home | many pasts | evidence | www.history | blackboard | reference
talking history | syllabi | students | teachers | puzzle | about us
search: go!
advanced search - go!

There are 176 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.
See JAH web review by Jeffrey Shandler.
Reviewed 2012-03-01.
Introduces the activities of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, located in Washington, DC, and its important collections, in addition to presenting interactive exhibitions and providing resources for study of the Holocaust and related subjects. The site is composed of five sections: education, research, history, remembrance, and conscience. The education section includes material to introduce the subject of the Holocaust to middle- and secondary-level students; the full text of a resource book for teachers; information on publications, programs, fellowships, and internships for scholars, faculty, and university students; and 45 bibliographies arranged by country. The research section contains a survivors registry; material about the Museum’s Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies; an international directory of activities relating to Holocaust-era assets; information on the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research; searchable catalogs pertaining to the Museum’s collections and library; and examples of artworks, artifacts, documents, photographs, films, videos, oral histories, and music. The history section includes the Holocaust Learning Center, with images, essays, and documents on 75 subjects such as anti-semitism, refugees, pogroms, extermination camps, and resistance. The remembrance section provides material on a recent commemorative ceremony undertaken by high school students from Germany, Luxembourg, Washington, D.C., and communities in the U.S. in which churches had been burned. The final section, devoted to the “Committee on Conscience” contains information on current genocidal practices in Sudan. An invaluable site for students as an introduction to Holocaust-related subjects, for scholars as a resource for further studies, and for others as a way to acknowledge the presence of the Holocaust in contemporary culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-12.

www.history
Digital History
Steven Mintz and Sara McNeil.
See JAH web review by Simon Appleford and Vernon Burton.
Reviewed 2008-03-01.
Provides multimedia resources and links for teaching American history and conducting basic research, while focusing on slavery, ethnic history, private life, technological achievement, and American film. Presents more than 600 documents pertaining to American politics, diplomacy, social history, slavery, Mexican American history, and Native American history, searchable by author, time period, subject, and keyword, and annotated with essays of 300–500 words each. The site offers a full U.S. history textbook and more than 1,500 searchable and briefly annotated links to American history-related sites, including approximately 150 links to historic Supreme Court decisions, 330 links to audio files of historic speeches, and more than 450 links to audio files and transcripts of historians discussing their own books. Also includes five high school lesson plans; 39 fact sheets with quotations and study questions on major historical topics; 10 essays (800 words) on past controversies, such as the Vietnam War, socialism, and the war on poverty; seven essays presenting historical background on more recent controversies, such as hostage crises and NATO in Kosovo; and essays of more than 10,000 words each on the history of American film and private life in America. Four current exhibits offer 217 photographs, ca. 1896–1903, from the Calhoun Industrial School in Alabama, a freedmen’s school; 19 watercolor sketches by a Civil War soldier; seven letters between 18th-century English historian Catharine Macaulay and American historian Mercy Otis Warren; and an 1865 letter from Frederick Douglass to Mary Todd Lincoln. A valuable site for high school students and teachers looking for comprehensive guidance from professional historians on the current state of debate on many topics in American history.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
California Gold: Northern California Folk Music from the Thirties
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site features 35 hours of folk and popular music sound recordings from several European, Slavic, Middle Eastern, and English- and Spanish-speaking communities. The Work Projects Administration California Folk Music Project collected these 817 songs, in 12 languages and representing 185 musicians, in Northern California between 1938 and 1940. The collection also includes 168 photographs of musicians, 45 scale drawings and sketches of instruments, and numerous written documents, including ethnographic field reports and notes, song transcriptions, published articles, and project correspondence. Organized by folk music collector Sidney Robertson Cowell, sponsored by the University of California, Berkeley, and cosponsored by the Archive of the American Folk Song, this was one of the earliest ethnographic field projects to document folk and popular music of such diverse origin in one region. In addition to folk music of indigenous and immigrant groups, the collection includes popular songs from the Gold Rush and Barbary Coast eras, medicine show tunes, and ragtime numbers. In addition, short essays describe the California Folk Music Project and the ethnographic work of Sidney Robertson Cowell. This collection is an excellent resource for learning about ethnographic research practices as well as about cultures of various California ethnic groups.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
American Variety Stage: Vaudeville and Popular Entertainment, 1870–1920
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Robert W. Snyder.
Reviewed 2004-07-01.
This collection documents the development of vaudeville and other popular entertainment forms from the 1870s to the 1920s. It includes 334 English and Yiddish playscripts, 146 theater programs and playbills, 61 motion pictures, and 10 sound recordings. This site also features 143 photos and 29 memorabilia items documenting the life and career of magician Harry Houdini and an essay with links to specific items entitled “Houdini: A Biographical Chronology.” Search by keyword or browse the subject and author indexes. The site is linked to the Library of Congress Exhibition “Bob Hope and American Variety.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
American Leaders Speak: Recordings from World War I and the 1920 Election
American Memory, Library of Congress.
Consists of 59 sound recordings of speeches by American leaders produced from 1918 to 1920 on the Nation’s Forum record label. The speeches—by such prominent public figures as Warren G. Harding, James M. Cox, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Samuel Gompers, Henry Cabot Lodge, John J. Pershing, Will H. Hays, A. Mitchell Palmer, and Rabbi Stephen S. Wise—deal for the most part with issues and events related to World War I and the 1920 presidential election. Additional topics include social unrest, Americanism, bolshevism, taxes, and business practices. Speeches range from 1 to 5 minutes in length. A special presentation, “From War to Normalcy,” introduces the Nation’s Forum Collection with representative recordings from World War I and the 1920 election, including Harding’s famous pronouncement that Americans need “not nostrums but normalcy.” This site includes photographs of speakers and of the actual recording disk labels, as well as text versions of the speeches.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-03.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
South Texas Border, 1900–1920: Photographs from the Robert Runyon Collection
American Memory, Library of Congress and University of Texas, Austin.
See JAH web review by Neil Foley.
Reviewed 2003-03-01.
A collection featuring the life’s work of commercial photographer Robert Runyon (1881–1968), totalling more than 8,000 images, that document the history and development of South Texas and the border, including the U.S. military presence in the area prior to and during World War I and the growth and development of the Rio Grande Valley in the early 1900s. A special section presents nine of Runyon’s 350 photographs of the Mexican Revolution (1910–20) in Matamoros, Monterrey, Ciudad Victoria, and the Texas border area from 1913 through 1916. Includes a 900-word essay on the Revolution and a 1,100-word biographical essay on Runyon. An Ameritech Award Winner. Of use to those studying the history of documentary photography, images of the Mexican Revolution, and Texas history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota.
See JAH web review by Joel Perlmann.
Reviewed 2003-06-01.
Currently provides 22 census data samples and 65 million records from 13 federal censuses covering the period 1850–1990. These data “collectively comprise our richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population.” The project has applied uniform codes to previously published and newly created data samples. Rather than offering data in aggregated tabular form, the site offers data on individuals and households, allowing researchers to tailor tabulations to their specific interests. Includes data on fertility, marriage, immigration, internal migration, work, occupational structure, education, ethnicity, and household composition. Offers extensive documentation on procedures used to transform data and includes 13 links to other census-related sites. A complementary project to provide multiple data samples from every country from the 1960s to 2000 is underway. Currently this international series offers information and interpretive essays on Kenya, Vietnam, Mexico, Hungary, and Brazil. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social history, the site will probably be forbidding to novices.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Bethlehem Digital History Project
Bethlehem Area Public Library and Reeves Library, Moravian College.
See JAH web review by Timothy D. Hall.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
This collection of materials addresses the Moravian community of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, from its founding in 1741 to 1844, when the community first opened to non-Moravians. It is still under construction. Most documents are available in three formats: facsimile of original in German type, transcription, and translation into English. All documents may be read in English. A 650-word essay introduces visitors to Bethlehem history. The community kept a diary that visitors may read for the years 1742 to 1745. The Journal of the Commission of the Brethren of Bethlehem, from 1752 to 1760, allows further access to the inner workings of the community. The death register currently lists 400-word obituaries for five women and six men. Birth and marriage registers are to be added to the site. Moravians of this era read memoirs (2000–3000 words) at the funerals of community members, sometimes incorporating autobiographical writing. Visitors may read 34 of these memoirs. The records of the community also include four maps, a survey, and the ledgers of the town finances from 1747 to 1765. Inventories of four shops may also be examined. Other material includes a 32-page 1876 historical sketch of the Bethlehem Seminary for Young Ladies, a 19-page scholarly essay on the Moravian approach to business, and a 1762 discussion of how to finance the Single Sisters’ Choir. Visitors may search the site by subject. The site will be very interesting for research in colonial history and the history of religion in America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
City Sites: Multimedia Essays on New York and Chicago, 1870s-1930s
University of Birmingham and University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
An “electronic book,” composed of 10 multimedia essays by European and American scholars on modern urban culture in New York and Chicago. Hyperlinks allow readers to navigate thematically between essays. Ranging in length from 6,000 to 12,000 words, these essays explicitly use recent literary theory to explore urban landscapes, representations, and history. Visitors may follow particular “pathways” across essays for topics relating to architecture, leisure, race, and space. The New York essays deal with the following subjects: Harlem as refuge and ghetto in modernist art and writing; Times Square as represented in New Year’s celebrations; modern ways of seeing revealed in images of the Flatiron Building; an examination of the work of architectural illustrator Hugh Ferris in order to uncover “ways in which the modern imagination expressed itself through architectural discourse”; and tensions between turn-of-the-century representations of the Lower East Side by reformers and others. Chicago essays cover the portrayal of African-American urban styles in the art of Archibald Motley, Jr.; ways the city has been represented as a “gateway”; how urban identities are constructed and experiences portrayed in the novel Sister Carrie; ways that racial difference has been iterated in various discursive fields to shape national identity; and Maxwell Street as a site where urban renewal has displaced distinctive ethnic neighborhood cultures. Essays include dozens of photographs and multimedia displays. Includes a bibliography of more than 400 titles. As a demonstration of “ways in which new multimedia technologies can enhance conventional scholarly understandings of urban culture,” this site may represent the shape of things to come in some scholarly fields. Part of The 3Cities Project (see separate “History Matters” entry for description of larger site).
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2001-09-14.

www.history
Kentuckiana Digital Library
Kentucky Virtual Library.
Provides a wealth of historical material from 15 Kentucky colleges, universities, libraries, and historical societies. Includes nearly 8,000 photographs; 95 full-text books, manuscripts, and journals, from 1784 to 1971; 94 oral history interviews; 78 issues of the magazine Mountain Life & Work, from 1925–62; and 22 issues of the publication Works Progress Administration in Kentucky: Narrative Reports, covering 1935–37. Includes photographic collections of renowned photographer Russell Lee, who documented health conditions resulting from coal industry practices; Roy Stryker, head of the Farm Security Administration photographic project; and others that provide images of a variety of cities, towns, schools, camps, and disappearing cultures. Presents oral histories pertaining to Supreme Court Justice Stanley F. Reed, U.S. Senator John Sherman Cooper, the Frontier Nursing Service, American military veterans, Appalachian fiddlers, and the transition of an area from farming to an industrial economy. Texts include Civil War diaries, religious tracts, speeches, correspondence, and scrapbooks. Includes documents on colonization societies, civil rights, education, railroads, feuding, the Kentucky Derby, exploits of Daniel Boone, pioneer surgery, and a recollection of Abraham Lincoln. Valuable for those studying changes in the social and cultural history of the state.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
First American West: The Ohio River Valley, 1750–1820
American Memory, Library of Congress; University of Chicago Library; and Filson Historical Society.
Provides approximately 15,000 pages of historical published and unpublished manuscript material related to the migration of Europeans west into the Ohio River Valley during the latter half of the 18th century and beginning of the 19th. Includes books, pamphlets, newspapers, periodicals, journals, letters, legal documents, pictorial images, maps, ledgers, and other types of material. The collection, from the University of Chicago Library and Filson Historical Society of Louisville, Kentucky, was started in the late 19th century by a group dedicated to preserving documents related to Kentucky and Ohio River Valley history. The site includes a special presentation with a 6,500-word hyperlink-filled essay arranged into five sections on contested lands, peoples and migration, empires and politics, Western life and culture, and the construction of a Western past. The site offers materials on encounters between Europeans and native peoples, the lives of African-American slaves in the area, the role of institutions such as churches and schools, the position of women in this society, the thoughts of naturalists and other scientists, and activities of the migrants, including travel, land acquisition, planting, navigation of rivers, and trade. Well-known personages represented include Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr, James Madison, and William Henry Harrison. Includes a 26-title bibliography and annotated links to 19 related sites. Valuable for students and serious researchers of early American history, the history of cross-cultural encounters in the West, frontier history, and the construction of the nation’s past.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-19.

www.history
Centennial Celebration
Bureau of the Census.
To celebrate the centennial of the Census Bureau, this site provides access to a wealth of statistical information on the U.S. population. While most materials offer recent data, more than 30 comprehensive reports and tables are included that track decade-by-decade demographic-related shifts, including urban and rural population change, population of the largest 100 cities, population density, and homeownership rates. Additional material details shifts in U.S. international trade in goods and services from 1960–2000; poverty from 1959–2000; race and Hispanic origin of foreign-born populations from 1850–1990; interracial married couples from 1960–1998; and marital status of women at first birth from 1930–1994. Visitors can find current detailed information on social and economic characteristics of African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indian and Alaska Natives, and of baby boomers. The North American Industry Classification System offers recent economic data on eight business sectors. American FactFinder offers detailed maps with demographic information for individual blocks and for larger areas. Yearly editions of Statistical Abstract of the United States from 1995 to 2001 are included, along with charts of demographic information according to categories such as age, ancestry, and income. In addition, the site provides a collection of “fast facts” for each decade of the 20th century, four historical timelines, and approximately 20 photographs related to the census. Valuable for students and professional historians needing demographic and other statistical information on population trends.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-04.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Jews in America: Our Story
Center for Jewish History.
See JAH web review by Daniel Greene.
Reviewed 2006-06-01.
The history of Jews in America from the 17th century to the present is explored in this website through essays, images, video presentations, and interactive timelines. “It is a portrait of American Jews—and a portrait of America.” It presents this story through eight sections focused particular time periods: 1654–1776; 1777–1829; 1830–1880; 1881–1919; 1920–1939; 1940–1948; 1949–1967; and 1968-present. Each section has short topical essays explaining the period (an introduction, world events, politics, religion and community, and daily life; some sections add essays on arts and entertainment, sports, or science), video and audio presentation(s), an image gallery, and books for further reading. A number of sections also have “featured artifacts” that examine a particular cultural artifact in greater detail. The timeline has information about the events on the timeline and links to related websites about the event, where available. Each image is accompanied by a description and a larger size image. The 590 images in the collection can also be viewed in a separate gallery. A keyword search is available. This site is of interest to anyone teaching or researching the history of Jews in America, cultural history, ethnicity, or art history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.
See JAH web review by Clare Corbould.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This extensive, well-designed website features images, essays, lesson plans, and maps all focused on the movements of African Americans from the 1400s to the present. The site is built around the history of 13 African American migration experiences: the transatlantic slave trade (1450s-1867), runaway journeys (1630s-1865), the domestic slave trade (1760s-1865), colonization and emigration (1783–1910s), Haitian Immigration (1791–1809), Western migration (1840s-1970), Northern migration (1840s- 1890), the Great Migration (1916–1930), the Second Great Migration (1940–1970), Caribbean immigration (1900-present), the return South migration (1970-present), Haitian immigration in the 20th century (1970-present), and African immigration (1970-present). Each section includes an extensive image gallery with 60 or more images, two or more color maps and charts, an overview, short web essays on aspects of the migration with links to excerpts from various works on the subject, educational materials, a bibliography, and links to related websites. There are more than 67 detailed and informative color maps and more than 8,300 images available. Educational materials include at least two lesson plans (most have five or more) in each section and links to related resources. More than 90 lesson plans are available. An interactive timeline extends from the 15th to the 21st century and places migration in the context of U.S. history and the history of the African Diaspora. Searching is limited to a keyword search.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
France in America
Library of Congress and Bibliotheque Nationale de France.
A bilingual website (English and French), “France in America” explores the history of the French presence in North America from the early sixteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century through more than 360 manuscripts, books, maps, and other documents. The site is centered on two major themes: “the role played by France in the exploration and settlement of the continent and its participation in several events which indelibly marked the history of the United States: the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and the Louisiana Purchase.” Offering five thematic presentations—“Exploration and Knowledge,” “The Colonies,” “Franco-Indian Alliances,” “Imperial Struggles,” and “The French and North America after the Treaty of Paris”—each with a title exhibit and seven or more additional exhibits that each highlight particular items in the collection, this web site presents primary sources that can be explored through these presentations or browsed in the collections section. A timeline (1515–1804) organizes events in French America by explorations, colonization and development, and conflicts and diplomacy, and places them in the context of events in France. Additionally, there are eight descriptive maps that show various Indian groups in contact with the French and the changes in political boundaries in North America from before 1763 to the era of the Louisiana Purchase. Simple keyword and advanced searches are available. Further additions to the site are planned.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Poetic Waves: Angel Island
Garman Yip.
See JAH web review by Erika Lee.
Reviewed 2007-03-01.
This small, well-designed site uses a photo tour, profiles, poetry, a timeline, and an image gallery to present the compelling story of the 175,000 Asian immigrants who entered America between 1910 and 1940 through the Angel Island immigration station in California’s San Francisco Bay. Many of the immigrants were detained for up to two years at the station. The five-part tour provides an overview and a photographic and video tour of the station’s buildings and facilities, along with a description of its operations. “Poetry” allows visitors to listen to and read (in both English and Chinese) five of the many poems that Chinese immigrants carved into the walls of the station’s barracks. “People” uses text and audio to tell the individual stories of five immigrants. The timeline covers the history of Angel Island and Asian immigration from 1840 to the present. A small image gallery of 10 images includes an immigration document, building interiors, a page of interrogation notes, and an image of poetry on barrack walls. Although it offers few primary documents, this is a useful resource for those teaching the history of Asian immigration to America and is of interest to anyone wanting to learn more about the Chinese-American experience.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-06.

www.history
Slavery in New York
New York Historical Society.
Focusing on the "collective and personal experiences of Africans and African-Americans” in New York City, this collection presents nine galleries that explore various themes and time periods in New York City’s history of slavery, the Atlantic slave trade and New York City, slavery in Dutch New York, the growth of slavery in British Colonial New York, freedom for blacks in Revolutionary-War New York, the Gradual Emancipation Act of 1799, free blacks in the public life of post-revolutionary New York; black life in New York 1815–1827, Emancipation Day July 4 1827, and the history of scholarship on slavery in New York City. Each gallery has three panels: a gallery overview, a main thematic presentation, and one focusing on people, places, and documents. Of special interest are two interactive maps with timelines in the Dutch New York gallery and the Revolutionary War gallery; a small, but interesting, picture gallery on the portrayal of black’s in New York City’s public life; and profiles of nine African Americans who lived in New York City during the early republic. There is a thirty-four-page teacher’s guide (available for download or printing in .pdf format) with seven lesson plans, a guide to classroom materials, a brief history of slavery in New York City, and a select bibliography.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-07.

www.history
Seattle Black Panther Party History and Memory Project
Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project.
In 1968, the Black Panther Party for Self Defense established a chapter in Seattle, one of the first outside of California. This website, devoted to portraying the history and collecting the memories of that chapter, is “the most extensive online collection of materials” for any Black Panther Party chapter. It includes 13 oral histories and brief biographies of key Black Panther Party members, 53 photographs documenting Black Panther events in the late 1960s, more than 100 news stories covering Party activities from 1968 to 1981 (four years after the Party was dissolved), testimony and exhibits from the 1970 Congressional Hearings investigating the Party, and all five issues of the Seattle Black Panther Party “Bulletin.” A “Slide Show” highlighting some of these materials is a good place to begin for those unfamiliar with Black Panther Party history. This website is part of the larger Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project, which provides extensive materials that can serve as historical context, such as a guide to Civil Rights groups from the 1910s to the 1970s, 14 2,000-word essays on the ethnic press in Seattle, 13 other “Special Sections” on topics such as segregation in Seattle, and 37 in-depth essays on historical topics such as the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s. In addition, a “For Teachers” section provides eight lesson plans using the website’s material for middle and high school students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2009-02-05.

www.history
Dime Novels and Penny Dreadfuls
Stanford University.
Presents more than 2,300 images of front and back covers as well as nine full-text selections of American “dime novels,” their British counterparts, the “penny dreadfuls,” and weekly story papers that flourished in the mid- to late-19th century. Contents selected from Stanford University’s Dime Novel and Story Paper Collection. The site offers three “guided tours”—consisting of selected images and essays of approximately 1,500 words each—on print processes; publishers, authors, and fictional heroes; and the entire Stanford Collection. The full-text selections include stories starring such heroes as Nick Carter, Buffalo Bill, Jesse James, Deadwood Dick, Fred Fearnot, and Calamity Jane. The site provides basic information on each title—a few sentences on plot and publishing history—and includes indexing according to various features: subject, genre, setting, intended audience age and gender, and type of graphic material. At present, searching functions are not available, but users may browse images by title and feature. Subject indexing of cover iconography is especially valuable as listings are organized according to depictions of ethnicity/nationality, occupation, types of places, types of sports and recreations, types of violence, and types of gestures and actions classified according to gender of character portrayed. Includes a 27-title bibliography and an annotated timeline. Very valuable for those studying 19th-century American popular culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project
Densho.
See JAH web review by Allan W. Austin.
Reviewed 2005-06-01.
Over 750 hours of video interviews and 10,000 historic images provide first-hand accounts of Japanese Americans unjustly incarcerated by the U.S. government during World War II. Densho uses the accounts of individuals to explore principles of democracy and to encourage tolerance and justice in situations when citizens and legal immigrants are confused with enemies. The website features “Sites of Shame,” an overview of all types of detention facilities that held Japanese Americans, and “Causes of the Incarceration,” an examination of four motivations for the forced removal. Other primary sources found on the site are newspaper accounts, government orders and historical photographs. Teacher resources include social studies lessons (grades 4–12) with multimedia materials and classroom activities. A terminology list and glossary; timeline; and web, printed, and video sources provide interested viewers with further avenues for exploring this significant historical event.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2009-10-06.

www.history
American History 102: Civil War to the Present
Stanley K. Schultz, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
This site reflects efforts to teach an American history survey course entirely through technology. Offers student lecture notes; 32 biographical sketches of prominent figures treated in the course, searchable by occupation, name, and era; bibliographic information; exams and review sheets; and a gallery of more than 200 photographs, many of which are taken from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The overall presentation is somewhat fragmented, but the site is rich in resources. Perhaps most valuable is a directory of history websites, organized by subject and time period. Professor Stanley Schultz and his associates have designed the site as a supplement for his videotaped lectures on the post-Civil War period.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Emma Goldman Papers
Berkeley Digital Library.
This site provides primary resources on Emma Goldman (1869–1940), a major figure in the history of radicalism and feminism in the United States prior to her deportation in 1919. Includes selections from 4 books by Goldman; 18 published essays and pamphlets; 4 speeches; 49 letters; 5 newspaper accounts of her activities; nearly 40 photographs, illustrations, and facsimiles of documents. Materials in this site were selected from those gathered and organized by the Emma Goldman Papers Project, an ongoing effort that has resulted in a 69-reel microfilm edition of her papers and other publications. Additional items in the site include selections from a traveling exhibition, issues of “Open Road: The Newsletter of the Emma Goldman Papers,” 4 sample documents from the forthcoming book edition of her papers; and a curriculum for middle and high school students to aid the study of freedom of expression, women’s rights, anti-militarism, and social change. The site reproduces a 6,500-word essay on the project’s history and a 9,000-word bibliographic essay.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-04.

www.history
American Family Immigration History Center
The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation Inc..
See JAH web review by Hasia Diner and Shira Kohn.
Reviewed 2010-06-01.
Created by a “non-profit organization to raise funds for the restoration and preservation of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island,” this site provides a searchable database containing records on the more than 25 million passengers and ship crew members who passed through Ellis Island between 1892 and 1924. In addition to a basic passenger record (name, ethnicity, place of residence, date of arrival, age, marital status, ship of travel, and place of departure), users can view a copy of the original ship manifest (a text version is also available), and even a picture of the ship. If no match occurs on a name spelling, the site provides information for names with close or alternate spellings. The site includes 2 well-done presentations: “Family Histories,” relates the ways that 6 Americans of diverse ethnic backgrounds found information on their ancestors; and a timeline, “The Peopling of America,” covers six periods from pre-1790 to 2000, with graphs, photographs, immigration statistics geared to place of origin, and a 2,000-word essay on immigration history. Easy to use, this site is an essential resource for online genealogical research and is a valuable introduction to immigration history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-04.

www.history
Map Collections: 1500–2003
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site presents a large number of maps from the 16th century to the present day focusing on Americana and “cartographic treasures.” The materials are organized into seven thematic categories—“Cities and Towns”; “Conservation and Environment”; “Discovery and Exploration”; “Cultural Landscapes”; “Military Battles and Campaigns”; “Transportation and Communication”; and “General Maps.” Sections include a number of “special presentations,” including several essays ranging from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Users may zoom in to view details and download maps. 17 specific map collections contained within this larger site are described in detail in the following History Matters entries: “Discovery and Exploration”; “The American Revolution and Its Era”; “Railroad Maps, 1828–1900”; “American Colonization Society Collection: Maps of Liberia, 1830–1870”; “Panoramic Maps, 1847–1929”; “Civil War Maps”; and “Mapping the National Parks.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The Northern Great Plains, 1880–1920: Photographs from the Fred Hulstrand and F. A. Pazandak Photograph Collections
American Memory, Library of Congress and North Dakota State University.
Furnishes approximately 900 photographs from two collections at the Institute for Regional Studies at North Dakota State University. A professional photographer from northeastern North Dakota who sought to document the settlement of the Great Plains produced the “Fred Hulstrand History in Pictures Collection.” The “F. A. Pazandak Photography Collection” includes photographs taken by a southeastern North Dakota farmer as mechanization began to change his family farm. Images portray everyday rural and small town life, mostly from 1880–1920, and include shots of farmers, farm machinery, children, one-room schools, and workshops. The site also provides a historical overview of North Dakota, a 300-word history of farm machinery companies, and presentations entitled “Implements Used on the Farm,” “Schooling,” “Women,” “Sod Homes,” “Immigrants,” “Steam Engines and Tractors,” “Hired Hands,” and “Golden Age of Agriculture.” An annotated bibliography of 61 titles provides a guide for further research. This site includes important visual documentation on changes in rural communities and farming practices during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.