaries” draws on more than 400 sources and supplies a day-by-day chronology with links to documents. “Black Thought and Culture” furnishes monographs, speeches, essays, articles, and interviews. “North American Immigrant Letters, Diaries, and Oral Histories” covers 1840 to the present. “North American Women’s Letters and Diaries: Colonial to 1950” provides full-text letters and diaries from more than 1,000 women—totaling more than 21,000 documents and approximately 120,000 pages—written between 1675 and 1950. Five databases present American literary writings: “Latino Literature: Poetry, Drama, and Fiction”; “Black Drama”; “Asian American Drama”; “North American Women’s Drama”; and “American Film Scripts Online.” In addition, “Oral History Online” provides a reference work with links to texts, audio, and video files. While the databases include previously published documents, many also contain thousands of pages of unpublished material. In addition to keyword searching, the databases provide “semantic indexing”—extensive categorical search capabilities.
Resources Available: IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-07.

www.history
Oxford African American Studies Center
Oxford African American Studies Center.
[subscription required] Designed for students, scholars, and librarians, this site provides access to thousands of primary source documents, maps, images, bibliographic entries, and subject entries drawn from reference resources in African American studies. Six published volumes furnish the majority of the resources: the Encyclopedia of African American History 1619–1895; Black Women in America, Second Edition; Africana, a five-volume history of the African and African American experience; the African American National Biography project, edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; the Encyclopedia of African American Art and Architecture; and the Concise Oxford Companion to African American Literature. These sources present a wealth of primary source documents, more than 1,000 images, and close to 100 maps, which illustrate events from 1500s South America through the Clinton Presidency. The site also includes more than 5,000 biographies and 3,000 subject entries on events and people, such as 19th-century African American midwives in the Western United States, prominent abolitionists, and charts on African American professional baseball. Useful for research, reference, and class projects on all aspects of African American history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.