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There are 180 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.
See JAH web review by Jeffrey Shandler.
Reviewed 2012-03-01.
Introduces the activities of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, located in Washington, DC, and its important collections, in addition to presenting interactive exhibitions and providing resources for study of the Holocaust and related subjects. The site is composed of five sections: education, research, history, remembrance, and conscience. The education section includes material to introduce the subject of the Holocaust to middle- and secondary-level students; the full text of a resource book for teachers; information on publications, programs, fellowships, and internships for scholars, faculty, and university students; and 45 bibliographies arranged by country. The research section contains a survivors registry; material about the Museum’s Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies; an international directory of activities relating to Holocaust-era assets; information on the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research; searchable catalogs pertaining to the Museum’s collections and library; and examples of artworks, artifacts, documents, photographs, films, videos, oral histories, and music. The history section includes the Holocaust Learning Center, with images, essays, and documents on 75 subjects such as anti-semitism, refugees, pogroms, extermination camps, and resistance. The remembrance section provides material on a recent commemorative ceremony undertaken by high school students from Germany, Luxembourg, Washington, D.C., and communities in the U.S. in which churches had been burned. The final section, devoted to the “Committee on Conscience” contains information on current genocidal practices in Sudan. An invaluable site for students as an introduction to Holocaust-related subjects, for scholars as a resource for further studies, and for others as a way to acknowledge the presence of the Holocaust in contemporary culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-12.

www.history
George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741–1799
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Susan Holbrook Perdue.
Reviewed 2008-06-01.
This collection of approximately 65,000 documents written by or to George Washington is the largest collection of original Washington documents in the world. It includes “correspondence, letterbooks, commonplace books, diaries, journals, financial account books, military records, reports, and notes accumulated by Washington from 1741 through 1799.” The site is searchable by keyword, and the range of documents make it an extremely rich source. Unfortunately, many of the documents are available only as page images—often with difficult to decipher handwriting—rather than as transcribed text. Transcripts, however, do exist for all of the diary pages and for additional selected documents. The site includes a number of helpful features: a timeline with annotations to relevant documents; a 1,500-word essay on Washington’s letterbooks; an essay entitled “Creating the American Nation,” with annotations on eight selected documents spanning Washington’s lifetime; a 8,500-word essay on his diaries; an 11,500-word essay on the publication history of Washington’s papers; and a 4,500-word essay on Washington’s career as a surveyor and mapmaker. “Because of the wide range of Washington’s interests, activities, and correspondents, which include ordinary citizens as well as celebrated figures, his papers are a rich source for almost every aspect of colonial and early American history.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
Wright American Fiction, 1851–1875
Committee on Institutional Cooperation; Indiana University Digital Library Program.
See JAH web review by Robert K. Nelson.
Reviewed 2003-06-01.
An ambitious attempt to digitize 19th century American fiction as listed in Lyle Wright’s bibliography, American Fiction, 1815–1875, this collection of texts is a work-in-progress. At present, the site offers 2,887 texts by 1,456 authors. Of these, 1,124 have been edited and SGML encoded so that users may access chapter and story divisions through table of contents hyperlinks. The remaining 1,763 texts have not been proofed, but still can be perused either as facsimiles of original pages or in unedited transcriptions. Most valuable is the ability to perform word searches on the whole database. A most valuable site for those studying American literature and popular culture of the 19th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-06.

www.history
Remembering Jim Crow
American RadioWorks.
See JAH web review by Joseph Crespino.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
A companion site to the NPR radio documentary on segregated life in the South (broadcast in February 2002). Presents 30 audio excerpts, ranging from one minute to ten minutes in length, and approximately 130 photographs, arranged in six thematically-organized sections. Covers legal, social, and cultural aspects of segregation, black community life, and black resistance to the Jim Crow way of life. As anthropologist Kate Ellis, one of the site’s creators, notes, the interviews display a “marked contrast between African American and white reflections on Jim Crow.” Many of the photographs come from personal collections of the people interviewed. The site also includes 16 photographs taken by Farm Security Administration photographer Russell Lee in New Iberia, Louisiana. The site provides audio files and transcripts of the original radio documentary, more than 90 additional stories, a sampling of state segregation laws arranged by topic, links to 9 related sites, and a 41-title bibliography. The project creators—Ellis and personnel from American RadioWorks, the Minnesota Public Radio documentary producers—used interviews selected from more than 1,000 oral histories compiled by Duke University’s “Behind the Veil” project, in addition to conducting new interviews. The short 100-word introductions to each section succinctly provide a contextual framework to the documentary material. Valuable for those studying the American South, race relations, and African American history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Studs Terkel: Conversations with America
Chicago Historical Society .
See JAH web review by Clifford M. Kuhn.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
Part of the digital repository, Historical Voices, this site was created in honor of Studs Terkel, the noted oral historian, radio host of “The Studs Terkel Program,” and Pulitzer Prize-winning author. Dedicated to making Terkel’s 50 years of work available, it presents material pulled from approximately 5,000 hours of sound recordings. The seven galleries—The Studs Terkel Program; Division Street: America; Hard Times; The Good War; Race; Talking to Myself; and Greatest Hits—center on the extensive interviews Terkel completed for the radio show and his books and contain more than 400 audio clips of interviews. Most of the interviews are about 15 minutes in length and explore diverse subjects, including Chicago architecture, urban landscape, immigrants, street life, the 1929 stock market crash, organized labor, New Deal programs, race relations, and integration. Interviewees include Chicago architect Frank Lloyd Wright and labor activist Cesar Chavez as well as men and women on a train to Washington D.C. for the 1963 Civil Rights March. Sound recordings are searchable by date, keyword, or author. Complementing this site is an educational section intended to help students and teachers use oral history in the classroom and a 55-minute interview with Terkel. This well-designed site offers a rich history of many influential, as well as lesser-known, personalities living in the second half of the 20th century and is beneficial to anyone interested in the Great Depression, World War II, race relations, and labor issues.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-24.

www.history
African-American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818–1907
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Randall Burkett.
Reviewed 2005-12-01.
This site presents approximately 350 African-American pamphlets and documents, most of them produced between 1875 and 1900. These works provide “a panoramic and eclectic review of African-American history and culture” in a number of forms, including sermons, organization reports, college catalogs, graduation orations, slave narratives, Congressional speeches, poetry, and playscripts. Topics covered include segregation, voting rights, violence against African Americans, and the colonization movement. Authors include Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Benjamin W. Arnett, Alexander Crummel, and Emanuel Love. Information about publication and a short description (75 words) of content accompanies each pamphlet. The site also offers a timeline of African-American history from 1852 to 1925 and reproductions of original documents and illustrations. A special presentation “The Progress of a People,” recreates a meeting of the National Afro-American Council in December 1898. A rich resource for studying 19th- and early 20th-century African-American leaders and representatives of African-American religious, civic, and social organizations.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
American Leaders Speak: Recordings from World War I and the 1920 Election
American Memory, Library of Congress.
Consists of 59 sound recordings of speeches by American leaders produced from 1918 to 1920 on the Nation’s Forum record label. The speeches—by such prominent public figures as Warren G. Harding, James M. Cox, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Samuel Gompers, Henry Cabot Lodge, John J. Pershing, Will H. Hays, A. Mitchell Palmer, and Rabbi Stephen S. Wise—deal for the most part with issues and events related to World War I and the 1920 presidential election. Additional topics include social unrest, Americanism, bolshevism, taxes, and business practices. Speeches range from 1 to 5 minutes in length. A special presentation, “From War to Normalcy,” introduces the Nation’s Forum Collection with representative recordings from World War I and the 1920 election, including Harding’s famous pronouncement that Americans need “not nostrums but normalcy.” This site includes photographs of speakers and of the actual recording disk labels, as well as text versions of the speeches.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-03.

www.history
Mark Twain in His Times
Stephen Railton, University of Virginia.
See JAH web review by Carl Smith.
Reviewed 2001-06-01.
This impressive, engaging site is based on the University of Virginia Barrett Collection of Mark Twain’s works and life. Three of the eight sections focus on Twain’s life and career, including the creation of his popular image, the marketing and promotion of his texts, and live performances. The other five sections center on major works, including Innocents Abroad, Tom Sawyer, and Pudd’nhead Wilson. Each section is placed within a historical context, providing background as well as thought-provoking questions and interactive exhibits. The site includes an extensive collection of text sources, including 50 published texts or lectures, 16 letters, over 100 texts and excerpts from other late-19th-century authors, 29 items from publishers, including promotional material, 80 newspaper and magazine articles, 35 obituary notices, and over 100 contemporary reviews. In addition, there are hundreds of illustrations and photographs of and by Twain, as well as interactive graphic displays such as an essay on the role of images that explores the issue of Huck Finn and racism through the various American illustrations of Jim and a display of Mark Twain’s various signatures that encourages students to explore Clemens, Twain, and identity. This is an invaluable resource for high school and college teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-03.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
CWIHP: Cold War International History Project
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
See JAH web review by Mark Atwood Lawrence.
Reviewed 2013-12-01.
Much scholarship on the Cold War has been written by Westerners with little access to sources in Soviet archives. This extensive collection seeks to remedy the holes in Cold War historiography by actively collecting sources from the former Communist bloc. Thousands of documents in the diplomatic history of the Cold War are currently available, stretching in time from the 1945–46 Soviet occupation of northern Iran through the late 1990s. These sources, all carefully annotated, are divided both into collections and by geographic region. The 50 document collections cover a wide range of topics, including both specific events (1954 Geneva Conference on Indochina, 1956 Hungarian Revolution, 1980–81 Polish Crisis) and broader topics stretching over longer periods of time (Economic Cold War, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, The Cold War in Africa). The collections vary widely in size, between three and several hundred documents, and include primarily official documents and communication—meeting minutes, memoranda, transcribed conversations between leaders, reports, and several personal letters and diary entries.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-10-28.

www.history
Documents from the Continental Congress and Constitutional Convention
Library of Congress, American Memory Project.
This archive offers 274 documents relating to the work of the Continental Congress and the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, including manuscript annotations. The collection includes extracts of the journals of Congress, resolutions, proclamations, committee reports, treaties, documents relating to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, extracts of proceedings of state assemblies and conventions relating to the ratification of the Constitution, several essays on ratification of the Constitution, and early printed versions of the U.S. Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. It includes 253 titles dating from 1774 to 1788 relating to the Constitutional Congress and twenty-one dating from 1786 to 1789 relating to the Constitutional Convention. The collection can be browsed through an alphabetical list of subjects or searched using keywords. An advanced search is also available. Additionally, two timelines that together cover the period 1764 to 1789 and an essay entitled “To Form a More Perfect Union” provide historical context for the documents through an overview of the main events of the era of the Revolution. A useful resource for studying the history of the revolutionary era and the Constitution.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-14.

www.history
City Sites: Multimedia Essays on New York and Chicago, 1870s-1930s
University of Birmingham and University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
An “electronic book,” composed of 10 multimedia essays by European and American scholars on modern urban culture in New York and Chicago. Hyperlinks allow readers to navigate thematically between essays. Ranging in length from 6,000 to 12,000 words, these essays explicitly use recent literary theory to explore urban landscapes, representations, and history. Visitors may follow particular “pathways” across essays for topics relating to architecture, leisure, race, and space. The New York essays deal with the following subjects: Harlem as refuge and ghetto in modernist art and writing; Times Square as represented in New Year’s celebrations; modern ways of seeing revealed in images of the Flatiron Building; an examination of the work of architectural illustrator Hugh Ferris in order to uncover “ways in which the modern imagination expressed itself through architectural discourse”; and tensions between turn-of-the-century representations of the Lower East Side by reformers and others. Chicago essays cover the portrayal of African-American urban styles in the art of Archibald Motley, Jr.; ways the city has been represented as a “gateway”; how urban identities are constructed and experiences portrayed in the novel Sister Carrie; ways that racial difference has been iterated in various discursive fields to shape national identity; and Maxwell Street as a site where urban renewal has displaced distinctive ethnic neighborhood cultures. Essays include dozens of photographs and multimedia displays. Includes a bibliography of more than 400 titles. As a demonstration of “ways in which new multimedia technologies can enhance conventional scholarly understandings of urban culture,” this site may represent the shape of things to come in some scholarly fields. Part of The 3Cities Project (see separate “History Matters” entry for description of larger site).
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2001-09-14.

www.history
Thomas Jefferson Digital Archive
University of Virginia Library.
See JAH web review by Robert M. S. McDonald.
Reviewed 2004-12-01.
Provides more than 1,700 texts—correspondence, books, addresses, and a variety of public papers—written by or to Thomas Jefferson. Most texts are presented in transcribed, word-searchable format; 18 appear as color images of original manuscripts. The site also includes a biography of Jefferson written in 1834, eight years after his death. The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia, published in 1900, organizes more than 9,000 quotes according to theme and other categories. A collection of 2,700 excerpts from Jefferson’s writings present his political philosophy. A wealth of searchable bibliographic listings is provided, including two previously published volumes and thousands of additional bibliographic references. Also contains a recent dissertation on the construction of the Jefferson-designed University of Virginia (UVA), listings from the Oxford English Dictionary that show Jefferson’s influence on English language usage, and four links to UVA exhibitions on Jefferson. Extremely valuable for the study of Jefferson and the period of the early republic.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Digital Library of Georgia
University of Georgia Libraries.
Provides an enormous amount of material digitized from collections housed in libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions in the state of Georgia. Legal materials include more than 17,000 public state government documents from 1994 to the present, updated daily, and a complete set of Acts and Resolutions from 1799 to 1995. A set of “Southeastern Native American Documents” provides approximately 2,000 letters, legal documents, military orders, financial papers, and archeological images covering the period 1730–1842. Materials from the Civil War-era include a soldier’s diary and two collections of letters, one from the wife of an Atlanta lawyer and plantation owner. The site provides a collection of 80 full-text, word-searchable versions of books from the early nineteenth century to the 1920s and three historic newspapers. The site also includes approximately 2,500 political cartoons by Clifford H. “Baldy” Baldowski, from 1946–1982; copies from a first-hand account of a violent incident of civil unrest during a political rally in 1868; Jimmy Carter’s diaries of 1971–75 and 1977–81; annual reports of the mayor of Savannah, 1865–1917; photographs of African Americans from around Augusta in the late 19th century; and 1,500 architectural and landscape photographs from the 1940s to the 1980s. A valuable collection for students of southern life, politics, law, and culture.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
RFK in the Land of Apartheid: A Ripple of Hope
Larry Shore, Hunter College, CUNY.
Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s trip to South Africa in June 1966 to protest that country’s system of apartheid and support efforts to combat it is amply documented on this site with texts, audio files, film clips, and photographs. The site provides texts of the five speeches delivered by Kennedy during the visit—for three of these, full audio files are provided. Also offers texts of 13 additional speeches—from South African students and political leaders, as well as American leaders—with six available in audio format. Background annotations of up to 100 words accompany all texts. A newspapers section on the press coverage of the visit provides nine articles from U.S. newspapers and 15 articles from South African newspapers. A magazines section provides seven articles about the visit, including a Look magazine article about the trip written by the senator; and a cartoon section highlights 12 political cartoons. The site also provides 13 related documents, and more sources can be found in the “Resources” section. These include the “Black Christ” painting that caused uproar in 1962, 11 posters of Nelson Mendela, 11 annotated political cartoons, two national anthems for comparison, and 19 recommended books and links to 19 relevant sites. An overview essay of 3,500 words describes the “enormous impact” of Kennedy’s visit and illuminates “the manner in which he subtly challenged and undermined some of the pillars of apartheid ideology and mythology.” A study materials section is designed for use in high schools and colleges with questions for class discussion and a feedback questionnaire. Additionally, the site’s audio and video streaming now works with Realplayer and Mediaplayer, and the video streaming also now works with with Quicktime. A valuable site for studying the history of race relations in South Africa and the United States.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2011-07-19.

www.history
Plymouth Colony Archive Project
Patricia Scott Deetz, Christopher Fennell, and J. Eric Deetz, University of Virginia.
See JAH web review by John Saillant.
Reviewed 2004-06-01.
Presents a wealth of documents and analytical essays pertaining to the social history of Plymouth Colony from 1620 to 1691. Also offers a tribute to the scholarly work of the late James Deetz, Harrison Professor of Historical Archaeology, University of Virginia. Documents include 135 probates, 24 wills, and 14 texts containing laws and court cases on such subjects as land division, master-servant relations, sexual misconduct, and disputes involving Native Americans. In addition, the site provides more than 90 biographical studies, research papers and topical articles by James Deetz, Patricia Scott Deetz, and their students that analyze “life ways” of 395 individuals who lived in the colony and offer theoretical views on the colony’s legal structure, women’s roles, vernacular house forms, and domestic violence, among other topics. Includes 25 maps or plans of the colony; approximately 50 photographs; excerpts from Deetz’s books on the history and myths of Plymouth Colony and on Anglo-American gravestone styles; seven lesson plans; an extensive glossary of archaeological terms; and tributes to Deetz. Valuable for those interested in historical anthropology, material culture studies, and American colonial history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-09.

www.history
The History of Jim Crow
Richard Wormhiser, Bill Jersey, Sam Pollard, WNET.
See JAH web review by Joseph Crespino.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
This site for educators was produced as an online companion to The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow, a four-part television series that tells the story of the African-American struggle for freedom during the era of segregation. The site consists of five sections, including television, history, geography, American literature, and teacher resources. “Television” provides teachers with guides to four part, from the end of the Civil War to the historic 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. The history section contains six historical essays (each between 5,000 to 7,000 words), including the introductory essay “Terror to Triumph,” and five themed essays focusing on creating, surviving, resisting, escaping, and transcending Jim Crow oppression from the late-19th-century to the Civil Rights movement. Additional shorter essays, most between 600 to 1,300 words, cover topics such as the lynching of Emmett Till and Jackie Robinson. “Geography” features ten interactive maps that give “a multi-layered look at the impact of Jim Crow on the social and political landscape of the nation.” The map themes include African-American press, Jim Crow laws inside and outside the south, and most gripping of all, the riots and lynching map that portrays a representative selection of the thousands of recorded acts of violence that occurred across the United States from 1889 to 1918. The American literature section presents interdisciplinary lesson plans designed to illustrate the connection between Jim Crow and 20th-century American writing. This section also contains an American literature book list for middle school, high school, and college-level students, including units on Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Alice Walker’s The Color Purple. The final section, teacher resources, offers more than 25 lesson plans, an interactive encyclopedia, an image gallery with historical photographs, and first hand narratives from people who experienced life under Jim Crow. This well organized and wonderfully equipped site is an invaluable resource for history and literature educators.
Resources Available: .
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
James Madison Papers
Library of Congress, American Memory.
A valuable resource for researching or teaching about James Madison’s life, the Revolution, or the Early Republic, this website provides access to 12,000 items (72,000 digital images) related to the President.These include his father’s letters, Madison’s correspondence, personal notes, drafts of letters and legislation, and legal and financial documents. Material covers the period from 1723 to 1836. Page images of correspondence can be browsed by title, name, or correspondence series or they can be searched by keyword or phrase appearing in the bibliographic records (descriptive information) of the collection. Additionally, the full text of correspondence for which transcriptions (from published editions of Madison’s papers) are available can also be searched by keyword or phrase. The site provides a timeline covering the period 1751 to 1836 that is useful in placing the events of Madison’s life historical context. Three essays are available, including one on Madison’s life and papers and one on Madison at the Federal Constitutional Convention. This website is a valuable resource for researching or teaching about Madison’s life, the Revolution, or the Early Republic.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
Alcohol, Temperance, and Prohibition
Brown University Library.
See JAH web review by Elaine Frantz Parsons.
Reviewed 2007-12-01.
A small, but useful, site with a wide range of primary source material for researching the history of the prohibition movement, temperance, or alcoholism, this archive presents broadsides, sheet music, pamphlets, and government publications related to the temperance movement and prohibition. Materials include items from the period leading up to prohibition as well as the prohibition era itself, ending with the passage of the 21st amendment in 1933. More than 1,800 items can be browsed by title, creator, or publisher. The collection is also searchable by keyword (basic and advanced searches are available). All digitized items are in the public domain. A historical essay, “Temperance and Prohibition Era Propaganda: A Study in Rhetoric” by Leah Rae Berk is available.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman’s Party
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This combined archive and exhibit offers a selection of 448 photographs from the Library’s National Woman’s Party (NWP) collection that “document the National Woman’s Party’s push for ratification of the 19th Amendment as well as its later campaign for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment.” Photographs span the years 1875 to 1938, but most date from 1913 to 1922. Visitors can browse photographs by title or subject or search the descriptive information. The site has a photo gallery of more than 50 photographs depicting NWP activists who were arrested and imprisoned for their role in suffrage protests. Additionally, the site provides a timeline of the National Woman’s Party from 1912 to 1997 that places it in historical context. The site also provides three essays: on the tactics and techniques of the National Woman’s Party suffrage campaign, a historical overview of the NWP, and on leaders of the NWP.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
NOVA: Einstein’s Big Idea
WGBH and PBS.
This companion website to a PBS NOVA documentary contains information about Einstein and his theory of relativity, as well as several special features. The site offers a timeline of Einstein’s life from his birth in 1879 to his death in 1955, a short essay on his life before his great discovery in 1905, and an explanation of the theory behind the equation. Special features include: an essay on the legacy of Einstein’s theories of special relativity and general relativity and how they affect our world; a feature exploring time dilation as predicted by Einstein’s theory of relativity; and an audio feature in which 10 top physicists briefly describe Einstein’s equatio. The site also offers two teacher guides: “Einstein’s Big Idea” and “Einstein Revealed,” 10 links to related websites, and a bibliography of eight books. Though it contains no primary source material, this site should be useful for science teachers and high school students studying Einstein, physics, and the history of science.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
France in America
Library of Congress and Bibliotheque Nationale de France.
A bilingual website (English and French), “France in America” explores the history of the French presence in North America from the early sixteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century through more than 360 manuscripts, books, maps, and other documents. The site is centered on two major themes: “the role played by France in the exploration and settlement of the continent and its participation in several events which indelibly marked the history of the United States: the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and the Louisiana Purchase.” Offering five thematic presentations—“Exploration and Knowledge,” “The Colonies,” “Franco-Indian Alliances,” “Imperial Struggles,” and “The French and North America after the Treaty of Paris”—each with a title exhibit and seven or more additional exhibits that each highlight particular items in the collection, this web site presents primary sources that can be explored through these presentations or browsed in the collections section. A timeline (1515–1804) organizes events in French America by explorations, colonization and development, and conflicts and diplomacy, and places them in the context of events in France. Additionally, there are eight descriptive maps that show various Indian groups in contact with the French and the changes in political boundaries in North America from before 1763 to the era of the Louisiana Purchase. Simple keyword and advanced searches are available. Further additions to the site are planned.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Dolley Madison Project
Holly Shulman, Virginia Center for Digital History.
See JAH web review by Robert P. Watson.
Reviewed 2007-09-01.
This attractive and easy to navigate website focuses on the life and legacy of First Lady Dolley Payne Todd Madison, wife of James Madison. There are two main sections. “Resources” includes four short background essays on different periods of Dolley Madison’s life; a timeline and chronology of her life; a short essay explaining the controversy over Dolley Madison’s first name; an alphabetical listing of her correspondents with biographical sketches; and a link to the National First Ladies’ Library page on Dolley Madison with a bibliography and lesson plans. “Exhibit” offers four presentations focused on Dolley Madison’s life: early years, years in Washington, years at Montpelier during her husband’s retirement, and widowhood. Each has a background essay, selected letters, an image gallery (41 images total), and a timeline. There is also a link to the Dolley Madison Digital Edition, a fee-based archive containing “the first-ever complete edition of all her known correspondence.” Additionally, there is a section on the use of Dolley Madison’s name and image in popular culture with a collection of 27 images. A useful information resource for those interested in Dolley Madison or teaching about her life.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
North American Women’s Letters and Diaries: Colonial Times to 1950
Stephen Rhind-Tutt.
See JAH web review by Ann Fabian.
Reviewed 2006-06-01.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This extensive archive offers approximately 150,000 pages of letters and diaries from colonial times to 1950, including 7,000 pages of previously unpublished manuscripts. Highlighted material includes extracts from the Journal of Mrs. Ann Manigault (1754–1781), the Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, letters of Phyllis Wheatley, letters of Ellen Louisa Tucker to Ralph Waldo Emerson, letters of Margaret Fuller, and the memoirs and letters of Dolly Madison, wife of James Madison. Search the database by keyword or use the advanced search to find material by such fields as author, race, religion, age, occupation, date of writing, document type, historical event, or subject. More than 80 fields have been indexed. This website is available either through one-time purchase of perpetual rights or through annual subscription (your library or institution may have a subscription). This collection is a useful archive of material for teaching about the history of women as well as for research in women’s studies, social history, and cultural history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The Lincoln Institute
The Lincoln Institute.
This extensive website offers five projects on Abraham Lincoln’s life and political career along with teacher and student resources. Each section offers essays on the persons discussed. “Mr. Lincoln’s White House” explores the people and events related to the White House in Mr. Lincoln’s time, including a look at nearby areas of the city, and a section on visitors’ impressions of Lincoln. “Mr. Lincoln and the Founders” includes an essay on Lincoln and the Declaration of Independence, a background essay, observations by Lincoln scholars, and a bibliography. “Mr. Lincoln and Freedom,” explores Lincoln and the issue of slavery. Additional topics include “Mr. Lincoln and Friends” and “Mr. Lincoln and New York.” The “Teacher Assistance” page includes links to 13 lesson plans. The site also offers a link to “Abraham Lincoln’s Classroom” with resources for students and teachers, including quizzes, quotes, featured commentary, and links to maps. This site is an outstanding resource for material on teaching about Lincoln and the events of his presidency, as well as an excellent starting point for research on the Lincoln presidency and the politics and people of the Civil War era.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Early American Imprints, Series II: Shaw-Shoemaker, 1801–1819
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This database is the most essential collection of written materials for historical research in American history from 1801–1819. It provides full-text access to nearly 4.5 million pages of 36,000 books, pamphlets, broadsides and other imprints published in the U.S. during this period. Gazetteers, almanacs, juvenile literature, chapbooks, hymnals, campaign literature, novels, slave narratives, spelling books, school readers, treaties, maps, atlases, advertisements, diaries, autobiographies, and much more are all included. Most of these materials were originally detailed in the bibliography compiled by Ralph Shaw and Richard Shoemaker. This collection, long available on microfiche, is made available here as a digital, fully searchable online database. It complements Readex’s other Early American Imprints series of material from the period of 1639–1800.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2006-09-06.

www.history
Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project
James N. Gregory, University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Peter Cole.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This collection of hundreds of primary sources documents the long history of struggle for equal rights by various ethnic group sin Seattle, including Filipino, Chinese, Japanese and Native Americans, Jews, Latinos, and African Americans. The website integrates labor rights movements with struggles for political rights, as is evident in “special sections” that highlight the Chicano/a movement, the Black Panther Party, Filipino Cannery Unionism, the United Construction Workers Association, Communism, and the United Farm Workers. Each section brings together oral histories, documents, newspapers, and photographs that are accompanied by written and video commentary to provide historical context. The collection of more than 70 oral histories of activists is especially useful for understanding the lived experience of racism and its especially subtle workings in the Pacific Northwest. Together, these resources provide important national context for the civil rights struggle, too often understood as a solely southern phenomenon.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2006-11-22.

www.history
Historical Thinking Matters
CHNM and Stanford University.
See JAH web review by Eric Sandweiss.
Reviewed 2012-06-01.
Four guided investigations designed to “teach students how to critically read primary sources and how to critique and construct historical narratives” lie at the heart of this website. Topics are in twentieth-century U.S. history: the Spanish American War, the Scopes Trial, Social Security, and Rosa Parks. Each topic includes a short introductory video, a timeline of events, a central question to answer based on an examination of a series of primary sources, and webquest extension activities. For example, the Rosa Parks investigation poses the question: “Why did the boycott of Montgomery’s busses succeed?” After completing a simple login, students read a series of annotated and well-contextualized documents� including letters written by the boycot organizers, a speech by Martin Luther King Jr., and an interview of a woman working in Montgomery�answer guiding questions about these documents in a virtual notebook, and draw on these responses to answer the main question. An extensive section for teachers provides lessons plans, information on U.S. history standards, examples of student work, and additional resources. The website also includes a useful introduction to the idea of historical thinking and approaches for bringing historical thinking skills into the classroom.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-13.