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There are 87 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA-OWI, 1935–1945
American Memory, Library of Congress.
More than 160,000 images taken by government photographers with the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and the Office of War Information (OWI) during the New Deal and World War II eras are featured on this site. These images document the ravages of the Great Depression on farmers, scenes of everyday life in small towns and cities, and, in later years, mobilization campaigns for World War II. This site includes approximately 1,600 color photographs and selections from 2 extremely popular collections: “’Migrant Mother’ Photographs” and “Photographs of Signs Enforcing Racial Discrimination.” The site also provides a bibliography, a background essay of about 500 words, seven short biographical sketches of FSA-OWI photographers, links to 7 related sites, and 3 essays on cataloging and digitizing the collection. The photographs are searchable by keyword and arranged into a subject index.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
California as I Saw It: First-Person Narratives of California’s Early Years, 1849–1900
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by William E. Brown, Jr..
Reviewed 2002-09-01.
The 190 works presented on this site—approximately 40,000 written pages and more than 3,000 illustrations—provide eyewitness accounts covering California history from the Gold Rush through the end of the 19th century. Most authors represented are white, educated, male Americans, including reporters detailing Gold Rush incidents and visitors from the 1880s attracted to a highly-publicized romantic vision of California life. The narratives, in the form of diaries, descriptions, guidebooks, and subsequent reminiscences, portray “pioneer experience, encounters between Anglo-Americans and the diverse peoples who had preceded them, the transformation of the land by mining, ranching, agriculture, and urban development; the often-turbulent growth of communities and cities; and California’s emergence as both a state and a place of uniquely American dreams.” A map of California from 1900, texts, 20 illustrations and photographs, a bibliography for further reading, and a comprehensive discussion of the collection’s strengths and weaknesses provide useful context for first-person accounts. A special presentation recounts early California history illustrated with paintings, engravings, and photographs.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
Touring Turn-of-the-Century America: Photographs from the Detroit Publishing Company, 1880–1920
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Marguerite S. Shaffer.
Reviewed 2004-07-01.
The Detroit Publishing Company was a mass producer of photographic images—especially color postcards, prints, and albums—for the American market from the late 1890s to 1924, the year it went into receivership. This collection of more than 25,000 glass negatives and transparencies and about 300 color photolithograph prints also includes images taken prior to the establishment of the company by landscape photographer William Henry Jackson, who joined the company in 1897 and became its president the following year. Jackson’s earlier work documenting western sites influenced the conservation movement and influenced the establishment of various national parks, including Yellowstone. Although many images in this collection were taken in eastern locations, other areas of the U.S., the Americas, and Europe are represented. The collection specializes in views of buildings, streets, colleges, universities, natural landmarks, resorts, and copies of paintings. More than 300 photographs were taken in Cuba during the period of the Spanish-American War. About 900 Mammoth Plate Photographs include views taken by Jackson of Hopi peoples and their crafts, landscapes along several railroad lines in the United States and Mexico in the 1880s and 1890s, and at other sites in California and Wyoming; and by Henry Greenwood Peabody of the Canadian Rockies.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Evolution of the Conservation Movement, 1850–1920
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Char Miller.
Reviewed 2010-03-01.
Part of the Library of Congress’s American Memory online collection, this site documents the formation of the movement to conserve and protect America’s natural heritage through published works, manuscript documents, images, and motion picture footage drawn from the collections of the Library of Congress. The site contains 62 books and pamphlets, 140 Federal statutes and Congressional resolutions, 34 additional legislative documents, excerpts from the Congressional Globe and the Congressional Record, 360 presidential proclamations, 170 prints and photographs, two historic manuscripts, and two motion pictures. Site visitors can view such holdings as 20 Alfred Bierstadt paintings, period travel literature, a photographic record of Yosemite, Congressional acts regarding conservation and the establishment of national parks. The site provides an annotated chronology of selected events in the development of the conservation movement, with links to pertinent documents and images. The chronology is broken into six periods: 1847–1871; 1872–1889; 1890–1900; 1901–1907; 1908–1911; and 1912–1920. The site is easily navigable and is searchable by subject, author, and keyword. Ideal for researching the history of national parks, nature, and conservation movements in the United States.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
Heading West & Touring West
New York Public Library.
See JAH web review by William D. Rowley.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
This site is home to two related exhibits about the exploration and settlement of the American west. “Heading West” is a collection of 15 maps produced between 1540 and 1900 and divided into five categories: imagining, exploring, settling, mining, and traveling. A 700-word essay introduces the exhibit and each image is accompanied by 50–400 words of explanation. The site links to 16 other sites about exploration and maps of the west. “Touring West” is a collection of materials about performers who toured the west in the 19th century. It is divided into five sections: travel, abolitionists, railroads, recitals, and heroics. Visitors will find 3 images in each section and 50–400 words of explanation. The images include prints and photographs of performers, programs, and promotional posters. An introductory essay of 500-words describes the collection. The site offers 15 links to sites about performance. Both exhibits will be useful to those interested in the west, performance, or search of illustrations.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
WTO History Project
University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Patrick F. Gillham.
Reviewed 2013-09-01.
Designed to provide access now and in the future to documents created by groups that protested the World Trade Organization’s “Ministerial Week,” held in Seattle from November 29-December 3, 1999. Offers texts of more than 80 oral histories of organizers and participants, 73 photographs, and images of 224 fliers, posters, and leaflets. Also includes 46 planning documents, 18 signs carried by protesters, two audio files, three videos, and a timeline documenting 520 events from March to December 1999. A second timeline covers the week of protests and a table with contact information for more than 1,400 organizations that opposed the meetings. Documents in the collection can be searched by keyword, organizations, and issues—labor, environment, trade, democracy, direct action, food, agriculture, health, and independent media. The site’s creators state they are “dedicated to ensuring that any account ever written of the WTO protests be attentive to the range of people who turned out, the varieties of strategies and issues they brought to the streets and the meeting rooms, and the coalitions that emerged and failed.” As a result, the site will be of great value to those studying social protest movements in the late 20th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2003-11-29.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Core Historical Literature of Agriculture
Albert R. Mann Library, Cornell University.
See JAH web review by Steven Stoll.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
Currently this site presents full-text, word-searchable facsimiles of 1,850 monographs and 288 journal volumes related to agriculture published in the U.S. between 1806 and 1989. Evaluations and 4,500 core titles are detailed in the seven volume series The Literature of the Agricultural Sciences. Additional texts will be added to the site periodically. Fields of study covered include “agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, animal science, crops and their protection, food science, forestry, human nutrition, rural sociology, and soil science.” Types of materials include memoirs and transactions of early agricultural societies, newspapers, almanacs, agricultural periodicals, governmental publications, and archives of families, communities, and corporations. Users can search by author, title, subject, or keyword, then access a text’s title page, table of contents, index, or any particular page desired. Valuable for those studying the profound social, cultural, and economic effects of shifts in the history of American farming during the period covered.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-19.

www.history
American Shores: Maps of the Middle Atlantic Region to 1850
New York Public Library.
This attractive site explores the mid-Atlantic region and history with maps created before 1850. An extensive collection offers more than 1,852 historical maps of many different types. In addition to numerous regional and state maps, these include land surveys, coast surveys, nautical charts, military maps, ornamental maps, and city maps. An overview provides historical context for reading the maps of the geographic regions. In addition, the site offers several special features. “Basics of Maps” explains such cartographic terms and features as orientation, scale, and the cartouche. “Maps Through History” highlights particular maps and map genres from the collection, including a look at New York Harbor, the Hudson River, nautical charts, maps revealing early transportation routes, and maps of American Revolution battle sites. “Geographical Areas” highlights many kinds of maps and what information they offer. Visitors can click on thumbnail images to view enlarged maps and pan and zoom the maps. The collection is searchable by keyword and combinations of keywords. An outstanding resource for those studying the political and social history of the U.S. to 1850.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
University of Nebraska Press; Center for Great Plains Studies; UNL Libraries.
See JAH web review by Leonard J. Sadosky.
Reviewed 2009-06-01.
This well-designed site presents the “celebrated Nebraska edition of the Lewis and Clark journals,” edited by Gary E. Moulton, providing the complete text of all the journals from the 1803 to 1806 expedition, as well as introductions, prefaces, and sources. The material is searchable by keyword and phrase. There are 29 scholarly essays about the expedition. An image gallery offers more than 124 images of pages from the journals, 95 images of people and places, and 50 images of plants and animals encountered on the expedition. The maps section includes 12 explanatory maps and 9 images of maps from the journals. Additionally, there are 27 audio excerpts of journal readings and 8 video interviews with the editor of the project. An outstanding resource for researching the history of the Lewis and Clark expedition.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-03.

www.history
U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817–1980
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This vast archive includes many documents and reports produced by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives and published between 1817 and 1980, for a total of more than 355,000 items. These items include 48,000 maps, 9,000 illustrations, thousands of reports, and numerous records of committee hearings and floor proceedings. All items are full-text searchable and can be browsed by subject, such as education, economics, food and agriculture, health, Indian affairs, armed forces and conflicts, environment and natural resources, and social issues. Within each of these broad categories, there are hundreds of subject headings, such as “animal welfare” (83 items), “alien labor” (306 items), and “ordnance testing” (353 items). The “Indian Affairs” category, for example, presents thousands of items on agencies and organizations relating to Indian affairs, Indian reservations, treaties, names of Indian tribes, as well as documents relating to hundreds of laws and supreme court cases. There is also a bill number search, an alphabetical list of names of all acts of Congress, and a listing of all documents by U.S. Congress session. All documents can be downloaded in .pdf format. In addition, a separate browse feature entitled “Serial Set Maps” facilitates access to thousands of maps from counties and cities across the country. Many of these date to the Civil War-era or later and include images of forts and depictions of field operations. Readex plans to expand coverage through 1994.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-08-19.

www.history
Map Collections: 1500–2003
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site presents a large number of maps from the 16th century to the present day focusing on Americana and “cartographic treasures.” The materials are organized into seven thematic categories—“Cities and Towns”; “Conservation and Environment”; “Discovery and Exploration”; “Cultural Landscapes”; “Military Battles and Campaigns”; “Transportation and Communication”; and “General Maps.” Sections include a number of “special presentations,” including several essays ranging from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Users may zoom in to view details and download maps. 17 specific map collections contained within this larger site are described in detail in the following History Matters entries: “Discovery and Exploration”; “The American Revolution and Its Era”; “Railroad Maps, 1828–1900”; “American Colonization Society Collection: Maps of Liberia, 1830–1870”; “Panoramic Maps, 1847–1929”; “Civil War Maps”; and “Mapping the National Parks.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Taking the Long View: Panoramic Photographs, 1851–1991
American Memory, Library of Congress.
Nearly 4,000 panoramic photographs of cityscapes, landscapes, and group portraits, deposited as copyright submissions by more than 400 companies, are on display in this site. Panoramic photographs were used to advertise real estate and to document groups, events, and gatherings. Images depict all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and more than 20 foreign countries and territories; subjects include sports, transportation, military activities, agricultural life, natural disasters, college campuses, fairs, dams, bridges, canals, and theaters. Although the images cover the period from 1851 to 1991, the collection centers on the early 20th century. The site includes a 20-title bibliography, an illustrated 1,000-word background essay on the history of panoramic photography, and 500-word explorations of four specific photographers: George R. Lawrence (1869–1938); George N. Barnard (1819–1902); Frederick W. Brehm (1871–1950); and Miles F. Weaver (1879–1932). A useful collection for the documentation of geographic places as well as the depiction of groups and leisure activities.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-04.

www.history
History: The National Park Service
U.S. National Park Service.
Historical aspects of many of the 384 areas under the National Park Service’s stewardship are presented in this expansive site. A “Links to the Past” section contains more than 25 text and picture presentations on such diverse history-related topics as archeology, architecture, cultural groups and landscapes, historic buildings, and military history. Of particular interest to teachers, a section entitled “Teaching with Historic Places” features more than 60 lesson plans designed “to enliven the teaching of history, social studies, geography, civics, and other subjects” by incorporating National Register of Historic Places into educational explorations of historic subjects. Examples include an early rice plantation in South Carolina; the lives of turn-of-the-century immigrant cigar makers near Tampa, Florida; a contrast between the Indianapolis headquarters of African-American businesswoman Madam C. J. Walker and a small store in Kemmerer, Wyoming, that grew into the J. C. Penney Company, the first nationwide department store chain; the Civil War Andersonville prisoner of war camp; President John F. Kennedy’s birthplace; the Liberty Bell; Finnish log cabins in Iowa; and the Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Saugus Iron Works. Especially useful for teachers interested in connecting the study of history with historic sites.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
WestWeb: Western Studies and Research Resources
Professor, Catherine Lavender, College of Staten Island (CUNY).
This gateway offers a wide range of links to primary and secondary documents, bibliographies, maps, images, and other resources for the study and teaching of the American West. Its 31 topics include agriculture, economics, the environment, ethnicity, gender and sexuality, military history, political and legal history, religion, settlement, technology, and water. Also highlights six selected “outstanding sites.” Well-designed, comprehensive, and easy to navigate, the site also furnishes syllabi and additional teaching materials and suggestions.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-06-27.

www.history
California Heritage Collection
Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley.
An impressive archive of more than 30,000 digitally reproduced images “illustrating California’s history and culture,” taken from nearly 200 collections at UC Berkeley’s Bancroft Library. The site, searchable by keyword, features photographs, sketches, and paintings in six categories: early California missions and mining activities, natural landscapes, Native Americans, San Francisco, World War II and Japanese relocation, and portraits of notable and ordinary Californians from diverse backgrounds. More than 100 images selected from the larger collection are included in an accompanying California Cornerstones Collection. Includes 158 finding aids, additional links to the Bancroft Library, and six “web-based lesson plans” for using the collection in K-12 classrooms. While the text accompanying each image is limited to artist/photographer, subject, and date, the sheer number of images available makes this a valuable resource for those studying California’s history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
The Presidents
Kunhardt Productions and Thirteen/WNET in New York.
See JAH web review by Donald A. Ritchie.
Reviewed 2002-09-01.
All 42 of the nation’s completed presidencies are profiled in detail at this website, which is geared towards teaching the history of the American Presidency. In-depth biographies include information on childhood, education, career, elections, family life, domestic policy, and foreign affairs. Many biographies include links to numerous primary sources—speeches, writings, letters, and diplomatic documents—and to lesson plans. As a companion website to the PBS American Experience documentaries, these resources are hooked into a larger “Archives” section available at the top of the screen. Here, users will find thousands of resources, including maps, movies, and QuickTime Virtual Reality, on many topics in American history divided by theme and chronology, such as technology, popular culture, war, and urban and rural environments. The “Teachers” section similarly provides hundreds of lesson plans exploring such topics as media coverage of presidential elections, the vice president’s role in electoral politics, presidents and foreign policy, and the importance of political compromise.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
American Environmental Photographs, 1891–1936
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Christopher W. Wells.
Reviewed 2011-12-01.
Approximately 4,500 photographs documenting natural environments, ecologies, and plant communities in the United States at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century on this site. Produced by American botanists between 1891 and 1936, the photos describe various ecosystems and landforms across the United States. Users can search for specific plants and some animals as well as for landforms, natural events, and weather patterns. The collection is a bit odd in that it mixes genres and types—clicking on the region “Pennsylvania ” produces eight images, ranging from pictures of dogwoods to a photo of tree rings to three pictures of the Pittsburgh flood. A timeline and an essay on “Ecology and the American Environment” provide valuable background information as well as a bibliography. Useful as record of early environmental thinking as well as a document of vanished landscapes.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-16.

www.history
The 19th Century in Print: Periodicals
American Memory, Library of Congress.
Part of the Library of Congress American Memory Project, this site offers full-text transcriptions of 23 popular 19th-century periodicals digitized by the Cornell University Library and the Preservation Reformatting Division of the Library of Congress. Among the periodicals on this site are literary and political magazines, as well as journals like Scientific American, Manufacturer and Builder, Garden and Forest, and the North American Review. Each periodical is accompanied by very brief (10–15 word) notes on the name and location of the publisher and the years and volumes covered. With the temporary exception of Garden and Forest, each periodical’s full text is searchable by keyword and phrase. A special presentation offers a roughly 750-word essay on the historical background of Garden and Forest by Sheila Connor, the Horticultural Research Archivist at the Arnold Arboretum. There are also links to five related American Memory resources. The site’s broad sampling of periodicals provides an easily navigated source for articles and editorials on a number of 19th-century political, cultural, and social issues.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Connecticut History Online
Connecticut Historical Society, University of Connecticut, Mystic Seaport Museum, New Haven Colony Historical Society.
See JAH web review by Walter W. Woodward.
Reviewed 2006-03-01.
This pilot site is a collaborative effort between the Connecticut Historical Society, the Thomas H. Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut, and the Mystic Seaport Museum, funded by a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. It offers approximately 14,000 images depicting Connecticut’s history from the beginning of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th century. The images are divided into five categories: “Livelihood” offers images of the workplace; “Diversity” depicts racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic variety in the state; “Lifestyle” captures everyday life in the state’s families and communities; “Infrastructure” is a broad category that includes images of government, public, private, and commercial buildings, bridges, education, emergency services, and transportation; and “Environment” offers images of the state’s natural and constructed landscapes and townscapes. Each image includes notes on the creator, date, and place created, medium, repository information, and a brief (40-word) description of the subject. Visitors can search the site by keyword, subject, creator, title, and date. The site also includes two sample lesson plans for middle school classes comparing and contrasting two Connecticut families and the roles of men and women through exercises interpreting the site’s images, a list of ideas for future topics, and themes for secondary-level classrooms. By summer 2004, “Phase Two,” with additional material and a new search interface, will be in operation. This site is ideal for teachers and students interested in the history of Connecticut and its communities.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
HistoryLink.org: The Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History
History Ink.
See JAH web review by James N. Gregory.
Reviewed 2005-12-01.
History Link is an encyclopedia of the history of Seattle and King County, Washington. A timeline of 180 “Milestones”connects visitors to 500-word historical essays on topics in Seattle-area history from before 1851 to 2000. “People’s Histories” presents roughly 150 memoirs and oral histories (1000 to 16,000 words) of Seattle residents of diverse class and ethnic backgrounds, including Squamish and Nordic. There are 18 “Magic Lantern” photographic essays ranging from one image and 40 words to 50 images and 300 words. Special collections have been arranged in 17 folios, which cover topics such as Martin Luther King’s 1961 visit to the city and the World Trade Organization (WTO) meeting in 1999. The WTO archive contains 19 articles of 100 to 2000 words on the history of radicalism in Seattle and the WTO protests of 1999 and 2000. This archive also contains 48 photographs of the protests taken by History Link staff. Visitors may take four Cybertours of the city in which they click on sections of a map and connect to one or two images and 300-word descriptions of local history. “Then and Now” contains 49 before-and-after photographs of Seattle landmarks with 300-word essays on the history of each location. The site is easy to navigate and can be searched by subject. In March 2003, HistoryLink added a database for all of Washington state. It is an excellent resource for all levels of scholars interested in the history of the Northwest or oral history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Prairie Settlement: Nebraska Photographs and Family Letters
American Memory, Library of Congress and Nebraska State Historical Society.
See JAH web review by C. Elizabeth Raymond.
Reviewed 2012-09-01.
This remarkable digital collection, a collaborative effort between the Library of Congress American Memory Project and the Nebraska State Historical Society, integrates 2 Nebraska State Historical Society collections that illustrate the story of settlement on the Great Plains from 1862 to 1912. The 3,500 glass plate negatives from the Solomon Butcher photograph collection depict everyday life in central Nebraska, with images of businesses, farms, people, churches, and fairs in Custer, Buffalo, Dawson, and Cherry counties. Each photograph is accompanied by a 10–15 word caption as well as notes on the date, place, and medium of the photograph. The approximately 318 Oblinger family letters describe the trials of establishing a homestead in Nebraska and everyday life on the Great Plains as they follow the Uriah Oblinger family’s sojourns in Indiana, Nebraska, Minnesota, Kansas, and Missouri. They discuss such topics as land, work, neighbors, crops, religious meetings, problems with grasshoppers, financial troubles, and Nebraska’s Easter Blizzard of 1873. An Oblinger family tree offers a collage of 11 family photographs with an image key and captions and brief (30–50 word) biographies of family members. An approximately 1000-word essay describes the letter collection and the lives of the principal correspondents and offers 13 images of family members and documents. Biographical notes of about 30–50 words are also available for 120 of the people who corresponded with the Oblingers or who were mentioned in the letters. This very special collection is ideal for students or teachers interested in learning about the settlement of the Great Plains and everyday lives in the Midwest. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-01.

www.history
Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, 1992–2001
National Archives and Records Administration, Office of the Federal Register.
Digitized versions of twenty volumes of Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, spanning from 1992 to 2004, are presented on this website. Material includes papers and speeches issued by the Office of the Press Secretary during the terms of William J. Clinton (seventeen volumes, 1993–2001), in addition to two volumes pertaining to George H. W. Bush for 1992, and four volumes for George W. Bush (January 20-June 30, 2004). The documents, including addresses, statements, letters, and interviews with the press, are compiled by the Office of the Federal Register and published in chronological order. Also included are appendices with daily schedules and meetings, nominations to the Senate, proclamations, and executive orders, as well as photographic portfolios accompanying each set of papers. Users may access multiple volumes by keyword searches and separate volumes by title of document, type, subject matter, and personal names.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-03.

www.history
Surveyors of the West: William Henry Jackson and Robert Brewster Stanton
New York Public Library Digital Collections.
This site presents the journals and photographs of two men who surveyed the western states in the second half of the 19th century. William Henry Jackson was a photographer, artist, and writer who traveled along the route of the Union Pacific Railway in 1869. The site provides access to his journal of the expedition, 36 stereoscopic photographs he took along the way, and 13 mammoth prints Jackson made of sites in Colorado and Wyoming. Jackson’s diary describes how he took and developed photographs during the expedition. Robert Brewster Stanton was a civil engineer who surveyed canyons in Colorado for the Colorado Canyon and Pacific Railroad Company between 1889 and 1890. Visitors to the site can read a facsimile of his typed field notes in four volumes. The notes and 36 photographs provide geologic information, but also give a sense of the everyday life of the expedition. The site includes a 500-word biographical essay for each man and finding aids for the larger collections of their papers housed at the New York Public Library. This site is easy to navigate and is useful for studying western states, the environment, and photography in the 19th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Multilaterals Project
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University.
Provides texts of more than 260 international multilateral treaties, agreements, and conventions, from the Treaty of Westphalia (1648) to the International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides (November 2002). Originally designed to make environmental agreements available to the public, this site has expanded to offer additional agreements—including draft texts and some that were never approved. Materials are arranged according to the following 10 categories: Atmosphere and Space; Flora and Fauna—Biodiversity; Cultural Protection; Diplomatic Relations; General; Human Rights; Marine and Coastal; Other Environmental; Trade and Commercial Relations; and Rules of Warfare—Arms Control. Listings are also arranged in chronological order and users may search by keyword. Most of the texts date from the post-World War II period to the present. Includes links to approximately 120 additional sources for treaties and conventions. Although no historical context is provided, this site will be valuable for those studying developments in international law, human rights, military history, diplomacy, environmental history, economic history, and cultural property rights.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-10-28.

www.history
Rivers, Edens, Empires: Lewis and Clark and the Revealing of America
Library of Congress.
Presents 180 documents and artifacts in an exhibit that interprets 19th-century westward exploration through three motivating forces present in Thomas Jefferson’s instructions to Lewis and Clark: a search for navigable rivers to span the continent; a quest for Edenic beauty and riches; and the competitive desire to acquire a continental empire. The range of materials is striking. In addition to maps, plans, and charts, the site offers images (sketches, watercolors, etchings, and engravings), texts (letters, diaries, speeches, newspapers, and books), and tools (surveying and medical instruments, cooking utensils, armaments). Additional resources include images of animal and plant life. The exhibit opens with an examination of the “imperial mentality” common to Virginia’s aristocratic class in the late 18th century, then focuses on the Lewis and Clark journey. It ends with the later expeditions of Zebulon Pike, Stephen H. Long, Charles Wilkes, and John Charles Fremont, and the mid-19th century transcontinental railroad plan that supplanted the search for a water route.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-20.