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There are 243 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Great Chicago Fire and the Web of Memory
Chicago Historical Society and Northwestern University.
See JAH web review by Philip J. Ethington.
Reviewed 2002-06-01.
This exhibit, curated by Carl Smith, a professor at Northwestern University, commemorates the 125th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire (1871). Offers an array of primary sources selected from materials in the Chicago Historical Society and arranged into two sections. “The Great Chicago Fire” examines the fire through five chronological chapters, while a second section, “The Web of Memory,” focuses more specifically on the ways in which the fire has been remembered. This section is organized into six chapters, each devoted to a particular theme, including eyewitness accounts, popular illustrations, journal articles, “imaginative forms such as fiction and poetry and painting,” and the legend of Mrs. O’Leary. Both sections furnish galleries of images and artifacts, primary texts, “special media” such as songs, a newsreel, and an “Interactive Panorama of Chicago, 1858,” and chapter-specific, authoritative background essays that explore the social and cultural contexts of this catastrophe. Also includes a bibliography of 20 sources. A well-designed site that provides a wide range of diverse sources useful for studying Chicago in late 19th century and the ways that the story of the catastrophe subsequently has been told.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Remembering Jim Crow
American RadioWorks.
See JAH web review by Joseph Crespino.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
A companion site to the NPR radio documentary on segregated life in the South (broadcast in February 2002). Presents 30 audio excerpts, ranging from one minute to ten minutes in length, and approximately 130 photographs, arranged in six thematically-organized sections. Covers legal, social, and cultural aspects of segregation, black community life, and black resistance to the Jim Crow way of life. As anthropologist Kate Ellis, one of the site’s creators, notes, the interviews display a “marked contrast between African American and white reflections on Jim Crow.” Many of the photographs come from personal collections of the people interviewed. The site also includes 16 photographs taken by Farm Security Administration photographer Russell Lee in New Iberia, Louisiana. The site provides audio files and transcripts of the original radio documentary, more than 90 additional stories, a sampling of state segregation laws arranged by topic, links to 9 related sites, and a 41-title bibliography. The project creators—Ellis and personnel from American RadioWorks, the Minnesota Public Radio documentary producers—used interviews selected from more than 1,000 oral histories compiled by Duke University’s “Behind the Veil” project, in addition to conducting new interviews. The short 100-word introductions to each section succinctly provide a contextual framework to the documentary material. Valuable for those studying the American South, race relations, and African American history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Studs Terkel: Conversations with America
Chicago Historical Society .
See JAH web review by Clifford M. Kuhn.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
Part of the digital repository, Historical Voices, this site was created in honor of Studs Terkel, the noted oral historian, radio host of “The Studs Terkel Program,” and Pulitzer Prize-winning author. Dedicated to making Terkel’s 50 years of work available, it presents material pulled from approximately 5,000 hours of sound recordings. The seven galleries—The Studs Terkel Program; Division Street: America; Hard Times; The Good War; Race; Talking to Myself; and Greatest Hits—center on the extensive interviews Terkel completed for the radio show and his books and contain more than 400 audio clips of interviews. Most of the interviews are about 15 minutes in length and explore diverse subjects, including Chicago architecture, urban landscape, immigrants, street life, the 1929 stock market crash, organized labor, New Deal programs, race relations, and integration. Interviewees include Chicago architect Frank Lloyd Wright and labor activist Cesar Chavez as well as men and women on a train to Washington D.C. for the 1963 Civil Rights March. Sound recordings are searchable by date, keyword, or author. Complementing this site is an educational section intended to help students and teachers use oral history in the classroom and a 55-minute interview with Terkel. This well-designed site offers a rich history of many influential, as well as lesser-known, personalities living in the second half of the 20th century and is beneficial to anyone interested in the Great Depression, World War II, race relations, and labor issues.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-24.

www.history
America’s First Look into the Camera: Daguerreotype Portraits and Views, 1839–1864
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Paula Petrik.
Reviewed 2010-09-01.
This collection contains more than 725 photographs, most of them daguerreotypes produced at the Mathew Brady studio. The Brady images include portraits of prominent public figures, including President James K. Polk, Thomas Hart Benton, Thomas Cole, and Horace Greeley. The collection also includes the earliest known images of President and Mrs. Abraham Lincoln. Those not produced by the Brady studio daguerreotypes by African-American photographers, a few early architectural views taken in the Washington, D.C.-Baltimore area by John Plumbe, street scenes of Philadelphia, early portraits by Robert Cornelius, and copies of painted portraits. A short introduction to the daguerreotype medium and a “Timeline of the Daguerrian Era” provide additional context for the images. A special presentation, “Mirror Images: Daguerreotypes at the Library of Congress,” includes photographs from the American Colonization Society, occupational daguerreotypes, portraits, and architectural views. Useful for those studying 19th-century photography, visual culture, or art, as well as for viewing some of the earliest American photographs.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA-OWI, 1935–1945
American Memory, Library of Congress.
More than 160,000 images taken by government photographers with the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and the Office of War Information (OWI) during the New Deal and World War II eras are featured on this site. These images document the ravages of the Great Depression on farmers, scenes of everyday life in small towns and cities, and, in later years, mobilization campaigns for World War II. This site includes approximately 1,600 color photographs and selections from 2 extremely popular collections: “’Migrant Mother’ Photographs” and “Photographs of Signs Enforcing Racial Discrimination.” The site also provides a bibliography, a background essay of about 500 words, seven short biographical sketches of FSA-OWI photographers, links to 7 related sites, and 3 essays on cataloging and digitizing the collection. The photographs are searchable by keyword and arranged into a subject index.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
California Gold: Northern California Folk Music from the Thirties
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site features 35 hours of folk and popular music sound recordings from several European, Slavic, Middle Eastern, and English- and Spanish-speaking communities. The Work Projects Administration California Folk Music Project collected these 817 songs, in 12 languages and representing 185 musicians, in Northern California between 1938 and 1940. The collection also includes 168 photographs of musicians, 45 scale drawings and sketches of instruments, and numerous written documents, including ethnographic field reports and notes, song transcriptions, published articles, and project correspondence. Organized by folk music collector Sidney Robertson Cowell, sponsored by the University of California, Berkeley, and cosponsored by the Archive of the American Folk Song, this was one of the earliest ethnographic field projects to document folk and popular music of such diverse origin in one region. In addition to folk music of indigenous and immigrant groups, the collection includes popular songs from the Gold Rush and Barbary Coast eras, medicine show tunes, and ragtime numbers. In addition, short essays describe the California Folk Music Project and the ethnographic work of Sidney Robertson Cowell. This collection is an excellent resource for learning about ethnographic research practices as well as about cultures of various California ethnic groups.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
California as I Saw It: First-Person Narratives of California’s Early Years, 1849–1900
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by William E. Brown, Jr..
Reviewed 2002-09-01.
The 190 works presented on this site—approximately 40,000 written pages and more than 3,000 illustrations—provide eyewitness accounts covering California history from the Gold Rush through the end of the 19th century. Most authors represented are white, educated, male Americans, including reporters detailing Gold Rush incidents and visitors from the 1880s attracted to a highly-publicized romantic vision of California life. The narratives, in the form of diaries, descriptions, guidebooks, and subsequent reminiscences, portray “pioneer experience, encounters between Anglo-Americans and the diverse peoples who had preceded them, the transformation of the land by mining, ranching, agriculture, and urban development; the often-turbulent growth of communities and cities; and California’s emergence as both a state and a place of uniquely American dreams.” A map of California from 1900, texts, 20 illustrations and photographs, a bibliography for further reading, and a comprehensive discussion of the collection’s strengths and weaknesses provide useful context for first-person accounts. A special presentation recounts early California history illustrated with paintings, engravings, and photographs.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
Touring Turn-of-the-Century America: Photographs from the Detroit Publishing Company, 1880–1920
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Marguerite S. Shaffer.
Reviewed 2004-07-01.
The Detroit Publishing Company was a mass producer of photographic images—especially color postcards, prints, and albums—for the American market from the late 1890s to 1924, the year it went into receivership. This collection of more than 25,000 glass negatives and transparencies and about 300 color photolithograph prints also includes images taken prior to the establishment of the company by landscape photographer William Henry Jackson, who joined the company in 1897 and became its president the following year. Jackson’s earlier work documenting western sites influenced the conservation movement and influenced the establishment of various national parks, including Yellowstone. Although many images in this collection were taken in eastern locations, other areas of the U.S., the Americas, and Europe are represented. The collection specializes in views of buildings, streets, colleges, universities, natural landmarks, resorts, and copies of paintings. More than 300 photographs were taken in Cuba during the period of the Spanish-American War. About 900 Mammoth Plate Photographs include views taken by Jackson of Hopi peoples and their crafts, landscapes along several railroad lines in the United States and Mexico in the 1880s and 1890s, and at other sites in California and Wyoming; and by Henry Greenwood Peabody of the Canadian Rockies.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
Architecture and Interior Design for 20th-Century America: Photographs by Samuel Gottscho and William Schleisner, 1935–1955
American Memory, Library of Congress.
A photo archive of more than 29,000 images, produced by architectural photographers Samuel Gottscho and William Schleisner. Gottscho and Schleisner were commissioned to document the work of architects, sculptors, and artists for individuals and institutional clients, such as House Beautiful and House and Garden magazines. The collection specializes in views taken primarily in the northeastern United States—many in the New York City area—and in Florida. Subjects include homes, stores, offices, factories, and historic buildings. Also of note are 100 color images of the 1939–1940 New York World’s Fair. As the introductory text points out, the assembled group of photographs can "serve as a document of social change from a particular vantage point of the middle and upper classes of society."
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2003-11-10.

www.history
Washington As It Was: Photographs by Theodor Horydczak, 1923–1959
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Zachary M. Schrag.
Reviewed 2005-09-01.
Presents approximately 14,350 photographs by Theodor Horydczak (1890–1971), most of which document the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area between the 1920s and 1950s. Subjects include the architecture and interiors of government, commercial, and residential buildings; views of streets and neighborhoods; images of work and leisure; and events such as the 1932 Bonus March and the 1933 World Series. Also includes a limited number of shots taken in other U.S. locations and in Canada and a background essay, “Discovering Theodor Horydczak’s Washington.” Provides visual documentation of official and everyday life in the nation’s capital and its environs.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
New York Public Library Digital Gallery
New York Public Library.
This massive collection presents more than 550,000 images relevant to both U.S. and world history, from the earliest days of print culture to the present. These images consist primarily of historical maps, posters, prints and photographs, illuminated manuscript pages, and images drawn from published books. For browsing, the materials are divided by subject heading, library of origin, the name of the item’s creator and/or publisher, and by collection: Arts & Literature; Cities & Building; Culture & Society; History & Geography; Industry & Technology; Nature & Science; and Printing & Graphics. Within these broad collection headings, the images are further subdivided into more specific groupings, for example, Indonesian dance, dress and fashion, Civil War medical care, and New York City apartment buildings. Keyword and Advanced Search options are useful for those wishing to locate specific items. All images can be downloaded for personal use and are accompanied by detailed biographic information, though users will have to turn elsewhere for further historical context.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
William P. Gottlieb: Photographs from the Golden Age of Jazz
American Memory, Library of Congress.
The New York and Washington, D.C., jazz scene from 1938 to 1948, documented in more than 1,600 photographs by writer-photographer William P. Gottlieb (1917–2006). During the course of his career, Gottlieb took portraits of prominent jazz musicians—including Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, Dizzy Gillespie, Earl Hines, Thelonious Monk, Ella Fitzgerald, and Benny Carter—and legendary venues, such as 52nd Street, the Apollo Theatre, Cafe Society, the Starlight Roof, and Zanzibar. The site also features approximately 170 related articles by Gottlieb from Down Beat magazine; 16 photographs accompanied by Gottlieb’s audio commentary on various assignments; a 4,300-word biography based on oral histories; and a 31-title bibliography. Extremely valuable for jazz fans, music historians, musicians, and those interested in urban popular culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
African American Sheet Music, 1850–1920
American Memory, Library of Congress and Brown University.
See JAH web review by Karen Sotiropoulos.
Reviewed 2001-12-01.
This collection presents 1,305 pieces of sheet music composed by and about African Americans, ranging chronologically from antebellum minstrel shows to early 20th-century African-American musical comedies. Includes works by renowned black composers and lyricists, such as James A. Bland, Will Marion Cook, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Bert Williams, George Walker, Alex Rogers, Jesse A. Shipp, Bob Cole, James Weldon Johnson, J. Rosamond Johnson, James Reese Europe, and Eubie Blake. A “Special Presentation: The Development of an African-American Musical Theatre, 1865–1910” provides a chronological overview that allows users to explore “the emergence of African-American performers and musical troupes, first in blackface minstrelsy, and later at the beginnings of the African-American musical stage in the late 1890s.” In addition, sheet music can be studied to examine racial depictions, both visually, on sheet music covers, and in lyrics; styles of music, such as ragtime, jazz, and spirituals; and a variety of topics of interest to popular audiences, including gender relations, urbanization, and wars. Includes a useful 80-title bibliography and 15-title discography. Much of the material is disturbing due to its heavy dependence on racial caricatures; however, students can gain insight into racial attitudes through an informed use of this site.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota.
See JAH web review by Joel Perlmann.
Reviewed 2003-06-01.
Currently provides 22 census data samples and 65 million records from 13 federal censuses covering the period 1850–1990. These data “collectively comprise our richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population.” The project has applied uniform codes to previously published and newly created data samples. Rather than offering data in aggregated tabular form, the site offers data on individuals and households, allowing researchers to tailor tabulations to their specific interests. Includes data on fertility, marriage, immigration, internal migration, work, occupational structure, education, ethnicity, and household composition. Offers extensive documentation on procedures used to transform data and includes 13 links to other census-related sites. A complementary project to provide multiple data samples from every country from the 1960s to 2000 is underway. Currently this international series offers information and interpretive essays on Kenya, Vietnam, Mexico, Hungary, and Brazil. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social history, the site will probably be forbidding to novices.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps of South Carolina
University of South Carolina Libraries Digital Collections.
See JAH web review by John M. Sherrer and Helena Ferguson.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
The 580 maps of more than 80 South Carolina towns and cities in this archive reveal urban landscapes and the locations of businesses, mills, colleges, depots, and other buildings between 1884 and 1923. The collection includes 232 unpublished, hand-drafted maps from the years 1899 to 1937. All maps are displayed with original color coding. Users can zoom in and out of maps and can pan right, left, up, or down to examine details. Every map is accompanied by bibliographic data. The full collection can be browsed or the user can choose to browse just the unpublished maps. The collection can be searched by city, year of publication, and county. The maps provide many details about mills and are particularly useful in revealing spatial relationships and location of railroad lines. There is also a link to the Union List of Sanborn and other fire insurance maps. An extremely useful resource for those researching the business or urban history of South Carolina in the decades around 1900.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Lost Museum
ASHP/CML and New Media Lab, CUNY and CHNM, George Mason University.
See JAH web review by Timothy J. Gilfoyle.
Reviewed 2011-09-01.
This site recreates in cyberspace P. T. Barnum’s American Museum, which burned down under mysterious circumstances in 1865 after enjoying nearly a quarter century of patronage. The original Museum, known for its attempt to both entertain and educate, contained exhibits touching on natural history, history, and reform efforts along with attractions of a more sensational nature. With the exception of African Americans, who were barred from the Museum until the Civil War, New Yorkers of diverse ethnic, gender, and class identities mingled in the Museum’s shared cultural space. Visitors to the recreation may currently browse or search 16 archives that provide images, facsimiles of documents, contemporary accounts, and explanatory essays on original Barnum exhibits, including the Fejee Mermaid, “Swedish Nightingale” Jenny Lind, the National Baby Show, “Star of the East” Zalumma Agra, Phrenology, the 1864 Conspiracy to disrupt New York City elections, and Joice Heth, a former slave whom Barnum advertised as having been George Washington’s nursemaid. The site allows visitors to immerse themselves in the popular culture of Barnum’s era. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-27.

www.history
City Sites: Multimedia Essays on New York and Chicago, 1870s-1930s
University of Birmingham and University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
An “electronic book,” composed of 10 multimedia essays by European and American scholars on modern urban culture in New York and Chicago. Hyperlinks allow readers to navigate thematically between essays. Ranging in length from 6,000 to 12,000 words, these essays explicitly use recent literary theory to explore urban landscapes, representations, and history. Visitors may follow particular “pathways” across essays for topics relating to architecture, leisure, race, and space. The New York essays deal with the following subjects: Harlem as refuge and ghetto in modernist art and writing; Times Square as represented in New Year’s celebrations; modern ways of seeing revealed in images of the Flatiron Building; an examination of the work of architectural illustrator Hugh Ferris in order to uncover “ways in which the modern imagination expressed itself through architectural discourse”; and tensions between turn-of-the-century representations of the Lower East Side by reformers and others. Chicago essays cover the portrayal of African-American urban styles in the art of Archibald Motley, Jr.; ways the city has been represented as a “gateway”; how urban identities are constructed and experiences portrayed in the novel Sister Carrie; ways that racial difference has been iterated in various discursive fields to shape national identity; and Maxwell Street as a site where urban renewal has displaced distinctive ethnic neighborhood cultures. Essays include dozens of photographs and multimedia displays. Includes a bibliography of more than 400 titles. As a demonstration of “ways in which new multimedia technologies can enhance conventional scholarly understandings of urban culture,” this site may represent the shape of things to come in some scholarly fields. Part of The 3Cities Project (see separate “History Matters” entry for description of larger site).
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2001-09-14.

www.history
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Home for a membership organization of more than 500 colleges and universities worldwide, this site provides “access to a vast archive of social science data for research and instruction.” Data offered is in a variety of sociological and political areas, including census enumerations; urban and community studies; conflict, violence, and wars; economic behavior; legal systems; legislative bodies; mass political behavior and attitudes; and organizational behavior. While much of the site emphasizes the late twentieth century, data sets such as “Historical and Contemporary Electoral Processes” and “1790–1960 Censuses” will be useful to studies of earlier periods. Includes five special topic archives with data in linked sites geared to health, education, aging, criminal justice, and substance abuse and mental health concerns. Also provides 45 links to related sites. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social and political history. The site plans in the future to introduce “a set of pages that focuses on the needs and interests of novice data users.”
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-22.

www.history
Kentuckiana Digital Library
Kentucky Virtual Library.
Provides a wealth of historical material from 15 Kentucky colleges, universities, libraries, and historical societies. Includes nearly 8,000 photographs; 95 full-text books, manuscripts, and journals, from 1784 to 1971; 94 oral history interviews; 78 issues of the magazine Mountain Life & Work, from 1925–62; and 22 issues of the publication Works Progress Administration in Kentucky: Narrative Reports, covering 1935–37. Includes photographic collections of renowned photographer Russell Lee, who documented health conditions resulting from coal industry practices; Roy Stryker, head of the Farm Security Administration photographic project; and others that provide images of a variety of cities, towns, schools, camps, and disappearing cultures. Presents oral histories pertaining to Supreme Court Justice Stanley F. Reed, U.S. Senator John Sherman Cooper, the Frontier Nursing Service, American military veterans, Appalachian fiddlers, and the transition of an area from farming to an industrial economy. Texts include Civil War diaries, religious tracts, speeches, correspondence, and scrapbooks. Includes documents on colonization societies, civil rights, education, railroads, feuding, the Kentucky Derby, exploits of Daniel Boone, pioneer surgery, and a recollection of Abraham Lincoln. Valuable for those studying changes in the social and cultural history of the state.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
WTO History Project
University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Patrick F. Gillham.
Reviewed 2013-09-01.
Designed to provide access now and in the future to documents created by groups that protested the World Trade Organization’s “Ministerial Week,” held in Seattle from November 29-December 3, 1999. Offers texts of more than 80 oral histories of organizers and participants, 73 photographs, and images of 224 fliers, posters, and leaflets. Also includes 46 planning documents, 18 signs carried by protesters, two audio files, three videos, and a timeline documenting 520 events from March to December 1999. A second timeline covers the week of protests and a table with contact information for more than 1,400 organizations that opposed the meetings. Documents in the collection can be searched by keyword, organizations, and issues—labor, environment, trade, democracy, direct action, food, agriculture, health, and independent media. The site’s creators state they are “dedicated to ensuring that any account ever written of the WTO protests be attentive to the range of people who turned out, the varieties of strategies and issues they brought to the streets and the meeting rooms, and the coalitions that emerged and failed.” As a result, the site will be of great value to those studying social protest movements in the late 20th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2003-11-29.

www.history
Digital Library of Georgia
University of Georgia Libraries.
Provides an enormous amount of material digitized from collections housed in libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions in the state of Georgia. Legal materials include more than 17,000 public state government documents from 1994 to the present, updated daily, and a complete set of Acts and Resolutions from 1799 to 1995. A set of “Southeastern Native American Documents” provides approximately 2,000 letters, legal documents, military orders, financial papers, and archeological images covering the period 1730–1842. Materials from the Civil War-era include a soldier’s diary and two collections of letters, one from the wife of an Atlanta lawyer and plantation owner. The site provides a collection of 80 full-text, word-searchable versions of books from the early nineteenth century to the 1920s and three historic newspapers. The site also includes approximately 2,500 political cartoons by Clifford H. “Baldy” Baldowski, from 1946–1982; copies from a first-hand account of a violent incident of civil unrest during a political rally in 1868; Jimmy Carter’s diaries of 1971–75 and 1977–81; annual reports of the mayor of Savannah, 1865–1917; photographs of African Americans from around Augusta in the late 19th century; and 1,500 architectural and landscape photographs from the 1940s to the 1980s. A valuable collection for students of southern life, politics, law, and culture.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
WPA Life Histories, Virginia Interviews
Library of Virginia.
Provides approximately 1,350 life histories and youth studies created by the Virginia Writers‘ Project (VWP)—part of the Works Progress Administration’s Federal Writers’ Project—between October 1938 and May 1941. In addition, the site offers more than 50 interviews with ex-slaves conducted by the VWP’s all-black Virginia Negro Studies unit in 1936 and 1937 and six VWP folklore studies produced between 1937 and 1942. The life histories—ranging between two and 16 pages in length—offer information on rural and urban occupational groups and experiences of individuals during the Depression, in addition to remembrances of late 19th-century and early 20th-century life. The youth studies investigate experiences of young people between the ages of 16 and 24 who left school and include a survey of urban black youth. The ex-slave narratives, selected from more than 300 that were conducted for the project—of which only one-half have survived—provided research for the 1940 WPA publication The Negro in Virginia. Interviews and studies were edited—sometimes extensively—at the Richmond home office. Each study includes a bibliographic record with notes searchable by keyword; for many records, notes are structured to include searchable data on age, gender, race, nationality, industrial classification, and occupation. The site includes a 2,300-word overview of the project. Valuable for those studying social, economic, and cultural life in Virginia during the Depression, in addition to early periods, youth culture, and the history of slavery.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Centennial Celebration
Bureau of the Census.
To celebrate the centennial of the Census Bureau, this site provides access to a wealth of statistical information on the U.S. population. While most materials offer recent data, more than 30 comprehensive reports and tables are included that track decade-by-decade demographic-related shifts, including urban and rural population change, population of the largest 100 cities, population density, and homeownership rates. Additional material details shifts in U.S. international trade in goods and services from 1960–2000; poverty from 1959–2000; race and Hispanic origin of foreign-born populations from 1850–1990; interracial married couples from 1960–1998; and marital status of women at first birth from 1930–1994. Visitors can find current detailed information on social and economic characteristics of African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indian and Alaska Natives, and of baby boomers. The North American Industry Classification System offers recent economic data on eight business sectors. American FactFinder offers detailed maps with demographic information for individual blocks and for larger areas. Yearly editions of Statistical Abstract of the United States from 1995 to 2001 are included, along with charts of demographic information according to categories such as age, ancestry, and income. In addition, the site provides a collection of “fast facts” for each decade of the 20th century, four historical timelines, and approximately 20 photographs related to the census. Valuable for students and professional historians needing demographic and other statistical information on population trends.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-04.

www.history
After the Day of Infamy: “Man on the Street” Interviews Following the Attack on Pearl Harbor
American Memory, Library of Congress.
The Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The following day, Alan Lomax, head of the Archive of American Folk Song, asked fieldworkers in the Library of Congress Radio Research Project to make documentary recordings in cities and towns around the United States. These fieldworkers collected “man-on-the-street” reactions to the bombing and the declaration of war by the United States. In January and February, 1942, fieldworkers collected a second set of recordings, asking people to address their views of the attack and declaration of war directly to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. This presentation consists of both sets of recordings, totaling approximately 12 hours, offering the thoughts and opinions of more than 200 Americans “after the day of infamy.” Related written documents created by fieldworkers, correspondence with archive staff, biographies of the fieldworkers, and dust jackets from the original disks are also included. The interviews are available in audio and text and are searchable by keyword, as well as by subject, state, or name of interviewee.
Resources Available: TEXT, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-27.

www.history
American Shores: Maps of the Middle Atlantic Region to 1850
New York Public Library.
This attractive site explores the mid-Atlantic region and history with maps created before 1850. An extensive collection offers more than 1,852 historical maps of many different types. In addition to numerous regional and state maps, these include land surveys, coast surveys, nautical charts, military maps, ornamental maps, and city maps. An overview provides historical context for reading the maps of the geographic regions. In addition, the site offers several special features. “Basics of Maps” explains such cartographic terms and features as orientation, scale, and the cartouche. “Maps Through History” highlights particular maps and map genres from the collection, including a look at New York Harbor, the Hudson River, nautical charts, maps revealing early transportation routes, and maps of American Revolution battle sites. “Geographical Areas” highlights many kinds of maps and what information they offer. Visitors can click on thumbnail images to view enlarged maps and pan and zoom the maps. The collection is searchable by keyword and combinations of keywords. An outstanding resource for those studying the political and social history of the U.S. to 1850.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.