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There are 113 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Ad*Access
Digital Scriptorium, Duke University.
See JAH web review by Kelly Schrum.
Reviewed 2001-09-01.
This well-developed, easily navigated site presents images and database information for more than 7,000 advertisements printed primarily in the United States from 1911 to 1955. Material is drawn from the J. Walter Thompson Company Competitive Advertisements Collection of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History at Duke University. The advertisements are divided into 5 main subjects areas: Radio (including radios, radio parts, and radio programs); Television (including television sets and programs); Transportation (including airlines, rental cars, buses, trains, and ships); Beauty and Hygiene (including cosmetics, soaps, and shaving supplies); and World War II (U.S. Government ads, such as V-mail or bond drives). The ads are searchable by keyword, type of illustration, and special features. A timeline from 1915 to 1955 provides general context for the ads with a chronology of major events. “About Ad Access” provides an overview of advertising history and the Duke collection, as well as a bibliography and list of advertising repositories in the U.S. Excellent archive of primary documents for students of consumer and popular culture. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-10.

www.history
Wright American Fiction, 1851–1875
Committee on Institutional Cooperation; Indiana University Digital Library Program.
See JAH web review by Robert K. Nelson.
Reviewed 2003-06-01.
An ambitious attempt to digitize 19th century American fiction as listed in Lyle Wright’s bibliography, American Fiction, 1815–1875, this collection of texts is a work-in-progress. At present, the site offers 2,887 texts by 1,456 authors. Of these, 1,124 have been edited and SGML encoded so that users may access chapter and story divisions through table of contents hyperlinks. The remaining 1,763 texts have not been proofed, but still can be perused either as facsimiles of original pages or in unedited transcriptions. Most valuable is the ability to perform word searches on the whole database. A most valuable site for those studying American literature and popular culture of the 19th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-06.

www.history
America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA-OWI, 1935–1945
American Memory, Library of Congress.
More than 160,000 images taken by government photographers with the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and the Office of War Information (OWI) during the New Deal and World War II eras are featured on this site. These images document the ravages of the Great Depression on farmers, scenes of everyday life in small towns and cities, and, in later years, mobilization campaigns for World War II. This site includes approximately 1,600 color photographs and selections from 2 extremely popular collections: “’Migrant Mother’ Photographs” and “Photographs of Signs Enforcing Racial Discrimination.” The site also provides a bibliography, a background essay of about 500 words, seven short biographical sketches of FSA-OWI photographers, links to 7 related sites, and 3 essays on cataloging and digitizing the collection. The photographs are searchable by keyword and arranged into a subject index.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
Mark Twain in His Times
Stephen Railton, University of Virginia.
See JAH web review by Carl Smith.
Reviewed 2001-06-01.
This impressive, engaging site is based on the University of Virginia Barrett Collection of Mark Twain’s works and life. Three of the eight sections focus on Twain’s life and career, including the creation of his popular image, the marketing and promotion of his texts, and live performances. The other five sections center on major works, including Innocents Abroad, Tom Sawyer, and Pudd’nhead Wilson. Each section is placed within a historical context, providing background as well as thought-provoking questions and interactive exhibits. The site includes an extensive collection of text sources, including 50 published texts or lectures, 16 letters, over 100 texts and excerpts from other late-19th-century authors, 29 items from publishers, including promotional material, 80 newspaper and magazine articles, 35 obituary notices, and over 100 contemporary reviews. In addition, there are hundreds of illustrations and photographs of and by Twain, as well as interactive graphic displays such as an essay on the role of images that explores the issue of Huck Finn and racism through the various American illustrations of Jim and a display of Mark Twain’s various signatures that encourages students to explore Clemens, Twain, and identity. This is an invaluable resource for high school and college teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-03.

www.history
New York Public Library Digital Gallery
New York Public Library.
This massive collection presents more than 550,000 images relevant to both U.S. and world history, from the earliest days of print culture to the present. These images consist primarily of historical maps, posters, prints and photographs, illuminated manuscript pages, and images drawn from published books. For browsing, the materials are divided by subject heading, library of origin, the name of the item’s creator and/or publisher, and by collection: Arts & Literature; Cities & Building; Culture & Society; History & Geography; Industry & Technology; Nature & Science; and Printing & Graphics. Within these broad collection headings, the images are further subdivided into more specific groupings, for example, Indonesian dance, dress and fashion, Civil War medical care, and New York City apartment buildings. Keyword and Advanced Search options are useful for those wishing to locate specific items. All images can be downloaded for personal use and are accompanied by detailed biographic information, though users will have to turn elsewhere for further historical context.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Lost Museum
ASHP/CML and New Media Lab, CUNY and CHNM, George Mason University.
See JAH web review by Timothy J. Gilfoyle.
Reviewed 2011-09-01.
This site recreates in cyberspace P. T. Barnum’s American Museum, which burned down under mysterious circumstances in 1865 after enjoying nearly a quarter century of patronage. The original Museum, known for its attempt to both entertain and educate, contained exhibits touching on natural history, history, and reform efforts along with attractions of a more sensational nature. With the exception of African Americans, who were barred from the Museum until the Civil War, New Yorkers of diverse ethnic, gender, and class identities mingled in the Museum’s shared cultural space. Visitors to the recreation may currently browse or search 16 archives that provide images, facsimiles of documents, contemporary accounts, and explanatory essays on original Barnum exhibits, including the Fejee Mermaid, “Swedish Nightingale” Jenny Lind, the National Baby Show, “Star of the East” Zalumma Agra, Phrenology, the 1864 Conspiracy to disrupt New York City elections, and Joice Heth, a former slave whom Barnum advertised as having been George Washington’s nursemaid. The site allows visitors to immerse themselves in the popular culture of Barnum’s era. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-27.

www.history
Phillip Morris Advertising Archive
Philip Morris Incorporated.
See JAH web review by Pamela Walker Laird.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
More than 55,000 color images of tobacco advertisements from litigated cases, dating back to 1909, are now available on this site, created as a stipulation of the Master Settlement Agreement between the tobacco industry and various states’ attorneys general. In addition, more than 26 million pages of documents concerning “research, manufacturing, marketing, advertising and sales of cigarettes, among other topics” are provided in linked sites to the four tobacco companies involved—Philip Morris, R. J. Reynolds, Lorillard, and Brown and Williamson—and to two industry organizations, the Tobacco Institute and the Council for Tobacco Research. Ads and documents can be accessed by date, brand name, title words, and persons mentioned, among other searchable fields. Images can be magnified and rotated. An important site for those studying the historical uses of advertising to promote smoking and those with a more general interest in some of the motifs in ad texts and images that have become part of 20th-century American life.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
City Sites: Multimedia Essays on New York and Chicago, 1870s-1930s
University of Birmingham and University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
An “electronic book,” composed of 10 multimedia essays by European and American scholars on modern urban culture in New York and Chicago. Hyperlinks allow readers to navigate thematically between essays. Ranging in length from 6,000 to 12,000 words, these essays explicitly use recent literary theory to explore urban landscapes, representations, and history. Visitors may follow particular “pathways” across essays for topics relating to architecture, leisure, race, and space. The New York essays deal with the following subjects: Harlem as refuge and ghetto in modernist art and writing; Times Square as represented in New Year’s celebrations; modern ways of seeing revealed in images of the Flatiron Building; an examination of the work of architectural illustrator Hugh Ferris in order to uncover “ways in which the modern imagination expressed itself through architectural discourse”; and tensions between turn-of-the-century representations of the Lower East Side by reformers and others. Chicago essays cover the portrayal of African-American urban styles in the art of Archibald Motley, Jr.; ways the city has been represented as a “gateway”; how urban identities are constructed and experiences portrayed in the novel Sister Carrie; ways that racial difference has been iterated in various discursive fields to shape national identity; and Maxwell Street as a site where urban renewal has displaced distinctive ethnic neighborhood cultures. Essays include dozens of photographs and multimedia displays. Includes a bibliography of more than 400 titles. As a demonstration of “ways in which new multimedia technologies can enhance conventional scholarly understandings of urban culture,” this site may represent the shape of things to come in some scholarly fields. Part of The 3Cities Project (see separate “History Matters” entry for description of larger site).
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2001-09-14.

www.history
WTO History Project
University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Patrick F. Gillham.
Reviewed 2013-09-01.
Designed to provide access now and in the future to documents created by groups that protested the World Trade Organization’s “Ministerial Week,” held in Seattle from November 29-December 3, 1999. Offers texts of more than 80 oral histories of organizers and participants, 73 photographs, and images of 224 fliers, posters, and leaflets. Also includes 46 planning documents, 18 signs carried by protesters, two audio files, three videos, and a timeline documenting 520 events from March to December 1999. A second timeline covers the week of protests and a table with contact information for more than 1,400 organizations that opposed the meetings. Documents in the collection can be searched by keyword, organizations, and issues—labor, environment, trade, democracy, direct action, food, agriculture, health, and independent media. The site’s creators state they are “dedicated to ensuring that any account ever written of the WTO protests be attentive to the range of people who turned out, the varieties of strategies and issues they brought to the streets and the meeting rooms, and the coalitions that emerged and failed.” As a result, the site will be of great value to those studying social protest movements in the late 20th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2003-11-29.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Core Historical Literature of Agriculture
Albert R. Mann Library, Cornell University.
See JAH web review by Steven Stoll.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
Currently this site presents full-text, word-searchable facsimiles of 1,850 monographs and 288 journal volumes related to agriculture published in the U.S. between 1806 and 1989. Evaluations and 4,500 core titles are detailed in the seven volume series The Literature of the Agricultural Sciences. Additional texts will be added to the site periodically. Fields of study covered include “agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, animal science, crops and their protection, food science, forestry, human nutrition, rural sociology, and soil science.” Types of materials include memoirs and transactions of early agricultural societies, newspapers, almanacs, agricultural periodicals, governmental publications, and archives of families, communities, and corporations. Users can search by author, title, subject, or keyword, then access a text’s title page, table of contents, index, or any particular page desired. Valuable for those studying the profound social, cultural, and economic effects of shifts in the history of American farming during the period covered.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-19.

www.history
Alcohol, Temperance, and Prohibition
Brown University Library.
See JAH web review by Elaine Frantz Parsons.
Reviewed 2007-12-01.
A small, but useful, site with a wide range of primary source material for researching the history of the prohibition movement, temperance, or alcoholism, this archive presents broadsides, sheet music, pamphlets, and government publications related to the temperance movement and prohibition. Materials include items from the period leading up to prohibition as well as the prohibition era itself, ending with the passage of the 21st amendment in 1933. More than 1,800 items can be browsed by title, creator, or publisher. The collection is also searchable by keyword (basic and advanced searches are available). All digitized items are in the public domain. A historical essay, “Temperance and Prohibition Era Propaganda: A Study in Rhetoric” by Leah Rae Berk is available.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
Duke Digital Collections
Digital Scriptorium, Duke University.
Embracing twelve digitized collections, five exhibits, and six student projects, this website contains primary documents. Collections include two websites related to advertising — Emergence of Advertising in America, 1850�1920 [147] and Ad*Access [180] — in addition to a collection of health-related ads from 1911 to 1958 in Medicine and Madison Avenue [160]. George Percival Scriven: An American in Bohol, The Philippines, 1899�1901 presents a first-hand account by a U.S. officer of life during the occupation. Civil War Women offers correspondence and a diary relating to three American women of diverse backgrounds. African American Women presents letters by three slaves and a memoir by the daughter of slaves. The Emma Spaulding Bryant Letters presents ten revealing letters written in 1873 by Mrs. Bryant to her husband concerning medical and private matters. Historic American Sheet Music includes more than 3,000 pieces published between 1850 and 1920. Documents from the Women’s Liberation Movement offers more than forty documents from 1969 to 1974. William Gedney Photographs and Writings provides close to 5,000 prints, work prints, and contact sheets from the 1950s to the 1980s. Urban Landscapes present more than 1,000 images depicting urban areas.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-10.

www.history
Readex Digital Collections
Newsbank.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Hundreds of thousands of documents spanning four centuries of American history are available in this large archive. Broadsides, ephemera, pamphlets, and booklets are available from 1639 to 1900. More than 1,300 newspaper titles, representing all fifty states, range in date from 1690 to 1922. U.S. Senate and House of Representatives reports, journals, and other documents are available from 1817 to 1980. Legislative and executive documents from the Early Republic are also included. The entire body of documents is keyword searchable, and, in addition, each collection can be searched and browsed individually. These documents shed light on many aspects of American social, political, economic, and cultural history, and can provide a valuable window into the daily lives of early Atlantic peoples. The collection of broadsides and ephemera is especially useful for exploring the history of printing in the United States, as all titles can be browsed by bookseller, printer, or publisher.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-31.

www.history
TUPPERWARE!
PBS.
This site explores the invention and rise of Tupperware products in the 1950s, as well as its impact on women’s issues, and its connection to the 20th-century consumer culture revolution. The site focuses on Earl Tupper, the inventor of Tupperware, and Brownie Wise, the woman who created the Tupperware party concept and built a Tupperware empire. Included are short (500-word) biographies of each. In the Gallery, visitors can see 12 of Tupper’s invention notebooks to examine some of his inventions that were not as successful as Tupperware, like his no-drip ice cream cone and his necktie shaper. The Teacher’s Guide offers two learning activities in each of four academic areas: civics, economics, geography, and history. A timeline spans from the 1850s to 2003 and includes events such as the invention of plastic. Primary Sources includes transcripts of interviews with Tupper and Wise, six video clips from the late 1950s and early 1960s (documenting the annual Tupperware Homecoming Jubilees, which were large gatherings of Tupperware dealers), as well as excerpts from the first Tupperware handbook. Also included are six documents, including a 1960s training manual, How to Sell Tupperware, and a collection of Wise’s Aphorisms. Visitors can share their experiences with Tupperware, either as consumers or as Tupperware dealers, in the Share Your Story section. Finally, the site features an interview with a noted historian of women’s issues who discusses the realities of married women’s employment in the 1950s, as well as the impact Tupperware had on women’s opportunities. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2004-06-03.

www.history
Dime Novels and Penny Dreadfuls
Stanford University.
Presents more than 2,300 images of front and back covers as well as nine full-text selections of American “dime novels,” their British counterparts, the “penny dreadfuls,” and weekly story papers that flourished in the mid- to late-19th century. Contents selected from Stanford University’s Dime Novel and Story Paper Collection. The site offers three “guided tours”—consisting of selected images and essays of approximately 1,500 words each—on print processes; publishers, authors, and fictional heroes; and the entire Stanford Collection. The full-text selections include stories starring such heroes as Nick Carter, Buffalo Bill, Jesse James, Deadwood Dick, Fred Fearnot, and Calamity Jane. The site provides basic information on each title—a few sentences on plot and publishing history—and includes indexing according to various features: subject, genre, setting, intended audience age and gender, and type of graphic material. At present, searching functions are not available, but users may browse images by title and feature. Subject indexing of cover iconography is especially valuable as listings are organized according to depictions of ethnicity/nationality, occupation, types of places, types of sports and recreations, types of violence, and types of gestures and actions classified according to gender of character portrayed. Includes a 27-title bibliography and an annotated timeline. Very valuable for those studying 19th-century American popular culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Medicine and Madison Avenue
Ellen Gartrell, National Humanities Center, and Digital Scriptorium, Duke University .
This exhibit is designed to help users better understand the evolution and complexity of health-related marketing in the 20th century. The project contains two different kinds of historical sources: a selection of more than 600 health-related advertisements printed in newspapers and magazines from 1910 to 1960 and supplementary documents. The advertisements have been organized around 6 categories: Household Products (45 items); Over-the-Counter Drugs (194 items); Personal and Oral Hygiene (184 items); Vitamins and Tonics, Food, Nutrition and Diet Aids (157 items); Institutional and Pharmaceutical (43 items); and Cigarette Ads (1 item). The 35 supplementary text documents include scanned images of internal reports from marketing companies, American Medical Association reports and editorials, Federal Trade Commission archival records, transcripts of 1930s radio commercials, and articles from medical journals. The project is designed for teachers and students in secondary schools, universities, and medical and public health programs. There are suggestions for how to use these primary documents in the classroom, including materials for case studies on Fleischmann’s Yeast, Listerine, and Scott Tissue. Users will also find the 85-item bibliography beneficial. This is an essential site for anyone interested in the history of modern advertising and modern medicine.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-24.

www.history
American History 102: Civil War to the Present
Stanley K. Schultz, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
This site reflects efforts to teach an American history survey course entirely through technology. Offers student lecture notes; 32 biographical sketches of prominent figures treated in the course, searchable by occupation, name, and era; bibliographic information; exams and review sheets; and a gallery of more than 200 photographs, many of which are taken from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The overall presentation is somewhat fragmented, but the site is rich in resources. Perhaps most valuable is a directory of history websites, organized by subject and time period. Professor Stanley Schultz and his associates have designed the site as a supplement for his videotaped lectures on the post-Civil War period.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Taking the Long View: Panoramic Photographs, 1851–1991
American Memory, Library of Congress.
Nearly 4,000 panoramic photographs of cityscapes, landscapes, and group portraits, deposited as copyright submissions by more than 400 companies, are on display in this site. Panoramic photographs were used to advertise real estate and to document groups, events, and gatherings. Images depict all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and more than 20 foreign countries and territories; subjects include sports, transportation, military activities, agricultural life, natural disasters, college campuses, fairs, dams, bridges, canals, and theaters. Although the images cover the period from 1851 to 1991, the collection centers on the early 20th century. The site includes a 20-title bibliography, an illustrated 1,000-word background essay on the history of panoramic photography, and 500-word explorations of four specific photographers: George R. Lawrence (1869–1938); George N. Barnard (1819–1902); Frederick W. Brehm (1871–1950); and Miles F. Weaver (1879–1932). A useful collection for the documentation of geographic places as well as the depiction of groups and leisure activities.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-04.

www.history
Magic, Illusion, and Detection in Turn of the Century America
Professor Michael O’Malley, George Mason University.
A syllabus and collection of documents for a course in American culture at the turn of the 20th century, exploring “two simultaneous tendencies in American life”: fascination with “personal transformation—with self making, with economic mobility, and also the difference between the real and the fake”; and the emergence of detection “and the wide range of new techniques—like fingerprints, mug shots, and criminology generally—designed to pin down identity.” Presents an array of primary material designed to examine these tendencies, organized in four excursions to an urban newsstand, a saloon, a theater, and a police station. Includes the Horatio Alger novel, Ragged Dick; 14 early motion pictures produced between 1897 and 1905; images depicting various “sciences” of detection used by urban police departments; photographs of saloons and crime scenes; an interview and audio file of pianist and composer Eubie Blake on ragtime music; an excerpt from the 1899 book Vitalogy, on achieving “vigorous manhood”; and posters from urban minstrel shows. Also gives a bibliography drawn from course readings.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
Nineteenth-Century California Sheet Music
Mary Kay Duggan, Museum Informatics Project, University of California, Berkeley.
See JAH web review by Kenneth H. Marcus.
Reviewed 2011-06-01.
Provides scanned images from more than 2,700 pieces of sheet music published between 1852 and 1900 in California, culled from 10 California library and archival collections. Includes more than 800 illustrated covers, 45 audio selections, seven video clips of singers, and a handful of programs, posters, playbills, periodicals, catalogs, broadsheets, books on music, and maps. More than 350 items contain advertising. Also offers explanatory essays of 1,000 to 2,000 words in length with general information on music from more than a dozen ethnic cultures, and with reference to topics, including buildings, composers, dance, disasters, gender, mining, performers, politics, product ads, railroads, and sports. Provides 14 links to additional sheet music collections and reference sources. Valuable to those studying popular culture, California history, music history, advertising, and depictions of ethnicity, gender, and race in 19th-century America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-17.

www.history
Lester S. Levy Collection of Sheet Music
Milton S. Eisenhower Library, Johns Hopkins University.
Provides scanned images of more than 18,000 pieces of sheet music, including covers published prior to 1923, and cataloging for an additional 11,000 items not in the public domain. While the collection, compiled by an American musicologist, covers the period 1780–1980, it focuses on 19th-century popular music, especially songs relating to military conflicts, presidents, romance, transportation, and songs from the minstrel stage. Users may search for songs on hundreds of topics such as drinking, smoking, fraternal orders, the circus, and death, or look for composers, song titles, or other catalog record data. Useful for the study of 19th- and early 20th-century popular culture, especially with regard to depictions of ethnicity, gender, and race in images and songs. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-20.

www.history
Material History of American Religion Project
James Hudnut-Beumler, Dean, Vanderbilt University Divinity School .
In 1996, eight historians of religion and three advisors embarked on a five-year project to illuminate ways that material culture and economic history can be used in the study of American religion, a discipline traditionally dominated by ideas. The site presents annotated photographs of 39 objects, including an evangelical coffee bar, chewing gum packed with biblical verses, artwork in a family Bible, and a church stick used to awaken sleeping congregants. Thirty-eight documents from the 1850s to the 1960s, range from an 1854 book steward report for the African Methodist Episcopal Church to a chain e-mail from the 1990s. The site also includes 23 essays and interviews by the project’s participants on such eclectic subjects as “Material Christianity,” religious architecture, how Catholic practice has shaped children’s experiences, the role of costume in the Salvation Army, how to practice economic history of religion, and “what makes a Jewish home Jewish.” Includes eight issues of the project’s newsletter; a bibliography of 22 titles; and links to 18 related sites. This site will be especially valuable to university students interested in evaluating the value of material culture scholarship in religious studies, students of economic history curious about applying their discipline to non-traditional fields of inquiry, and scholars within the field of material culture and the broad discipline of American cultural history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Explore Jazz Era Chicago
Scott Newman.
This narrative and visual history of Chicago during the jazz age created by a Loyola University graduate student, explores the development of consumer culture, leisure, and entertainment in Chicago from the turn of the century to the Great Depression. The site provides a 2,600-word introductory essay and nine main sections, each devoted to a particular theme, including bright-light districts, department stores, movie theaters, hotels, and sports facilities. Almost all of the sections include an approximately 200-word essay that provides historical context, and sub-categories that highlight commercial, retail, transportation, and entertainment centers in Chicago. For example, in department stores, users can read about the origins and growth of Marshall Field and Company. Those interested in dance halls will find an informative 1,200-word essay about the Savoy Ballroom, the club where America’s hottest jazz bands performed in the 1920s. One of the most fascinating sections is “bright-light districts” which explores 12 districts in the city, such as the 47th and South Parkway area, often referred to as the “Harlem of Chicago” and the infamous Loop, known for retail and entertainment. This site includes 40 full-text newspaper articles, approximately 40 photographs and links to additional photographs selected from the Library of Congress, more than 100 links to related online resources (including general Chicago history, famous Chicagoans, major events and popular culture), and a detailed suggested reading lists with more than a dozen books annotated. Researchers exploring 20th-century Chicago history, progressive era culture, consumerism, and urban development, will find this site useful.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-01-10.

www.history
Prosperity and Thrift: Coolidge Era and the Consumer Economy
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This Library of Congress exhibit assembles a wide assortment of materials from the 1920s loosely related to the prosperity of the Coolidge years and the rise of a mass consumer economy. The collection includes over 400 documents, images, and audio and video clips. An introductory essay provides valuable background information on the Coolidge administration with additional insight on the social and cultural context of the era. An alphabetized guide to people, organizations, and topics includes definitions and brief descriptions. This sort of material has not been widely available, and this collection is extremely valuable as a resource for the development of mass consumption. The materials are available almost entirely as page images, not as text.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-15.

www.history
Emergence of Advertising in America: 1850–1920
John W. Hartman Center and Duke University Digital Scriptorium.
See JAH web review by Daniel Pope.
Reviewed 2007-09-01.
A collaborative effort between the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History and Duke University’s Digital Scriptorium, this site contains images of over 9,000 advertising items and publications dating from 1850 to 1920. Selected items illustrate the rise of consumer culture in America from the mid-19th century and the development of a professionalized advertising industry. The images are grouped into eleven categories: advertising ephemera (trade cards, calendars, almanacs, postcards); broadsides for placement on walls, fences, and sides of buildings; advertising cookbooks from food companies and appliance manufacturers; early advertising publications created by agencies to promote the concepts and methods of the advertising industry; J. Walter Thompson Company “House Ads,” promotional literature from the oldest advertising agency in the U.S.; Kodakiana collection of some of the earliest Kodak print advertisements; Lever Brothers Lux (soap) advertisements; outdoor advertising; and tobacco advertisements. Each category contains a brief (250-word) overview of the subject matter, and each image is accompanied by production information such as the date issued, advertising agency involved, and company for which the advertising was done. The site also includes a timeline of the history of the advertising industry from the 1850s to 1920. It is searchable by keyword or contents of the advertising items. This easy-to-use digital collection is ideal for researching late-19th and early-20th century consumer culture and marketing strategies.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2010-05-10.

www.history
Fifty Years of Coca-Cola Television Advertisements
American Memory, Library of Congress.
Highlights of Coca-Cola television advertisements from the Library of Congress Motion Picture archives are exhibited on this site, with 50 commercials, broadcast outtakes, and experimental footage reflecting the historical development of television advertising for a major commercial product. There are 5examples of stop-motion advertisements from the mid-1950s, 18 experiments with color and lighting for television ads from 1964, and well-known commercials, such as the “Hilltop” commercial featuring the song “I’d Like to Buy the World a Coke” (1971); the “Mean Joe Greene” commercial (1979); the first “Polar Bear” commercial (1993); the “Snowflake” commercial (1999); and “First Experience,” an international commercial filmed in Morocco (1999). The site also includes a bibliography and links to finding aids for other television commercials at the Library of Congress. While this site is relatively small, it provides a good resource for studying the history of post-World War II consumer culture in terms of content and technique.
Resources Available: IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-18.

www.history
The 19th Century in Print: Books
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site, part of the Library of Congress American Memory project, features over 1500 full-text images of 19th-century books digitized by the University of Michigan as part of the “Making of America” project. Books in the collection primarily date from 1850 to 1880 and cover such subjects as education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, science and technology, and poetry. The collection is divided into seven general themes: Civil War, Slavery and Abolition, Religion, Education, Self-Help and Self-Improvement, Travel and Westward Expansion, and Poetry. Each section opens with a 200-word descriptive essay, and each book featured on the site is accompanied by notes on the author, full title of the work, date and place of publication, and the publisher. The site is keyword searchable and can be browsed by subject, author, and title. The site is ideal for exploring late-19th-century literature and popular culture.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.