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There are 190 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Digital History
Steven Mintz and Sara McNeil.
See JAH web review by Simon Appleford and Vernon Burton.
Reviewed 2008-03-01.
Provides multimedia resources and links for teaching American history and conducting basic research, while focusing on slavery, ethnic history, private life, technological achievement, and American film. Presents more than 600 documents pertaining to American politics, diplomacy, social history, slavery, Mexican American history, and Native American history, searchable by author, time period, subject, and keyword, and annotated with essays of 300–500 words each. The site offers a full U.S. history textbook and more than 1,500 searchable and briefly annotated links to American history-related sites, including approximately 150 links to historic Supreme Court decisions, 330 links to audio files of historic speeches, and more than 450 links to audio files and transcripts of historians discussing their own books. Also includes five high school lesson plans; 39 fact sheets with quotations and study questions on major historical topics; 10 essays (800 words) on past controversies, such as the Vietnam War, socialism, and the war on poverty; seven essays presenting historical background on more recent controversies, such as hostage crises and NATO in Kosovo; and essays of more than 10,000 words each on the history of American film and private life in America. Four current exhibits offer 217 photographs, ca. 1896–1903, from the Calhoun Industrial School in Alabama, a freedmen’s school; 19 watercolor sketches by a Civil War soldier; seven letters between 18th-century English historian Catharine Macaulay and American historian Mercy Otis Warren; and an 1865 letter from Frederick Douglass to Mary Todd Lincoln. A valuable site for high school students and teachers looking for comprehensive guidance from professional historians on the current state of debate on many topics in American history.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936–1940
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Thomas Thurston.
Reviewed 2001-09-01.
Approximately 2,900 life histories from 1936–1940 compiled and transcribed as part of the Federal Writers' Project for the U.S. Works Progress (later Work Projects) Administration (WPA)are featured on this site. Documents represent the work of more than 300 writers from 24 states. The histories, in the form of drafts and revisions, vary from narrative to dialog, report, or case history. A typical history describes an informant’s family, education, income, occupation, political views, religion and mores, medical needs, diet, and other observations on society and culture. Interviewers often substituted pseudonyms for names of individuals and places. The Special Presentation, “Voices from the Thirties”—adapted in part from the book First Person America by Ann Banks and illustrated with photographs of the Project’s staff at work, interviewees, and their environments—provides the context for the creation of the Life Histories Collection and includes excerpts from sample interviews. Visitors can select a particular U.S. state or search the archive by keyword. Life histories are presented in facsimiles of original interview documents and as searchable text. This multifaceted collection provides materials for teaching subjects such as slavery and 19th-century American folk cultures as well as social history of the Great Depression.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-25.

www.history
America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA-OWI, 1935–1945
American Memory, Library of Congress.
More than 160,000 images taken by government photographers with the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and the Office of War Information (OWI) during the New Deal and World War II eras are featured on this site. These images document the ravages of the Great Depression on farmers, scenes of everyday life in small towns and cities, and, in later years, mobilization campaigns for World War II. This site includes approximately 1,600 color photographs and selections from 2 extremely popular collections: “’Migrant Mother’ Photographs” and “Photographs of Signs Enforcing Racial Discrimination.” The site also provides a bibliography, a background essay of about 500 words, seven short biographical sketches of FSA-OWI photographers, links to 7 related sites, and 3 essays on cataloging and digitizing the collection. The photographs are searchable by keyword and arranged into a subject index.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
California as I Saw It: First-Person Narratives of California’s Early Years, 1849–1900
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by William E. Brown, Jr..
Reviewed 2002-09-01.
The 190 works presented on this site—approximately 40,000 written pages and more than 3,000 illustrations—provide eyewitness accounts covering California history from the Gold Rush through the end of the 19th century. Most authors represented are white, educated, male Americans, including reporters detailing Gold Rush incidents and visitors from the 1880s attracted to a highly-publicized romantic vision of California life. The narratives, in the form of diaries, descriptions, guidebooks, and subsequent reminiscences, portray “pioneer experience, encounters between Anglo-Americans and the diverse peoples who had preceded them, the transformation of the land by mining, ranching, agriculture, and urban development; the often-turbulent growth of communities and cities; and California’s emergence as both a state and a place of uniquely American dreams.” A map of California from 1900, texts, 20 illustrations and photographs, a bibliography for further reading, and a comprehensive discussion of the collection’s strengths and weaknesses provide useful context for first-person accounts. A special presentation recounts early California history illustrated with paintings, engravings, and photographs.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
Touring Turn-of-the-Century America: Photographs from the Detroit Publishing Company, 1880–1920
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Marguerite S. Shaffer.
Reviewed 2004-07-01.
The Detroit Publishing Company was a mass producer of photographic images—especially color postcards, prints, and albums—for the American market from the late 1890s to 1924, the year it went into receivership. This collection of more than 25,000 glass negatives and transparencies and about 300 color photolithograph prints also includes images taken prior to the establishment of the company by landscape photographer William Henry Jackson, who joined the company in 1897 and became its president the following year. Jackson’s earlier work documenting western sites influenced the conservation movement and influenced the establishment of various national parks, including Yellowstone. Although many images in this collection were taken in eastern locations, other areas of the U.S., the Americas, and Europe are represented. The collection specializes in views of buildings, streets, colleges, universities, natural landmarks, resorts, and copies of paintings. More than 300 photographs were taken in Cuba during the period of the Spanish-American War. About 900 Mammoth Plate Photographs include views taken by Jackson of Hopi peoples and their crafts, landscapes along several railroad lines in the United States and Mexico in the 1880s and 1890s, and at other sites in California and Wyoming; and by Henry Greenwood Peabody of the Canadian Rockies.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota.
See JAH web review by Joel Perlmann.
Reviewed 2003-06-01.
Currently provides 22 census data samples and 65 million records from 13 federal censuses covering the period 1850–1990. These data “collectively comprise our richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population.” The project has applied uniform codes to previously published and newly created data samples. Rather than offering data in aggregated tabular form, the site offers data on individuals and households, allowing researchers to tailor tabulations to their specific interests. Includes data on fertility, marriage, immigration, internal migration, work, occupational structure, education, ethnicity, and household composition. Offers extensive documentation on procedures used to transform data and includes 13 links to other census-related sites. A complementary project to provide multiple data samples from every country from the 1960s to 2000 is underway. Currently this international series offers information and interpretive essays on Kenya, Vietnam, Mexico, Hungary, and Brazil. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social history, the site will probably be forbidding to novices.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Thomas Jefferson Digital Archive
University of Virginia Library.
See JAH web review by Robert M. S. McDonald.
Reviewed 2004-12-01.
Provides more than 1,700 texts—correspondence, books, addresses, and a variety of public papers—written by or to Thomas Jefferson. Most texts are presented in transcribed, word-searchable format; 18 appear as color images of original manuscripts. The site also includes a biography of Jefferson written in 1834, eight years after his death. The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia, published in 1900, organizes more than 9,000 quotes according to theme and other categories. A collection of 2,700 excerpts from Jefferson’s writings present his political philosophy. A wealth of searchable bibliographic listings is provided, including two previously published volumes and thousands of additional bibliographic references. Also contains a recent dissertation on the construction of the Jefferson-designed University of Virginia (UVA), listings from the Oxford English Dictionary that show Jefferson’s influence on English language usage, and four links to UVA exhibitions on Jefferson. Extremely valuable for the study of Jefferson and the period of the early republic.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Digital Library of Georgia
University of Georgia Libraries.
Provides an enormous amount of material digitized from collections housed in libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions in the state of Georgia. Legal materials include more than 17,000 public state government documents from 1994 to the present, updated daily, and a complete set of Acts and Resolutions from 1799 to 1995. A set of “Southeastern Native American Documents” provides approximately 2,000 letters, legal documents, military orders, financial papers, and archeological images covering the period 1730–1842. Materials from the Civil War-era include a soldier’s diary and two collections of letters, one from the wife of an Atlanta lawyer and plantation owner. The site provides a collection of 80 full-text, word-searchable versions of books from the early nineteenth century to the 1920s and three historic newspapers. The site also includes approximately 2,500 political cartoons by Clifford H. “Baldy” Baldowski, from 1946–1982; copies from a first-hand account of a violent incident of civil unrest during a political rally in 1868; Jimmy Carter’s diaries of 1971–75 and 1977–81; annual reports of the mayor of Savannah, 1865–1917; photographs of African Americans from around Augusta in the late 19th century; and 1,500 architectural and landscape photographs from the 1940s to the 1980s. A valuable collection for students of southern life, politics, law, and culture.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Plymouth Colony Archive Project
Patricia Scott Deetz, Christopher Fennell, and J. Eric Deetz, University of Virginia.
See JAH web review by John Saillant.
Reviewed 2004-06-01.
Presents a wealth of documents and analytical essays pertaining to the social history of Plymouth Colony from 1620 to 1691. Also offers a tribute to the scholarly work of the late James Deetz, Harrison Professor of Historical Archaeology, University of Virginia. Documents include 135 probates, 24 wills, and 14 texts containing laws and court cases on such subjects as land division, master-servant relations, sexual misconduct, and disputes involving Native Americans. In addition, the site provides more than 90 biographical studies, research papers and topical articles by James Deetz, Patricia Scott Deetz, and their students that analyze “life ways” of 395 individuals who lived in the colony and offer theoretical views on the colony’s legal structure, women’s roles, vernacular house forms, and domestic violence, among other topics. Includes 25 maps or plans of the colony; approximately 50 photographs; excerpts from Deetz’s books on the history and myths of Plymouth Colony and on Anglo-American gravestone styles; seven lesson plans; an extensive glossary of archaeological terms; and tributes to Deetz. Valuable for those interested in historical anthropology, material culture studies, and American colonial history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-09.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
First American West: The Ohio River Valley, 1750–1820
American Memory, Library of Congress; University of Chicago Library; and Filson Historical Society.
Provides approximately 15,000 pages of historical published and unpublished manuscript material related to the migration of Europeans west into the Ohio River Valley during the latter half of the 18th century and beginning of the 19th. Includes books, pamphlets, newspapers, periodicals, journals, letters, legal documents, pictorial images, maps, ledgers, and other types of material. The collection, from the University of Chicago Library and Filson Historical Society of Louisville, Kentucky, was started in the late 19th century by a group dedicated to preserving documents related to Kentucky and Ohio River Valley history. The site includes a special presentation with a 6,500-word hyperlink-filled essay arranged into five sections on contested lands, peoples and migration, empires and politics, Western life and culture, and the construction of a Western past. The site offers materials on encounters between Europeans and native peoples, the lives of African-American slaves in the area, the role of institutions such as churches and schools, the position of women in this society, the thoughts of naturalists and other scientists, and activities of the migrants, including travel, land acquisition, planting, navigation of rivers, and trade. Well-known personages represented include Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr, James Madison, and William Henry Harrison. Includes a 26-title bibliography and annotated links to 19 related sites. Valuable for students and serious researchers of early American history, the history of cross-cultural encounters in the West, frontier history, and the construction of the nation’s past.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-19.

www.history
Centennial Celebration
Bureau of the Census.
To celebrate the centennial of the Census Bureau, this site provides access to a wealth of statistical information on the U.S. population. While most materials offer recent data, more than 30 comprehensive reports and tables are included that track decade-by-decade demographic-related shifts, including urban and rural population change, population of the largest 100 cities, population density, and homeownership rates. Additional material details shifts in U.S. international trade in goods and services from 1960–2000; poverty from 1959–2000; race and Hispanic origin of foreign-born populations from 1850–1990; interracial married couples from 1960–1998; and marital status of women at first birth from 1930–1994. Visitors can find current detailed information on social and economic characteristics of African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indian and Alaska Natives, and of baby boomers. The North American Industry Classification System offers recent economic data on eight business sectors. American FactFinder offers detailed maps with demographic information for individual blocks and for larger areas. Yearly editions of Statistical Abstract of the United States from 1995 to 2001 are included, along with charts of demographic information according to categories such as age, ancestry, and income. In addition, the site provides a collection of “fast facts” for each decade of the 20th century, four historical timelines, and approximately 20 photographs related to the census. Valuable for students and professional historians needing demographic and other statistical information on population trends.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-04.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
University of Nebraska Press; Center for Great Plains Studies; UNL Libraries.
See JAH web review by Leonard J. Sadosky.
Reviewed 2009-06-01.
This well-designed site presents the “celebrated Nebraska edition of the Lewis and Clark journals,” edited by Gary E. Moulton, providing the complete text of all the journals from the 1803 to 1806 expedition, as well as introductions, prefaces, and sources. The material is searchable by keyword and phrase. There are 29 scholarly essays about the expedition. An image gallery offers more than 124 images of pages from the journals, 95 images of people and places, and 50 images of plants and animals encountered on the expedition. The maps section includes 12 explanatory maps and 9 images of maps from the journals. Additionally, there are 27 audio excerpts of journal readings and 8 video interviews with the editor of the project. An outstanding resource for researching the history of the Lewis and Clark expedition.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-03.

www.history
Raid on Deerfield: The Many Stories of 1704
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association (PVMA) and Memorial Hall Museum.
See JAH web review by Richard Rabinowitz.
Reviewed 2005-09-01.
This outstanding site documents the 1704 raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts, by 300 French and their Native American allies. During the raid, 112 Deerfield men, women, and children were captured and forced to march 300 miles to Canada during winter. Eventually, about two-thirds of the captives were released and returned to Deerfield, while one-third remained with their captors. Visitors are introduced to the raid by an impressive multimedia exhibit, describing the white settlement patterns that led to profound cross-cultural tensions. Backgrounds includes fifteen short (500- to 1000-word) essays that give historical background and context on the colonization of New England, as well as the various tensions between white settlers and Native Americans. Voices and Songs provides a 5-part audio commentary for the 300th anniversary of the raid, 3 audio versions of Native American creation stories, 5 seventeenth century popular songs, eight selections of 17th- and 18th- century French music, and excerpts from the opera The Captivation of Eunice Williams. 5 Cultures includes brief introductions to each of the five cultural groups involved: English, French, Mohawk, Huron, and Wobanaki. The 5 cultures are also represented in the 28 individual biographies historians and archaeologists have been able to reconstruct, including Native Americans, French, and English settlers. Maps includes a dozen maps, including Native American territories and interactive maps of the raid and the march to Canada. After viewing and reading the evidence, visitors are asked to decide whether the raid was part of a larger pattern of cross-cultural violence or an aberration.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-29.

www.history
Lakota Winter Counts
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
See JAH web review by Danielle Moretti-Langholtz and Buck Woodard.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
An exhibit displaying, explaining, and interpreting the Lakota pictorial histories known as winter counts. The website features a searchable database of winter count images, a documentary about Lakota history and culture, video interviews with Lakota people, and a teacher’s guide. (The exhibit requires Flash 6.0 but an html version is available.) Visitors can view images from 10 winter counts and examine their symbols in detail by year with curator comments on individual symbols. Visitors are also able to examine the various symbols used by the winter count keepers to represent plants and animals, ceremonies, health, trade goods, places, people, the U.S. government, and the sky. A second section of the site explains winter counts and the history of those Lakota who kept them for their bands. The “Who Are the Lakota” section offers a historical overview of Lakota history in 10 segments that include the Lakota and the Sioux people, Lakota origins, westward migration, horse-centered culture on the northern Great Plains, important conflicts and treaties, confinement to the Great Sioux Reservation, and subsequent land cessions. Additionally, six interviews with Lakota men and women offer contemporary perspectives. Finally, the teacher’s guide includes topics for discussion, an annotated bibliography with four books and six websites, and one lesson plan each for the elementary, middle-school, and high-school levels. In addition to highlighting the winter counts, this site is an outstanding resource for teaching and learning about the Lakota people and their culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
Early American Newspapers: Series 1, 1690–1876
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This archive provides full-text access to more than 350,000 issues of more than 700 newspapers from 23 states and the District of Columbia. The majority of the collection focuses on the 18th and 19th centuries, and sheds light onto a wide range of political, social, cultural, and economic issues in both cities and smaller communities. The New York collection, for example, boasts 157 titles. While 80 of these were published in New York City, the collection also includes newspapers published in Troy, Utica, Catskill, and Ithaca. Massachusetts (137 titles), Pennsylvania (84 titles), Connecticut (47 titles), and Vermont (41 titles) are also well represented, followed by New Hampshire, Maryland, Virginia, South Carolina, and Rhode Island. Keyword searching capabilities combined with extensive browsing options allow both experienced researchers and those largely unfamiliar with early American history to make good use of the resources available here. Browsing options include dates and eras, article types (including news; poetry/songs; advertisements; birth, death, and marriage notices; cartoons and illustrations; maps; letters; and election returns), languages, places of publication, and newspaper titles. Newspapers are displayed as full-page scans, enabled with detailed zoom capabilities, and can be downloaded in .pdf format.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2009-07-30.

www.history
U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817–1980
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This vast archive includes many documents and reports produced by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives and published between 1817 and 1980, for a total of more than 355,000 items. These items include 48,000 maps, 9,000 illustrations, thousands of reports, and numerous records of committee hearings and floor proceedings. All items are full-text searchable and can be browsed by subject, such as education, economics, food and agriculture, health, Indian affairs, armed forces and conflicts, environment and natural resources, and social issues. Within each of these broad categories, there are hundreds of subject headings, such as “animal welfare” (83 items), “alien labor” (306 items), and “ordnance testing” (353 items). The “Indian Affairs” category, for example, presents thousands of items on agencies and organizations relating to Indian affairs, Indian reservations, treaties, names of Indian tribes, as well as documents relating to hundreds of laws and supreme court cases. There is also a bill number search, an alphabetical list of names of all acts of Congress, and a listing of all documents by U.S. Congress session. All documents can be downloaded in .pdf format. In addition, a separate browse feature entitled “Serial Set Maps” facilitates access to thousands of maps from counties and cities across the country. Many of these date to the Civil War-era or later and include images of forts and depictions of field operations. Readex plans to expand coverage through 1994.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-08-19.

www.history
Early American Imprints, Series II: Shaw-Shoemaker, 1801–1819
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This database is the most essential collection of written materials for historical research in American history from 1801–1819. It provides full-text access to nearly 4.5 million pages of 36,000 books, pamphlets, broadsides and other imprints published in the U.S. during this period. Gazetteers, almanacs, juvenile literature, chapbooks, hymnals, campaign literature, novels, slave narratives, spelling books, school readers, treaties, maps, atlases, advertisements, diaries, autobiographies, and much more are all included. Most of these materials were originally detailed in the bibliography compiled by Ralph Shaw and Richard Shoemaker. This collection, long available on microfiche, is made available here as a digital, fully searchable online database. It complements Readex’s other Early American Imprints series of material from the period of 1639–1800.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2006-09-06.

www.history
Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project
James N. Gregory, University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Peter Cole.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This collection of hundreds of primary sources documents the long history of struggle for equal rights by various ethnic group sin Seattle, including Filipino, Chinese, Japanese and Native Americans, Jews, Latinos, and African Americans. The website integrates labor rights movements with struggles for political rights, as is evident in “special sections” that highlight the Chicano/a movement, the Black Panther Party, Filipino Cannery Unionism, the United Construction Workers Association, Communism, and the United Farm Workers. Each section brings together oral histories, documents, newspapers, and photographs that are accompanied by written and video commentary to provide historical context. The collection of more than 70 oral histories of activists is especially useful for understanding the lived experience of racism and its especially subtle workings in the Pacific Northwest. Together, these resources provide important national context for the civil rights struggle, too often understood as a solely southern phenomenon.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2006-11-22.

www.history
Seattle Black Panther Party History and Memory Project
Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project.
In 1968, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense established a chapter in Seattle, one of the first outside of California. This website, devoted to portraying the history and collecting the memories of that chapter, is “the most extensive online collection of materials” for any Black Panther Party chapter. It includes 13 oral histories and brief biographies of key Black Panther Party members, 53 photographs documenting Black Panther events in the late 1960s, more than 100 news stories covering Party activities from 1968 to 1981 (four years after the Party was dissolved), testimony and exhibits from the 1970 Congressional Hearings investigating the Party, and all five issues of the Seattle Black Panther Party “Bulletin.” A “Slide Show” highlighting some of these materials is a good place to begin for those unfamiliar with Black Panther Party history. This website is part of the larger Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project, which provides extensive materials that can serve as historical context, such as a guide to Civil Rights groups from the 1910s to the 1970s, 14 2,000-word essays on the ethnic press in Seattle, 13 other “Special Sections” on topics such as segregation in Seattle, and 37 in-depth essays on historical topics such as the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s. In addition, a “For Teachers” section provides eight lesson plans using the website’s material for middle and high school students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2009-02-05.

www.history
The American Image: The Photographs of John Collier Jr.
Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico.
In 1941, the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information (FSA/OWI) hired photographer John Collier Jr. to document ordinary life in America, focusing on civil defense and public morale. This website presents more than 300 of the photographs Collier took for this two-year assignment. These photographs span the country from New Mexico to Maine, and portray farm work, family life, industrial works, military recruitment and training, cityscapes, mining and other labor, religious and leisure activities, schooling, as well as Native American communities. To complement these photographs, the website also includes several interactive activities. “Active Looking” is a guided examination of photographs that pushes users to think about the authorship, composition, and purpose of photographs. In “The Shooting Script,” users compare one of Collier’s photographs to a contemporary photograph with a similar subject, learning about the importance of historical context and the photographer’s process. “Propaganda Filmmaker” allows users to make their own short film using Collier’s photographs as well as posters and video clips from other websites. A teacher’s guide for all activities is also available.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-10.

www.history
Dime Novels and Penny Dreadfuls
Stanford University.
Presents more than 2,300 images of front and back covers as well as nine full-text selections of American “dime novels,” their British counterparts, the “penny dreadfuls,” and weekly story papers that flourished in the mid- to late-19th century. Contents selected from Stanford University’s Dime Novel and Story Paper Collection. The site offers three “guided tours”—consisting of selected images and essays of approximately 1,500 words each—on print processes; publishers, authors, and fictional heroes; and the entire Stanford Collection. The full-text selections include stories starring such heroes as Nick Carter, Buffalo Bill, Jesse James, Deadwood Dick, Fred Fearnot, and Calamity Jane. The site provides basic information on each title—a few sentences on plot and publishing history—and includes indexing according to various features: subject, genre, setting, intended audience age and gender, and type of graphic material. At present, searching functions are not available, but users may browse images by title and feature. Subject indexing of cover iconography is especially valuable as listings are organized according to depictions of ethnicity/nationality, occupation, types of places, types of sports and recreations, types of violence, and types of gestures and actions classified according to gender of character portrayed. Includes a 27-title bibliography and an annotated timeline. Very valuable for those studying 19th-century American popular culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
George Catlin and His Indian Gallery
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Renwick Gallery.
George Catlin, a lawyer turned painter, traveled throughout the American West in the early 19th century to chronicle the Native American experience. His paintings of the Plains Indians are the center of this virtual exhibit. From 1830 to 1836, Catlin visited more than 50 tribes from North Dakota to Oklahoma. His original Indian Gallery was designed to document the transformation of Native Americans and “rescue from oblivion” their customs and lifestyle. Thirty-three of Catlin’s more than 400 paintings are presented in this virtual museum, including one of William Clark, the famous explorer of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Designed for middle school and high school teachers the “classroom” section offers lesson plans that incorporate George Catlin’s paintings, Native American artifacts, and primary documents to teach students about early American history, geography, and art appreciation. The lesson plans are thematic and feature scholarly commentaries on the life and work of Catlin. A valuable resource for teaching about the Indian Removal of the 1830s, the transformation of the Western frontier, and the encounter of Anglo American and Native American cultures.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Alabama Maps
Department of Geography, University of Alabama.
This site contains more than 3,500 scanned and digitized maps divided into two indexes—historical and contemporary. The historical maps index contains several sections. The most voluminous section, “Alabama,” is divided into time periods, geological features, Alabama counties, rivers, and state highways. Another section indexes 13 other southeastern states, including Texas, the Carolinas, and Florida. There are also maps of the Western Hemisphere, North America, Mexico, and the Caribbean, some dating before 1700. An especially valuable feature of the historical index is the “Special Topics” which contains maps of the Civil War, including the battles in Gettysburg and Antietam, railroad routes, and ten Native American maps, mostly illustrating the boundaries of Cherokee territories. The contemporary map index is divided into eighteen themes, including education, housing, politics, federal expenditures, climate, and recreation. There are more than 100 world maps of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the South Pacific. Users will also find links to the University of Alabama’s Department of Geography and the publications of the Cartographic Laboratory. Created for educators and the business community, this is valuable resource for those researching the history of Alabama or contemporary themes in Alabama, the United States, and the world.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Map Collections: 1500–2003
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site presents a large number of maps from the 16th century to the present day focusing on Americana and “cartographic treasures.” The materials are organized into seven thematic categories—“Cities and Towns”; “Conservation and Environment”; “Discovery and Exploration”; “Cultural Landscapes”; “Military Battles and Campaigns”; “Transportation and Communication”; and “General Maps.” Sections include a number of “special presentations,” including several essays ranging from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Users may zoom in to view details and download maps. 17 specific map collections contained within this larger site are described in detail in the following History Matters entries: “Discovery and Exploration”; “The American Revolution and Its Era”; “Railroad Maps, 1828–1900”; “American Colonization Society Collection: Maps of Liberia, 1830–1870”; “Panoramic Maps, 1847–1929”; “Civil War Maps”; and “Mapping the National Parks.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
History: The National Park Service
U.S. National Park Service.
Historical aspects of many of the 384 areas under the National Park Service’s stewardship are presented in this expansive site. A “Links to the Past” section contains more than 25 text and picture presentations on such diverse history-related topics as archeology, architecture, cultural groups and landscapes, historic buildings, and military history. Of particular interest to teachers, a section entitled “Teaching with Historic Places” features more than 60 lesson plans designed “to enliven the teaching of history, social studies, geography, civics, and other subjects” by incorporating National Register of Historic Places into educational explorations of historic subjects. Examples include an early rice plantation in South Carolina; the lives of turn-of-the-century immigrant cigar makers near Tampa, Florida; a contrast between the Indianapolis headquarters of African-American businesswoman Madam C. J. Walker and a small store in Kemmerer, Wyoming, that grew into the J. C. Penney Company, the first nationwide department store chain; the Civil War Andersonville prisoner of war camp; President John F. Kennedy’s birthplace; the Liberty Bell; Finnish log cabins in Iowa; and the Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Saugus Iron Works. Especially useful for teachers interested in connecting the study of history with historic sites.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.