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There are 115 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
New Deal Network
Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute and Institute for Learning Technologies, Teachers College, Columbia University.
See JAH web review by Charles Forcey.
Reviewed 2002-03-01.
A database of more than 20,000 items relating to the New Deal. A “Document Library” contains more than 900 newspaper and journal articles, speeches, letters, reports, advertisements, and other textual materials, treating a broad array of subjects relevant to the period’s social, cultural, political, and economic history, while placing special emphasis on New Deal relief agencies and issues relating to labor, education, agriculture, the Supreme Court, and African Americans. The “Photo Gallery” of more than 5,000 images is organized into five units—“Culture,” “Construction,” “Social Programs,” “Federal Agencies,” and miscellaneous, including photos from 11 exhibitions and five series of photoessays, and images of disaster relief and public figures. The site additionally offers featured exhibits, many with lesson plan suggestions. Presently, the features section includes “The Magpie Sings the Depression,” a collection of 193 poems, articles, and short stories, and 275 graphics from a Bronx high school journal published between 1929 and 1941 with juvenile works by novelist James Baldwin, photographer Richard Avedon, cultural critic Robert Warshow, and film critic Stanley Kauffmann; “Dear Mrs Roosevelt” with selected letters written by young people to the first lady; “Student Activism in the 1930s,” which contains 38 photographs, graphics, and editorial cartoons, 12 American Student Union memoirs, 40 autobiographical essays, and a 20,000-word essay by Robert Cohen on 1930s campus radicalism; 17 selected interviews from American slave narratives gathered by the Works Progress Administration; and an illustrated essay on the history and social effects of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Includes approximately 100 annotated links to related sites. Of great value for teachers, students, and researchers interested in the social history of the New Deal era.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-18.

www.history
America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA-OWI, 1935–1945
American Memory, Library of Congress.
More than 160,000 images taken by government photographers with the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and the Office of War Information (OWI) during the New Deal and World War II eras are featured on this site. These images document the ravages of the Great Depression on farmers, scenes of everyday life in small towns and cities, and, in later years, mobilization campaigns for World War II. This site includes approximately 1,600 color photographs and selections from 2 extremely popular collections: “’Migrant Mother’ Photographs” and “Photographs of Signs Enforcing Racial Discrimination.” The site also provides a bibliography, a background essay of about 500 words, seven short biographical sketches of FSA-OWI photographers, links to 7 related sites, and 3 essays on cataloging and digitizing the collection. The photographs are searchable by keyword and arranged into a subject index.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota.
See JAH web review by Joel Perlmann.
Reviewed 2003-06-01.
Currently provides 22 census data samples and 65 million records from 13 federal censuses covering the period 1850–1990. These data “collectively comprise our richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population.” The project has applied uniform codes to previously published and newly created data samples. Rather than offering data in aggregated tabular form, the site offers data on individuals and households, allowing researchers to tailor tabulations to their specific interests. Includes data on fertility, marriage, immigration, internal migration, work, occupational structure, education, ethnicity, and household composition. Offers extensive documentation on procedures used to transform data and includes 13 links to other census-related sites. A complementary project to provide multiple data samples from every country from the 1960s to 2000 is underway. Currently this international series offers information and interpretive essays on Kenya, Vietnam, Mexico, Hungary, and Brazil. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social history, the site will probably be forbidding to novices.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps of South Carolina
University of South Carolina Libraries Digital Collections.
See JAH web review by John M. Sherrer and Helena Ferguson.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
The 580 maps of more than 80 South Carolina towns and cities in this archive reveal urban landscapes and the locations of businesses, mills, colleges, depots, and other buildings between 1884 and 1923. The collection includes 232 unpublished, hand-drafted maps from the years 1899 to 1937. All maps are displayed with original color coding. Users can zoom in and out of maps and can pan right, left, up, or down to examine details. Every map is accompanied by bibliographic data. The full collection can be browsed or the user can choose to browse just the unpublished maps. The collection can be searched by city, year of publication, and county. The maps provide many details about mills and are particularly useful in revealing spatial relationships and location of railroad lines. There is also a link to the Union List of Sanborn and other fire insurance maps. An extremely useful resource for those researching the business or urban history of South Carolina in the decades around 1900.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Home for a membership organization of more than 500 colleges and universities worldwide, this site provides “access to a vast archive of social science data for research and instruction.” Data offered is in a variety of sociological and political areas, including census enumerations; urban and community studies; conflict, violence, and wars; economic behavior; legal systems; legislative bodies; mass political behavior and attitudes; and organizational behavior. While much of the site emphasizes the late twentieth century, data sets such as “Historical and Contemporary Electoral Processes” and “1790–1960 Censuses” will be useful to studies of earlier periods. Includes five special topic archives with data in linked sites geared to health, education, aging, criminal justice, and substance abuse and mental health concerns. Also provides 45 links to related sites. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social and political history. The site plans in the future to introduce “a set of pages that focuses on the needs and interests of novice data users.”
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-22.

www.history
Kentuckiana Digital Library
Kentucky Virtual Library.
Provides a wealth of historical material from 15 Kentucky colleges, universities, libraries, and historical societies. Includes nearly 8,000 photographs; 95 full-text books, manuscripts, and journals, from 1784 to 1971; 94 oral history interviews; 78 issues of the magazine Mountain Life & Work, from 1925–62; and 22 issues of the publication Works Progress Administration in Kentucky: Narrative Reports, covering 1935–37. Includes photographic collections of renowned photographer Russell Lee, who documented health conditions resulting from coal industry practices; Roy Stryker, head of the Farm Security Administration photographic project; and others that provide images of a variety of cities, towns, schools, camps, and disappearing cultures. Presents oral histories pertaining to Supreme Court Justice Stanley F. Reed, U.S. Senator John Sherman Cooper, the Frontier Nursing Service, American military veterans, Appalachian fiddlers, and the transition of an area from farming to an industrial economy. Texts include Civil War diaries, religious tracts, speeches, correspondence, and scrapbooks. Includes documents on colonization societies, civil rights, education, railroads, feuding, the Kentucky Derby, exploits of Daniel Boone, pioneer surgery, and a recollection of Abraham Lincoln. Valuable for those studying changes in the social and cultural history of the state.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
WTO History Project
University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Patrick F. Gillham.
Reviewed 2013-09-01.
Designed to provide access now and in the future to documents created by groups that protested the World Trade Organization’s “Ministerial Week,” held in Seattle from November 29-December 3, 1999. Offers texts of more than 80 oral histories of organizers and participants, 73 photographs, and images of 224 fliers, posters, and leaflets. Also includes 46 planning documents, 18 signs carried by protesters, two audio files, three videos, and a timeline documenting 520 events from March to December 1999. A second timeline covers the week of protests and a table with contact information for more than 1,400 organizations that opposed the meetings. Documents in the collection can be searched by keyword, organizations, and issues—labor, environment, trade, democracy, direct action, food, agriculture, health, and independent media. The site’s creators state they are “dedicated to ensuring that any account ever written of the WTO protests be attentive to the range of people who turned out, the varieties of strategies and issues they brought to the streets and the meeting rooms, and the coalitions that emerged and failed.” As a result, the site will be of great value to those studying social protest movements in the late 20th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2003-11-29.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Core Historical Literature of Agriculture
Albert R. Mann Library, Cornell University.
See JAH web review by Steven Stoll.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
Currently this site presents full-text, word-searchable facsimiles of 1,850 monographs and 288 journal volumes related to agriculture published in the U.S. between 1806 and 1989. Evaluations and 4,500 core titles are detailed in the seven volume series The Literature of the Agricultural Sciences. Additional texts will be added to the site periodically. Fields of study covered include “agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, animal science, crops and their protection, food science, forestry, human nutrition, rural sociology, and soil science.” Types of materials include memoirs and transactions of early agricultural societies, newspapers, almanacs, agricultural periodicals, governmental publications, and archives of families, communities, and corporations. Users can search by author, title, subject, or keyword, then access a text’s title page, table of contents, index, or any particular page desired. Valuable for those studying the profound social, cultural, and economic effects of shifts in the history of American farming during the period covered.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-19.

www.history
Centennial Celebration
Bureau of the Census.
To celebrate the centennial of the Census Bureau, this site provides access to a wealth of statistical information on the U.S. population. While most materials offer recent data, more than 30 comprehensive reports and tables are included that track decade-by-decade demographic-related shifts, including urban and rural population change, population of the largest 100 cities, population density, and homeownership rates. Additional material details shifts in U.S. international trade in goods and services from 1960–2000; poverty from 1959–2000; race and Hispanic origin of foreign-born populations from 1850–1990; interracial married couples from 1960–1998; and marital status of women at first birth from 1930–1994. Visitors can find current detailed information on social and economic characteristics of African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indian and Alaska Natives, and of baby boomers. The North American Industry Classification System offers recent economic data on eight business sectors. American FactFinder offers detailed maps with demographic information for individual blocks and for larger areas. Yearly editions of Statistical Abstract of the United States from 1995 to 2001 are included, along with charts of demographic information according to categories such as age, ancestry, and income. In addition, the site provides a collection of “fast facts” for each decade of the 20th century, four historical timelines, and approximately 20 photographs related to the census. Valuable for students and professional historians needing demographic and other statistical information on population trends.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-04.

www.history
Flint Sit-Down Strike
Historical Voices.
See JAH web review by Nancy Gabin.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This rich, multi-media resource provides an introduction to “the greatest strike in American history.” For those unfamiliar with the strike, the site includes a 300-word introductory essay with a 7-item bibliography and 7-item webography. It uses audio files that contain the actual voices of former strikers reminiscing about their experiences. The 3 main sections—organization, strike, and aftermath—provide nearly 100 audio memories accompanied by interview transcripts. Each main section also includes a descriptive essay of less than 1,000 words. In addition to the audio memories, there are slideshows, a Flash-generated strike map, and a timeline, each telling the strike story from a different perspective. For example, the site map focuses on the location of strike events, while the timeline offers a temporal vantage point. Users can zoom in and out of the map and click on a plant or icon to read about it and to hear audio clips pertaining to that location. This site offers a comprehensive oral history of the event and is a wonderful resource for high school and college history students and instructors.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-03.

www.history
Slavery and the Making of America
PBS.
This extensive companion to the PBS documentary of the same name provides interpretive and primary material on the history of African-Americans during slavery and Reconstruction, including essays, personal narratives, original documents, historical readings, and lesson plans. The “Time and Place” chronology of slavery and Reconstruction places the main events of U.S. history relating to African Americans between 1619 and 1881 in their historical context. “Slave Memories” allows visitors to hear the voices of African Americans recorded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) on their experiences in slavery and Reconstruction. “Resources” includes 17 print resources, 23 books for children, and 30 websites related to slavery. “Slave Experience” allows users to explore slave life through the themes of legal rights and government; family; men, women, and gender; living conditions; education, arts, and culture; religion; responses to enslavement; and freedom and emancipation. Each features essays, historical overviews, original documents, and personal narratives. A K-12 learning section features historical readings of narratives, slave stories and letters, student plays, links to 19 sites with primary sources, and six lesson plans for middle and high school. This website is a valuable resource for teachers as well as an excellent introduction and overview for those with an interest in the history of slavery and slave life in America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
James Madison Papers
Library of Congress, American Memory.
A valuable resource for researching or teaching about James Madison’s life, the Revolution, or the Early Republic, this website provides access to 12,000 items (72,000 digital images) related to the President.These include his father’s letters, Madison’s correspondence, personal notes, drafts of letters and legislation, and legal and financial documents. Material covers the period from 1723 to 1836. Page images of correspondence can be browsed by title, name, or correspondence series or they can be searched by keyword or phrase appearing in the bibliographic records (descriptive information) of the collection. Additionally, the full text of correspondence for which transcriptions (from published editions of Madison’s papers) are available can also be searched by keyword or phrase. The site provides a timeline covering the period 1751 to 1836 that is useful in placing the events of Madison’s life historical context. Three essays are available, including one on Madison’s life and papers and one on Madison at the Federal Constitutional Convention. This website is a valuable resource for researching or teaching about Madison’s life, the Revolution, or the Early Republic.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
Business Plan Archive
Library of Congress; Center for History and New Media; University of Maryland Libraries.
A collection of business plans and planning information, this archive documents the “Birth of the Dot Com Era.“ Documents can be browsed (free registration required) by alphabetical listing of companies, document type, market sector, or market audience, or the archive can be searched by company name. An advanced search option is also available. Currently, there are 2,445 companies in the archive with one or more documents and more than 3,400 archived documents. Each company record includes a brief description of the company, historical information on the company (if available), and related documents. ”What We Can Learn“ offers three articles on the kinds of observations we can extract from the dot com boom and bust. ”Research Corner" offers tips on using the archive in the classroom, announcements, and other project news. Of particular interest are the entries on guidelines and recommendations for studying companies and for using the archive.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-06.

www.history
Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Georgia Towns and Cities, 1884–1922
Digital Library of Georgia .
See JAH web review by John M. Sherrer and Helena Ferguson.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
This extensive archive offers detailed color maps for more than 130 Georgia towns and cities between 1884 and 1922. The maps reveal urban landscapes and the locations of businesses, mills, colleges, depots, and other buildings. There are 540 sets of maps and most sets have several or more map sheets. For instance, Atlanta for 1911 has 395 map sheets covering the entire city with three index maps and Savannah for 1916 has 137 map sheets with two index maps. All maps are displayed with their original color coding. Users can zoom in and out and pan right, left, up, or down to reveal details and every map is accompanied by full bibliographic data. Visitors can browse the collection by county or city or by year of publication or they can search by keyword, title, city, county, or by address in listed cities. An advanced search feature is also available. Maps for each city are grouped by year with holdings indicated. There are also 17 related links that include two sites on how to read Sanborn maps and seven other digitized collections of Sanborn maps. The maps provide many details about the mills and other industries in these towns, and they are particularly useful in revealing spatial relationships and location of railroad lines. An extremely useful resource for researching the business or urban history of Georgia in the decades around 1900.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Selling the Computer Revolution: Marketing Brochures in the Collection
Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California.
A collection of more than 250 computer marketing brochures from 1948 to 1988, this collection visually represents more than 90 companies. Visitors can explore the entire collection or browse by company. Categories include: calculators, mainframes, minicomputers, personal computers, supercomputers; applications for which the computer was intended; and decade. Of particular interest are 6 early marketing brochures from Apple Computer, a brochure for the Commodore 64 computer, and two mid-1950s IBM brochures for “electronic data processing machines.” Each group of brochures is accompanied by a brief introduction with historical information about the company, category, type of application, or decade. A keyword search is also available. The full contents of each brochure are available for viewing or download in PDF format and each brochure is accompanied by descriptive data. This collection is of interest to those researching or teaching the history of science and technology or the history of marketing.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-07.

www.history
Early American Newspapers: Series 1, 1690–1876
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This archive provides full-text access to more than 350,000 issues of more than 700 newspapers from 23 states and the District of Columbia. The majority of the collection focuses on the 18th and 19th centuries, and sheds light onto a wide range of political, social, cultural, and economic issues in both cities and smaller communities. The New York collection, for example, boasts 157 titles. While 80 of these were published in New York City, the collection also includes newspapers published in Troy, Utica, Catskill, and Ithaca. Massachusetts (137 titles), Pennsylvania (84 titles), Connecticut (47 titles), and Vermont (41 titles) are also well represented, followed by New Hampshire, Maryland, Virginia, South Carolina, and Rhode Island. Keyword searching capabilities combined with extensive browsing options allow both experienced researchers and those largely unfamiliar with early American history to make good use of the resources available here. Browsing options include dates and eras, article types (including news; poetry/songs; advertisements; birth, death, and marriage notices; cartoons and illustrations; maps; letters; and election returns), languages, places of publication, and newspaper titles. Newspapers are displayed as full-page scans, enabled with detailed zoom capabilities, and can be downloaded in .pdf format.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2009-07-30.

www.history
U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817–1980
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This vast archive includes many documents and reports produced by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives and published between 1817 and 1980, for a total of more than 355,000 items. These items include 48,000 maps, 9,000 illustrations, thousands of reports, and numerous records of committee hearings and floor proceedings. All items are full-text searchable and can be browsed by subject, such as education, economics, food and agriculture, health, Indian affairs, armed forces and conflicts, environment and natural resources, and social issues. Within each of these broad categories, there are hundreds of subject headings, such as “animal welfare” (83 items), “alien labor” (306 items), and “ordnance testing” (353 items). The “Indian Affairs” category, for example, presents thousands of items on agencies and organizations relating to Indian affairs, Indian reservations, treaties, names of Indian tribes, as well as documents relating to hundreds of laws and supreme court cases. There is also a bill number search, an alphabetical list of names of all acts of Congress, and a listing of all documents by U.S. Congress session. All documents can be downloaded in .pdf format. In addition, a separate browse feature entitled “Serial Set Maps” facilitates access to thousands of maps from counties and cities across the country. Many of these date to the Civil War-era or later and include images of forts and depictions of field operations. Readex plans to expand coverage through 1994.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-08-19.

www.history
Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project
James N. Gregory, University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Peter Cole.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This collection of hundreds of primary sources documents the long history of struggle for equal rights by various ethnic group sin Seattle, including Filipino, Chinese, Japanese and Native Americans, Jews, Latinos, and African Americans. The website integrates labor rights movements with struggles for political rights, as is evident in “special sections” that highlight the Chicano/a movement, the Black Panther Party, Filipino Cannery Unionism, the United Construction Workers Association, Communism, and the United Farm Workers. Each section brings together oral histories, documents, newspapers, and photographs that are accompanied by written and video commentary to provide historical context. The collection of more than 70 oral histories of activists is especially useful for understanding the lived experience of racism and its especially subtle workings in the Pacific Northwest. Together, these resources provide important national context for the civil rights struggle, too often understood as a solely southern phenomenon.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2006-11-22.

www.history
Historical Thinking Matters
CHNM and Stanford University.
See JAH web review by Eric Sandweiss.
Reviewed 2012-06-01.
Four guided investigations designed to “teach students how to critically read primary sources and how to critique and construct historical narratives” lie at the heart of this website. Topics are in twentieth-century U.S. history: the Spanish American War, the Scopes Trial, Social Security, and Rosa Parks. Each topic includes a short introductory video, a timeline of events, a central question to answer based on an examination of a series of primary sources, and webquest extension activities. For example, the Rosa Parks investigation poses the question: “Why did the boycott of Montgomery’s busses succeed?” After completing a simple login, students read a series of annotated and well-contextualized documents� including letters written by the boycot organizers, a speech by Martin Luther King Jr., and an interview of a woman working in Montgomery�answer guiding questions about these documents in a virtual notebook, and draw on these responses to answer the main question. An extensive section for teachers provides lessons plans, information on U.S. history standards, examples of student work, and additional resources. The website also includes a useful introduction to the idea of historical thinking and approaches for bringing historical thinking skills into the classroom.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-13.

www.history
Readex Digital Collections
Newsbank.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Hundreds of thousands of documents spanning four centuries of American history are available in this large archive. Broadsides, ephemera, pamphlets, and booklets are available from 1639 to 1900. More than 1,300 newspaper titles, representing all fifty states, range in date from 1690 to 1922. U.S. Senate and House of Representatives reports, journals, and other documents are available from 1817 to 1980. Legislative and executive documents from the Early Republic are also included. The entire body of documents is keyword searchable, and, in addition, each collection can be searched and browsed individually. These documents shed light on many aspects of American social, political, economic, and cultural history, and can provide a valuable window into the daily lives of early Atlantic peoples. The collection of broadsides and ephemera is especially useful for exploring the history of printing in the United States, as all titles can be browsed by bookseller, printer, or publisher.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-31.

www.history
American History 102: Civil War to the Present
Stanley K. Schultz, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
This site reflects efforts to teach an American history survey course entirely through technology. Offers student lecture notes; 32 biographical sketches of prominent figures treated in the course, searchable by occupation, name, and era; bibliographic information; exams and review sheets; and a gallery of more than 200 photographs, many of which are taken from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The overall presentation is somewhat fragmented, but the site is rich in resources. Perhaps most valuable is a directory of history websites, organized by subject and time period. Professor Stanley Schultz and his associates have designed the site as a supplement for his videotaped lectures on the post-Civil War period.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
WestWeb: Western Studies and Research Resources
Professor, Catherine Lavender, College of Staten Island (CUNY).
This gateway offers a wide range of links to primary and secondary documents, bibliographies, maps, images, and other resources for the study and teaching of the American West. Its 31 topics include agriculture, economics, the environment, ethnicity, gender and sexuality, military history, political and legal history, religion, settlement, technology, and water. Also highlights six selected “outstanding sites.” Well-designed, comprehensive, and easy to navigate, the site also furnishes syllabi and additional teaching materials and suggestions.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-06-27.

www.history
The Tax History Project
Tax Analysts.
Created by Tax Analysts, “a non-profit, non-partisan organization fostering open debate on federal, state, and international tax policy,” this site furnishes an eclectic range of primary and secondary resources for the history of American taxation in five sections. “Tax History Museum” currently offers a 23,000-word narrative in eight chronological segments summarizing “American revenue policy and politics” from 1660 to 1900, supplemented with 73 images and 25 links to related documents. The site’s authors hope to open the 20th century portion soon. “The Price of Civilization” makes available 14 posters and more than 6,500 pages of federal documents—consisting primarily of reports from the Treasury Department—dealing with “the rise of the modern federal revenue system” during the Great Depression and World War II. “Presidential Tax Returns” includes returns of Presidents George W. Bush, William Clinton, George H. W. Bush, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Richard Nixon, Franklin Roosevelt, and Vice President Dick Cheney. “Taxing Federalism” features nine of the Federalist Papers, and “Image Gallery” offers 15 political cartoons from the turn of the century to 1947, many by Washington Star cartoonist Clifford Berryman. The site also offers a bibliography of 12 titles and four sound clips of federal officials discussing tax policy. Valuable for students of legal, political, and economic history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-22.

www.history
Pluralism and Unity
David Bailey, Michigan State University, and David Halsted, H-Net.
Presents a wide array of materials that explore “the struggle between these two visions” of pluralism and unity in early 20th-century American thought and life. Arranged into six major sections: “The Idea of Pluralism”; “The Idea of Internationalism”; “Culture and Pluralism”; “Labor and Pluralism”; “Race and Pluralism”; and “Gender and Pluralism”. The site links to major sites on such topics as ethics, politics, culture, sociology, anthropology, religion, economics, imperialism, hegemony, world systems theory, League of Nations, Jim Crow laws, eugenics, the Niagara Movement, NAACP, KKK, unions, strikes, modernism, the genteel tradition, localism, and ragtime. Outlines the perspectives of important public figures including William James, Eugene Debs, Randolph Bourne, Daniel DeLeon, John Dewey, Jane Addams, Horace Kallen, Scott Nearing, Max Eastman, William Cowper Brann, Madison Grant, W. E. B. Du Bois, Mary White Ovington, Charles S. Peirce, Margaret Mead, Woodrow Wilson, John Reed, and Irving Berlin. Although many of the site’s direct links to texts by these figures are no longer operable, users can access sites containing important writings through the “Concepts” section of each of the six major parts. Also includes 12 audio components and dozens of photographs. For its inclusion of links to many extremely useful sites from a variety of perspectives, this site will be valuable to those studying early 20th-century American ideas and debates and their resonance throughout later times.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Archival Research Catalog (ARC)
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).
In addition to providing a catalog for researchers who plan to use National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) materials on site, ARC offers approximately 78,000 digital images of governmental textual records, photographs, and maps. Materials date from the Colonial period to the recent past. ARC includes items on presidents, the nation’s wars, slavery, civil rights, and American Indians. Images dating from the 17th and 18th centuries are also digitized and downoladable. The search engine is clearly organized and invites queries on specific historical materials or general themes. To access digitized materials only, check the box marked “Descriptions of Archival Materials linked to digital copies.” The site conitnues to expand, though as it stands, it provides an exceptional amount of government sanctioned material.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-23.

www.history
Material History of American Religion Project
James Hudnut-Beumler, Dean, Vanderbilt University Divinity School .
In 1996, eight historians of religion and three advisors embarked on a five-year project to illuminate ways that material culture and economic history can be used in the study of American religion, a discipline traditionally dominated by ideas. The site presents annotated photographs of 39 objects, including an evangelical coffee bar, chewing gum packed with biblical verses, artwork in a family Bible, and a church stick used to awaken sleeping congregants. Thirty-eight documents from the 1850s to the 1960s, range from an 1854 book steward report for the African Methodist Episcopal Church to a chain e-mail from the 1990s. The site also includes 23 essays and interviews by the project’s participants on such eclectic subjects as “Material Christianity,” religious architecture, how Catholic practice has shaped children’s experiences, the role of costume in the Salvation Army, how to practice economic history of religion, and “what makes a Jewish home Jewish.” Includes eight issues of the project’s newsletter; a bibliography of 22 titles; and links to 18 related sites. This site will be especially valuable to university students interested in evaluating the value of material culture scholarship in religious studies, students of economic history curious about applying their discipline to non-traditional fields of inquiry, and scholars within the field of material culture and the broad discipline of American cultural history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
The Presidents
Kunhardt Productions and Thirteen/WNET in New York.
See JAH web review by Donald A. Ritchie.
Reviewed 2002-09-01.
All 42 of the nation’s completed presidencies are profiled in detail at this website, which is geared towards teaching the history of the American Presidency. In-depth biographies include information on childhood, education, career, elections, family life, domestic policy, and foreign affairs. Many biographies include links to numerous primary sources—speeches, writings, letters, and diplomatic documents—and to lesson plans. As a companion website to the PBS American Experience documentaries, these resources are hooked into a larger “Archives” section available at the top of the screen. Here, users will find thousands of resources, including maps, movies, and QuickTime Virtual Reality, on many topics in American history divided by theme and chronology, such as technology, popular culture, war, and urban and rural environments. The “Teachers” section similarly provides hundreds of lesson plans exploring such topics as media coverage of presidential elections, the vice president’s role in electoral politics, presidents and foreign policy, and the importance of political compromise.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.