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There are 136 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
New Deal Network
Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute and Institute for Learning Technologies, Teachers College, Columbia University.
See JAH web review by Charles Forcey.
Reviewed 2002-03-01.
A database of more than 20,000 items relating to the New Deal. A “Document Library” contains more than 900 newspaper and journal articles, speeches, letters, reports, advertisements, and other textual materials, treating a broad array of subjects relevant to the period’s social, cultural, political, and economic history, while placing special emphasis on New Deal relief agencies and issues relating to labor, education, agriculture, the Supreme Court, and African Americans. The “Photo Gallery” of more than 5,000 images is organized into five units—“Culture,” “Construction,” “Social Programs,” “Federal Agencies,” and miscellaneous, including photos from 11 exhibitions and five series of photoessays, and images of disaster relief and public figures. The site additionally offers featured exhibits, many with lesson plan suggestions. Presently, the features section includes “The Magpie Sings the Depression,” a collection of 193 poems, articles, and short stories, and 275 graphics from a Bronx high school journal published between 1929 and 1941 with juvenile works by novelist James Baldwin, photographer Richard Avedon, cultural critic Robert Warshow, and film critic Stanley Kauffmann; “Dear Mrs Roosevelt” with selected letters written by young people to the first lady; “Student Activism in the 1930s,” which contains 38 photographs, graphics, and editorial cartoons, 12 American Student Union memoirs, 40 autobiographical essays, and a 20,000-word essay by Robert Cohen on 1930s campus radicalism; 17 selected interviews from American slave narratives gathered by the Works Progress Administration; and an illustrated essay on the history and social effects of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Includes approximately 100 annotated links to related sites. Of great value for teachers, students, and researchers interested in the social history of the New Deal era.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-18.

www.history
George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741–1799
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Susan Holbrook Perdue.
Reviewed 2008-06-01.
This collection of approximately 65,000 documents written by or to George Washington is the largest collection of original Washington documents in the world. It includes “correspondence, letterbooks, commonplace books, diaries, journals, financial account books, military records, reports, and notes accumulated by Washington from 1741 through 1799.” The site is searchable by keyword, and the range of documents make it an extremely rich source. Unfortunately, many of the documents are available only as page images—often with difficult to decipher handwriting—rather than as transcribed text. Transcripts, however, do exist for all of the diary pages and for additional selected documents. The site includes a number of helpful features: a timeline with annotations to relevant documents; a 1,500-word essay on Washington’s letterbooks; an essay entitled “Creating the American Nation,” with annotations on eight selected documents spanning Washington’s lifetime; a 8,500-word essay on his diaries; an 11,500-word essay on the publication history of Washington’s papers; and a 4,500-word essay on Washington’s career as a surveyor and mapmaker. “Because of the wide range of Washington’s interests, activities, and correspondents, which include ordinary citizens as well as celebrated figures, his papers are a rich source for almost every aspect of colonial and early American history.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
Ad*Access
Digital Scriptorium, Duke University.
See JAH web review by Kelly Schrum.
Reviewed 2001-09-01.
This well-developed, easily navigated site presents images and database information for more than 7,000 advertisements printed primarily in the United States from 1911 to 1955. Material is drawn from the J. Walter Thompson Company Competitive Advertisements Collection of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History at Duke University. The advertisements are divided into 5 main subjects areas: Radio (including radios, radio parts, and radio programs); Television (including television sets and programs); Transportation (including airlines, rental cars, buses, trains, and ships); Beauty and Hygiene (including cosmetics, soaps, and shaving supplies); and World War II (U.S. Government ads, such as V-mail or bond drives). The ads are searchable by keyword, type of illustration, and special features. A timeline from 1915 to 1955 provides general context for the ads with a chronology of major events. “About Ad Access” provides an overview of advertising history and the Duke collection, as well as a bibliography and list of advertising repositories in the U.S. Excellent archive of primary documents for students of consumer and popular culture. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-10.

www.history
Architecture and Interior Design for 20th-Century America: Photographs by Samuel Gottscho and William Schleisner, 1935–1955
American Memory, Library of Congress.
A photo archive of more than 29,000 images, produced by architectural photographers Samuel Gottscho and William Schleisner. Gottscho and Schleisner were commissioned to document the work of architects, sculptors, and artists for individuals and institutional clients, such as House Beautiful and House and Garden magazines. The collection specializes in views taken primarily in the northeastern United States—many in the New York City area—and in Florida. Subjects include homes, stores, offices, factories, and historic buildings. Also of note are 100 color images of the 1939–1940 New York World’s Fair. As the introductory text points out, the assembled group of photographs can "serve as a document of social change from a particular vantage point of the middle and upper classes of society."
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2003-11-10.

www.history
Washington As It Was: Photographs by Theodor Horydczak, 1923–1959
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Zachary M. Schrag.
Reviewed 2005-09-01.
Presents approximately 14,350 photographs by Theodor Horydczak (1890–1971), most of which document the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area between the 1920s and 1950s. Subjects include the architecture and interiors of government, commercial, and residential buildings; views of streets and neighborhoods; images of work and leisure; and events such as the 1932 Bonus March and the 1933 World Series. Also includes a limited number of shots taken in other U.S. locations and in Canada and a background essay, “Discovering Theodor Horydczak’s Washington.” Provides visual documentation of official and everyday life in the nation’s capital and its environs.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota.
See JAH web review by Joel Perlmann.
Reviewed 2003-06-01.
Currently provides 22 census data samples and 65 million records from 13 federal censuses covering the period 1850–1990. These data “collectively comprise our richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population.” The project has applied uniform codes to previously published and newly created data samples. Rather than offering data in aggregated tabular form, the site offers data on individuals and households, allowing researchers to tailor tabulations to their specific interests. Includes data on fertility, marriage, immigration, internal migration, work, occupational structure, education, ethnicity, and household composition. Offers extensive documentation on procedures used to transform data and includes 13 links to other census-related sites. A complementary project to provide multiple data samples from every country from the 1960s to 2000 is underway. Currently this international series offers information and interpretive essays on Kenya, Vietnam, Mexico, Hungary, and Brazil. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social history, the site will probably be forbidding to novices.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps of South Carolina
University of South Carolina Libraries Digital Collections.
See JAH web review by John M. Sherrer and Helena Ferguson.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
The 580 maps of more than 80 South Carolina towns and cities in this archive reveal urban landscapes and the locations of businesses, mills, colleges, depots, and other buildings between 1884 and 1923. The collection includes 232 unpublished, hand-drafted maps from the years 1899 to 1937. All maps are displayed with original color coding. Users can zoom in and out of maps and can pan right, left, up, or down to examine details. Every map is accompanied by bibliographic data. The full collection can be browsed or the user can choose to browse just the unpublished maps. The collection can be searched by city, year of publication, and county. The maps provide many details about mills and are particularly useful in revealing spatial relationships and location of railroad lines. There is also a link to the Union List of Sanborn and other fire insurance maps. An extremely useful resource for those researching the business or urban history of South Carolina in the decades around 1900.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Phillip Morris Advertising Archive
Philip Morris Incorporated.
See JAH web review by Pamela Walker Laird.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
More than 55,000 color images of tobacco advertisements from litigated cases, dating back to 1909, are now available on this site, created as a stipulation of the Master Settlement Agreement between the tobacco industry and various states’ attorneys general. In addition, more than 26 million pages of documents concerning “research, manufacturing, marketing, advertising and sales of cigarettes, among other topics” are provided in linked sites to the four tobacco companies involved—Philip Morris, R. J. Reynolds, Lorillard, and Brown and Williamson—and to two industry organizations, the Tobacco Institute and the Council for Tobacco Research. Ads and documents can be accessed by date, brand name, title words, and persons mentioned, among other searchable fields. Images can be magnified and rotated. An important site for those studying the historical uses of advertising to promote smoking and those with a more general interest in some of the motifs in ad texts and images that have become part of 20th-century American life.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Home for a membership organization of more than 500 colleges and universities worldwide, this site provides “access to a vast archive of social science data for research and instruction.” Data offered is in a variety of sociological and political areas, including census enumerations; urban and community studies; conflict, violence, and wars; economic behavior; legal systems; legislative bodies; mass political behavior and attitudes; and organizational behavior. While much of the site emphasizes the late twentieth century, data sets such as “Historical and Contemporary Electoral Processes” and “1790–1960 Censuses” will be useful to studies of earlier periods. Includes five special topic archives with data in linked sites geared to health, education, aging, criminal justice, and substance abuse and mental health concerns. Also provides 45 links to related sites. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social and political history. The site plans in the future to introduce “a set of pages that focuses on the needs and interests of novice data users.”
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-22.

www.history
WTO History Project
University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Patrick F. Gillham.
Reviewed 2013-09-01.
Designed to provide access now and in the future to documents created by groups that protested the World Trade Organization’s “Ministerial Week,” held in Seattle from November 29-December 3, 1999. Offers texts of more than 80 oral histories of organizers and participants, 73 photographs, and images of 224 fliers, posters, and leaflets. Also includes 46 planning documents, 18 signs carried by protesters, two audio files, three videos, and a timeline documenting 520 events from March to December 1999. A second timeline covers the week of protests and a table with contact information for more than 1,400 organizations that opposed the meetings. Documents in the collection can be searched by keyword, organizations, and issues—labor, environment, trade, democracy, direct action, food, agriculture, health, and independent media. The site’s creators state they are “dedicated to ensuring that any account ever written of the WTO protests be attentive to the range of people who turned out, the varieties of strategies and issues they brought to the streets and the meeting rooms, and the coalitions that emerged and failed.” As a result, the site will be of great value to those studying social protest movements in the late 20th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2003-11-29.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Core Historical Literature of Agriculture
Albert R. Mann Library, Cornell University.
See JAH web review by Steven Stoll.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
Currently this site presents full-text, word-searchable facsimiles of 1,850 monographs and 288 journal volumes related to agriculture published in the U.S. between 1806 and 1989. Evaluations and 4,500 core titles are detailed in the seven volume series The Literature of the Agricultural Sciences. Additional texts will be added to the site periodically. Fields of study covered include “agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, animal science, crops and their protection, food science, forestry, human nutrition, rural sociology, and soil science.” Types of materials include memoirs and transactions of early agricultural societies, newspapers, almanacs, agricultural periodicals, governmental publications, and archives of families, communities, and corporations. Users can search by author, title, subject, or keyword, then access a text’s title page, table of contents, index, or any particular page desired. Valuable for those studying the profound social, cultural, and economic effects of shifts in the history of American farming during the period covered.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-19.

www.history
Centennial Celebration
Bureau of the Census.
To celebrate the centennial of the Census Bureau, this site provides access to a wealth of statistical information on the U.S. population. While most materials offer recent data, more than 30 comprehensive reports and tables are included that track decade-by-decade demographic-related shifts, including urban and rural population change, population of the largest 100 cities, population density, and homeownership rates. Additional material details shifts in U.S. international trade in goods and services from 1960–2000; poverty from 1959–2000; race and Hispanic origin of foreign-born populations from 1850–1990; interracial married couples from 1960–1998; and marital status of women at first birth from 1930–1994. Visitors can find current detailed information on social and economic characteristics of African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indian and Alaska Natives, and of baby boomers. The North American Industry Classification System offers recent economic data on eight business sectors. American FactFinder offers detailed maps with demographic information for individual blocks and for larger areas. Yearly editions of Statistical Abstract of the United States from 1995 to 2001 are included, along with charts of demographic information according to categories such as age, ancestry, and income. In addition, the site provides a collection of “fast facts” for each decade of the 20th century, four historical timelines, and approximately 20 photographs related to the census. Valuable for students and professional historians needing demographic and other statistical information on population trends.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-04.

www.history
National Postal Museum
Smithsonian Institution.
See JAH web review by David Hochfelder.
Reviewed 2006-06-01.
Divided into six galleries, this website features 21 online exhibits. The first gallery, Binding the Nation, includes six exhibits such as "The Post and the Press“ and ”Moving West" that explains how the postal service contracted with stagecoach lines to transport mail across the frontier. The second gallery, Customers and Communities, uses a series of exhibits to examine the development of mail delivery to the growing urban and rural populations in the 20th century. For example, through a virtual tour of the "Mail by Rail" visitors learn about the revolutionary Railway Mail Service. Moving the Mail is the third gallery, with three exhibits, and Art of Cards and Letters, the fourth gallery, spotlights the important role mail has held as a medium for personal communications, including "Undercover: The Evolution of the American Envelope." The fifth gallery, Artistic License comprises six exhibits and the last, the Philatelic Gallery, includes exhibits entitled "Rarities Vault“ and ”Inverts.“ This gallery also features changing exhibits featuring special objects from both the Museum and private collections, including an online version of ”Mail to the Chief," a collection of original drawings by Franklin Roosevelt of the many stamps he designed. There are also two research guides online for the Benjamin B. Lipsner Airmail Collection and for the 1847 Federal Postage Stamp Correspondence. An Activity Zone offers materials for young students and free downloadable curriculum guides (grades K through college level) are available for teachers. The 24 online articles from EnRoute, the National Postal Museum’s membership magazine, complete this rich site.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2005-12-01.

www.history
Flint Sit-Down Strike
Historical Voices.
See JAH web review by Nancy Gabin.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This rich, multi-media resource provides an introduction to “the greatest strike in American history.” For those unfamiliar with the strike, the site includes a 300-word introductory essay with a 7-item bibliography and 7-item webography. It uses audio files that contain the actual voices of former strikers reminiscing about their experiences. The 3 main sections—organization, strike, and aftermath—provide nearly 100 audio memories accompanied by interview transcripts. Each main section also includes a descriptive essay of less than 1,000 words. In addition to the audio memories, there are slideshows, a Flash-generated strike map, and a timeline, each telling the strike story from a different perspective. For example, the site map focuses on the location of strike events, while the timeline offers a temporal vantage point. Users can zoom in and out of the map and click on a plant or icon to read about it and to hear audio clips pertaining to that location. This site offers a comprehensive oral history of the event and is a wonderful resource for high school and college history students and instructors.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-03.

www.history
In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.
See JAH web review by Clare Corbould.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This extensive, well-designed website features images, essays, lesson plans, and maps all focused on the movements of African Americans from the 1400s to the present. The site is built around the history of 13 African American migration experiences: the transatlantic slave trade (1450s-1867), runaway journeys (1630s-1865), the domestic slave trade (1760s-1865), colonization and emigration (1783–1910s), Haitian Immigration (1791–1809), Western migration (1840s-1970), Northern migration (1840s- 1890), the Great Migration (1916–1930), the Second Great Migration (1940–1970), Caribbean immigration (1900-present), the return South migration (1970-present), Haitian immigration in the 20th century (1970-present), and African immigration (1970-present). Each section includes an extensive image gallery with 60 or more images, two or more color maps and charts, an overview, short web essays on aspects of the migration with links to excerpts from various works on the subject, educational materials, a bibliography, and links to related websites. There are more than 67 detailed and informative color maps and more than 8,300 images available. Educational materials include at least two lesson plans (most have five or more) in each section and links to related resources. More than 90 lesson plans are available. An interactive timeline extends from the 15th to the 21st century and places migration in the context of U.S. history and the history of the African Diaspora. Searching is limited to a keyword search.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Business Plan Archive
Library of Congress; Center for History and New Media; University of Maryland Libraries.
A collection of business plans and planning information, this archive documents the “Birth of the Dot Com Era.“ Documents can be browsed (free registration required) by alphabetical listing of companies, document type, market sector, or market audience, or the archive can be searched by company name. An advanced search option is also available. Currently, there are 2,445 companies in the archive with one or more documents and more than 3,400 archived documents. Each company record includes a brief description of the company, historical information on the company (if available), and related documents. ”What We Can Learn“ offers three articles on the kinds of observations we can extract from the dot com boom and bust. ”Research Corner" offers tips on using the archive in the classroom, announcements, and other project news. Of particular interest are the entries on guidelines and recommendations for studying companies and for using the archive.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-06.

www.history
Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Georgia Towns and Cities, 1884–1922
Digital Library of Georgia .
See JAH web review by John M. Sherrer and Helena Ferguson.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
This extensive archive offers detailed color maps for more than 130 Georgia towns and cities between 1884 and 1922. The maps reveal urban landscapes and the locations of businesses, mills, colleges, depots, and other buildings. There are 540 sets of maps and most sets have several or more map sheets. For instance, Atlanta for 1911 has 395 map sheets covering the entire city with three index maps and Savannah for 1916 has 137 map sheets with two index maps. All maps are displayed with their original color coding. Users can zoom in and out and pan right, left, up, or down to reveal details and every map is accompanied by full bibliographic data. Visitors can browse the collection by county or city or by year of publication or they can search by keyword, title, city, county, or by address in listed cities. An advanced search feature is also available. Maps for each city are grouped by year with holdings indicated. There are also 17 related links that include two sites on how to read Sanborn maps and seven other digitized collections of Sanborn maps. The maps provide many details about the mills and other industries in these towns, and they are particularly useful in revealing spatial relationships and location of railroad lines. An extremely useful resource for researching the business or urban history of Georgia in the decades around 1900.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Selling the Computer Revolution: Marketing Brochures in the Collection
Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California.
A collection of more than 250 computer marketing brochures from 1948 to 1988, this collection visually represents more than 90 companies. Visitors can explore the entire collection or browse by company. Categories include: calculators, mainframes, minicomputers, personal computers, supercomputers; applications for which the computer was intended; and decade. Of particular interest are 6 early marketing brochures from Apple Computer, a brochure for the Commodore 64 computer, and two mid-1950s IBM brochures for “electronic data processing machines.” Each group of brochures is accompanied by a brief introduction with historical information about the company, category, type of application, or decade. A keyword search is also available. The full contents of each brochure are available for viewing or download in PDF format and each brochure is accompanied by descriptive data. This collection is of interest to those researching or teaching the history of science and technology or the history of marketing.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-07.

www.history
Early American Newspapers: Series 1, 1690–1876
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This archive provides full-text access to more than 350,000 issues of more than 700 newspapers from 23 states and the District of Columbia. The majority of the collection focuses on the 18th and 19th centuries, and sheds light onto a wide range of political, social, cultural, and economic issues in both cities and smaller communities. The New York collection, for example, boasts 157 titles. While 80 of these were published in New York City, the collection also includes newspapers published in Troy, Utica, Catskill, and Ithaca. Massachusetts (137 titles), Pennsylvania (84 titles), Connecticut (47 titles), and Vermont (41 titles) are also well represented, followed by New Hampshire, Maryland, Virginia, South Carolina, and Rhode Island. Keyword searching capabilities combined with extensive browsing options allow both experienced researchers and those largely unfamiliar with early American history to make good use of the resources available here. Browsing options include dates and eras, article types (including news; poetry/songs; advertisements; birth, death, and marriage notices; cartoons and illustrations; maps; letters; and election returns), languages, places of publication, and newspaper titles. Newspapers are displayed as full-page scans, enabled with detailed zoom capabilities, and can be downloaded in .pdf format.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2009-07-30.

www.history
Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project
James N. Gregory, University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Peter Cole.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This collection of hundreds of primary sources documents the long history of struggle for equal rights by various ethnic group sin Seattle, including Filipino, Chinese, Japanese and Native Americans, Jews, Latinos, and African Americans. The website integrates labor rights movements with struggles for political rights, as is evident in “special sections” that highlight the Chicano/a movement, the Black Panther Party, Filipino Cannery Unionism, the United Construction Workers Association, Communism, and the United Farm Workers. Each section brings together oral histories, documents, newspapers, and photographs that are accompanied by written and video commentary to provide historical context. The collection of more than 70 oral histories of activists is especially useful for understanding the lived experience of racism and its especially subtle workings in the Pacific Northwest. Together, these resources provide important national context for the civil rights struggle, too often understood as a solely southern phenomenon.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2006-11-22.

www.history
Readex Digital Collections
Newsbank.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Hundreds of thousands of documents spanning four centuries of American history are available in this large archive. Broadsides, ephemera, pamphlets, and booklets are available from 1639 to 1900. More than 1,300 newspaper titles, representing all fifty states, range in date from 1690 to 1922. U.S. Senate and House of Representatives reports, journals, and other documents are available from 1817 to 1980. Legislative and executive documents from the Early Republic are also included. The entire body of documents is keyword searchable, and, in addition, each collection can be searched and browsed individually. These documents shed light on many aspects of American social, political, economic, and cultural history, and can provide a valuable window into the daily lives of early Atlantic peoples. The collection of broadsides and ephemera is especially useful for exploring the history of printing in the United States, as all titles can be browsed by bookseller, printer, or publisher.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-31.

www.history
Medicine and Madison Avenue
Ellen Gartrell, National Humanities Center, and Digital Scriptorium, Duke University .
This exhibit is designed to help users better understand the evolution and complexity of health-related marketing in the 20th century. The project contains two different kinds of historical sources: a selection of more than 600 health-related advertisements printed in newspapers and magazines from 1910 to 1960 and supplementary documents. The advertisements have been organized around 6 categories: Household Products (45 items); Over-the-Counter Drugs (194 items); Personal and Oral Hygiene (184 items); Vitamins and Tonics, Food, Nutrition and Diet Aids (157 items); Institutional and Pharmaceutical (43 items); and Cigarette Ads (1 item). The 35 supplementary text documents include scanned images of internal reports from marketing companies, American Medical Association reports and editorials, Federal Trade Commission archival records, transcripts of 1930s radio commercials, and articles from medical journals. The project is designed for teachers and students in secondary schools, universities, and medical and public health programs. There are suggestions for how to use these primary documents in the classroom, including materials for case studies on Fleischmann’s Yeast, Listerine, and Scott Tissue. Users will also find the 85-item bibliography beneficial. This is an essential site for anyone interested in the history of modern advertising and modern medicine.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-24.

www.history
American History 102: Civil War to the Present
Stanley K. Schultz, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
This site reflects efforts to teach an American history survey course entirely through technology. Offers student lecture notes; 32 biographical sketches of prominent figures treated in the course, searchable by occupation, name, and era; bibliographic information; exams and review sheets; and a gallery of more than 200 photographs, many of which are taken from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The overall presentation is somewhat fragmented, but the site is rich in resources. Perhaps most valuable is a directory of history websites, organized by subject and time period. Professor Stanley Schultz and his associates have designed the site as a supplement for his videotaped lectures on the post-Civil War period.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
The Northern Great Plains, 1880–1920: Photographs from the Fred Hulstrand and F. A. Pazandak Photograph Collections
American Memory, Library of Congress and North Dakota State University.
Furnishes approximately 900 photographs from two collections at the Institute for Regional Studies at North Dakota State University. A professional photographer from northeastern North Dakota who sought to document the settlement of the Great Plains produced the “Fred Hulstrand History in Pictures Collection.” The “F. A. Pazandak Photography Collection” includes photographs taken by a southeastern North Dakota farmer as mechanization began to change his family farm. Images portray everyday rural and small town life, mostly from 1880–1920, and include shots of farmers, farm machinery, children, one-room schools, and workshops. The site also provides a historical overview of North Dakota, a 300-word history of farm machinery companies, and presentations entitled “Implements Used on the Farm,” “Schooling,” “Women,” “Sod Homes,” “Immigrants,” “Steam Engines and Tractors,” “Hired Hands,” and “Golden Age of Agriculture.” An annotated bibliography of 61 titles provides a guide for further research. This site includes important visual documentation on changes in rural communities and farming practices during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Taking the Long View: Panoramic Photographs, 1851–1991
American Memory, Library of Congress.
Nearly 4,000 panoramic photographs of cityscapes, landscapes, and group portraits, deposited as copyright submissions by more than 400 companies, are on display in this site. Panoramic photographs were used to advertise real estate and to document groups, events, and gatherings. Images depict all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and more than 20 foreign countries and territories; subjects include sports, transportation, military activities, agricultural life, natural disasters, college campuses, fairs, dams, bridges, canals, and theaters. Although the images cover the period from 1851 to 1991, the collection centers on the early 20th century. The site includes a 20-title bibliography, an illustrated 1,000-word background essay on the history of panoramic photography, and 500-word explorations of four specific photographers: George R. Lawrence (1869–1938); George N. Barnard (1819–1902); Frederick W. Brehm (1871–1950); and Miles F. Weaver (1879–1932). A useful collection for the documentation of geographic places as well as the depiction of groups and leisure activities.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-04.

www.history
History: The National Park Service
U.S. National Park Service.
Historical aspects of many of the 384 areas under the National Park Service’s stewardship are presented in this expansive site. A “Links to the Past” section contains more than 25 text and picture presentations on such diverse history-related topics as archeology, architecture, cultural groups and landscapes, historic buildings, and military history. Of particular interest to teachers, a section entitled “Teaching with Historic Places” features more than 60 lesson plans designed “to enliven the teaching of history, social studies, geography, civics, and other subjects” by incorporating National Register of Historic Places into educational explorations of historic subjects. Examples include an early rice plantation in South Carolina; the lives of turn-of-the-century immigrant cigar makers near Tampa, Florida; a contrast between the Indianapolis headquarters of African-American businesswoman Madam C. J. Walker and a small store in Kemmerer, Wyoming, that grew into the J. C. Penney Company, the first nationwide department store chain; the Civil War Andersonville prisoner of war camp; President John F. Kennedy’s birthplace; the Liberty Bell; Finnish log cabins in Iowa; and the Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Saugus Iron Works. Especially useful for teachers interested in connecting the study of history with historic sites.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.