home | many pasts | evidence | www.history | blackboard | reference
talking history | syllabi | students | teachers | puzzle | about us
search: go!
advanced search - go!

There are 141 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.
See JAH web review by Jeffrey Shandler.
Reviewed 2012-03-01.
Introduces the activities of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, located in Washington, DC, and its important collections, in addition to presenting interactive exhibitions and providing resources for study of the Holocaust and related subjects. The site is composed of five sections: education, research, history, remembrance, and conscience. The education section includes material to introduce the subject of the Holocaust to middle- and secondary-level students; the full text of a resource book for teachers; information on publications, programs, fellowships, and internships for scholars, faculty, and university students; and 45 bibliographies arranged by country. The research section contains a survivors registry; material about the Museum’s Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies; an international directory of activities relating to Holocaust-era assets; information on the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research; searchable catalogs pertaining to the Museum’s collections and library; and examples of artworks, artifacts, documents, photographs, films, videos, oral histories, and music. The history section includes the Holocaust Learning Center, with images, essays, and documents on 75 subjects such as anti-semitism, refugees, pogroms, extermination camps, and resistance. The remembrance section provides material on a recent commemorative ceremony undertaken by high school students from Germany, Luxembourg, Washington, D.C., and communities in the U.S. in which churches had been burned. The final section, devoted to the “Committee on Conscience” contains information on current genocidal practices in Sudan. An invaluable site for students as an introduction to Holocaust-related subjects, for scholars as a resource for further studies, and for others as a way to acknowledge the presence of the Holocaust in contemporary culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-12.

www.history
Spanish-American War in Motion Pictures
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Bonnie M. Miller.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This site features 68 motion pictures of the Spanish-American War and the Philippine Revolution produced by the Edison Manufacturing Company and the American Mutoscope & Biograph Company between 1898 and 1901. These films include footage of troops, ships, notable figures, and parades shot in the U.S., Cuba, and the Philippines, in addition to reenactments of battles and related events. A Special Presentation puts the motion pictures in chronological order; brief essays provide a historical context for their filming. This site is indexed by subject and searchable by keyword, and includes a link to resources and documents pertaining to the war in the Library’s Hispanic Division.
Resources Available: TEXT, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
New York Public Library Digital Gallery
New York Public Library.
This massive collection presents more than 550,000 images relevant to both U.S. and world history, from the earliest days of print culture to the present. These images consist primarily of historical maps, posters, prints and photographs, illuminated manuscript pages, and images drawn from published books. For browsing, the materials are divided by subject heading, library of origin, the name of the item’s creator and/or publisher, and by collection: Arts & Literature; Cities & Building; Culture & Society; History & Geography; Industry & Technology; Nature & Science; and Printing & Graphics. Within these broad collection headings, the images are further subdivided into more specific groupings, for example, Indonesian dance, dress and fashion, Civil War medical care, and New York City apartment buildings. Keyword and Advanced Search options are useful for those wishing to locate specific items. All images can be downloaded for personal use and are accompanied by detailed biographic information, though users will have to turn elsewhere for further historical context.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Exploring Amistad: Race and the Boundaries of Freedom in Maritime Antebellum America
Mystic Seaport Museum.
See JAH web review by John David Smith.
Reviewed 2001-09-01.
Presents more than 500 primary documents relating to the 1839–1842 revolt of enslaved Africans aboard the schooner Amistad, their legal struggles in the United States, and the multifaceted cultural and social dimensions of their case. The site features a searchable library that contains 32 items from personal papers, 33 legal decisions and arguments, 18 selections from the “popular media,” including pamphlets, journal articles, reports, a playbill, and a poem; 103 government publications, 28 images, 11 maps and nautical charts, and 310 newspaper articles and editorials. Also includes suggestions for using these materials in the classroom, a timeline, 28 links to other resources, and a ”living the history" component that encourages user feedback and participation. A visually attractive, well-conceived site that provides a wealth of materials for students of slavery, race, politics, and print culture in antebellum America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-17.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Avalon Project: Documents in Law, History, and Government
William C. Fray and Lisa A. Spar.
This website, sponsored by Yale Law School with the International Relations and Security Network (ISN), is a collection of over 3,500 full-text documents relevant to the fields of law, history, economics, politics, diplomacy, and government. The documents are divided into four century categories: pre-18th, 18th, 19th, and 20th. Includes treaties, presidential papers and addresses, and colonial charters, as well as state and federal constitutional and legal documents. The documents are grouped into 64 Major Collection categories as well, such as Thomas Jefferson’s papers, American diplomacy, and the Cold War. All materials can be accessed through an alphabetical list, through the Major Collections page, through the four century pages, or by a keyword search. All of the search modes are easily navigable. Though most of these documents are directly related to American history, the site also includes over 100 documents on ancient, medieval, and Renaissance history, European history, and modern diplomatic documents such as the Hamas Covenant. The site is ideal for researching American diplomacy, constitutional, political, and legal history. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
CWIHP: Cold War International History Project
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
See JAH web review by Mark Atwood Lawrence.
Reviewed 2013-12-01.
Much scholarship on the Cold War has been written by Westerners with little access to sources in Soviet archives. This extensive collection seeks to remedy the holes in Cold War historiography by actively collecting sources from the former Communist bloc. Thousands of documents in the diplomatic history of the Cold War are currently available, stretching in time from the 1945–46 Soviet occupation of northern Iran through the late 1990s. These sources, all carefully annotated, are divided both into collections and by geographic region. The 50 document collections cover a wide range of topics, including both specific events (1954 Geneva Conference on Indochina, 1956 Hungarian Revolution, 1980–81 Polish Crisis) and broader topics stretching over longer periods of time (Economic Cold War, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, The Cold War in Africa). The collections vary widely in size, between three and several hundred documents, and include primarily official documents and communication—meeting minutes, memoranda, transcribed conversations between leaders, reports, and several personal letters and diary entries.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-10-28.

www.history
South Texas Border, 1900–1920: Photographs from the Robert Runyon Collection
American Memory, Library of Congress and University of Texas, Austin.
See JAH web review by Neil Foley.
Reviewed 2003-03-01.
A collection featuring the life’s work of commercial photographer Robert Runyon (1881–1968), totalling more than 8,000 images, that document the history and development of South Texas and the border, including the U.S. military presence in the area prior to and during World War I and the growth and development of the Rio Grande Valley in the early 1900s. A special section presents nine of Runyon’s 350 photographs of the Mexican Revolution (1910–20) in Matamoros, Monterrey, Ciudad Victoria, and the Texas border area from 1913 through 1916. Includes a 900-word essay on the Revolution and a 1,100-word biographical essay on Runyon. An Ameritech Award Winner. Of use to those studying the history of documentary photography, images of the Mexican Revolution, and Texas history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
Documents from the Continental Congress and Constitutional Convention
Library of Congress, American Memory Project.
This archive offers 274 documents relating to the work of the Continental Congress and the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, including manuscript annotations. The collection includes extracts of the journals of Congress, resolutions, proclamations, committee reports, treaties, documents relating to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, extracts of proceedings of state assemblies and conventions relating to the ratification of the Constitution, several essays on ratification of the Constitution, and early printed versions of the U.S. Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. It includes 253 titles dating from 1774 to 1788 relating to the Constitutional Congress and twenty-one dating from 1786 to 1789 relating to the Constitutional Convention. The collection can be browsed through an alphabetical list of subjects or searched using keywords. An advanced search is also available. Additionally, two timelines that together cover the period 1764 to 1789 and an essay entitled “To Form a More Perfect Union” provide historical context for the documents through an overview of the main events of the era of the Revolution. A useful resource for studying the history of the revolutionary era and the Constitution.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-14.

www.history
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum.
See JAH web review by Gregory Wilson.
Reviewed 2002-06-02.
The heart of this collection of material about Lyndon Baines Johnson is the group of 64 oral history interviews selected from a collection of more than 1,000. Oral histories, from 35 to 200 pages, include interviews with Dean Rusk, Johnson’s secretary, Bess Abell, Robert MacNamara, Thurgood Marshall, and Billy Graham. Of the 2,600 recorded telephone conversations in the Johnson archives, the site provides transcribed samples of conversations with five people, including Adam Clayton Powell and Jacqueline Kennedy. The site also links to a C-SPAN collection of more than 800 transcribed recorded excerpts and full conversations Johnson had while in office. A selection of 20 speeches and nine messages to Congress are available in transcription and address issues such as the Great Society and limitations on the war in Vietnam. Also provided is an advertisement from the 1964 presidential campaign. A selection of 50 facsimile entries from Johnson’s office diary, kept by his secretaries, includes meals as well as events of his first day in office, his reaction to incidents in the Gulf of Tonkin, a meeting with George Wallace about sending federal troops to Selma, and Johnson’s announcement that he would not seek re-election. Diary entries range from three to 20 pages. Visitors may listen to two audio files of less than a minute each in which Johnson is sworn in following Kennedy’s assassination and comments on events. Facsimiles of 98 National Security Action memoranda discuss policies towards Vietnam, nuclear weapons, and Latin America, among other issues. A collection of 37 photographs depict Johnson in meetings with other important figures of the time, including Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. Biographical information about Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson is provided in two chronologies. In addition, an exhibit from the Johnson museum provides a 6,200-word essay about events in Johnson’s lifetime. This site will be very useful for research about Johnson’s presidency and major events of the 1960s.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Home for a membership organization of more than 500 colleges and universities worldwide, this site provides “access to a vast archive of social science data for research and instruction.” Data offered is in a variety of sociological and political areas, including census enumerations; urban and community studies; conflict, violence, and wars; economic behavior; legal systems; legislative bodies; mass political behavior and attitudes; and organizational behavior. While much of the site emphasizes the late twentieth century, data sets such as “Historical and Contemporary Electoral Processes” and “1790–1960 Censuses” will be useful to studies of earlier periods. Includes five special topic archives with data in linked sites geared to health, education, aging, criminal justice, and substance abuse and mental health concerns. Also provides 45 links to related sites. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social and political history. The site plans in the future to introduce “a set of pages that focuses on the needs and interests of novice data users.”
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-22.

www.history
WTO History Project
University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Patrick F. Gillham.
Reviewed 2013-09-01.
Designed to provide access now and in the future to documents created by groups that protested the World Trade Organization’s “Ministerial Week,” held in Seattle from November 29-December 3, 1999. Offers texts of more than 80 oral histories of organizers and participants, 73 photographs, and images of 224 fliers, posters, and leaflets. Also includes 46 planning documents, 18 signs carried by protesters, two audio files, three videos, and a timeline documenting 520 events from March to December 1999. A second timeline covers the week of protests and a table with contact information for more than 1,400 organizations that opposed the meetings. Documents in the collection can be searched by keyword, organizations, and issues—labor, environment, trade, democracy, direct action, food, agriculture, health, and independent media. The site’s creators state they are “dedicated to ensuring that any account ever written of the WTO protests be attentive to the range of people who turned out, the varieties of strategies and issues they brought to the streets and the meeting rooms, and the coalitions that emerged and failed.” As a result, the site will be of great value to those studying social protest movements in the late 20th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2003-11-29.

www.history
RFK in the Land of Apartheid: A Ripple of Hope
Larry Shore, Hunter College, CUNY.
Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s trip to South Africa in June 1966 to protest that country’s system of apartheid and support efforts to combat it is amply documented on this site with texts, audio files, film clips, and photographs. The site provides texts of the five speeches delivered by Kennedy during the visit—for three of these, full audio files are provided. Also offers texts of 13 additional speeches—from South African students and political leaders, as well as American leaders—with six available in audio format. Background annotations of up to 100 words accompany all texts. A newspapers section on the press coverage of the visit provides nine articles from U.S. newspapers and 15 articles from South African newspapers. A magazines section provides seven articles about the visit, including a Look magazine article about the trip written by the senator; and a cartoon section highlights 12 political cartoons. The site also provides 13 related documents, and more sources can be found in the “Resources” section. These include the “Black Christ” painting that caused uproar in 1962, 11 posters of Nelson Mendela, 11 annotated political cartoons, two national anthems for comparison, and 19 recommended books and links to 19 relevant sites. An overview essay of 3,500 words describes the “enormous impact” of Kennedy’s visit and illuminates “the manner in which he subtly challenged and undermined some of the pillars of apartheid ideology and mythology.” A study materials section is designed for use in high schools and colleges with questions for class discussion and a feedback questionnaire. Additionally, the site’s audio and video streaming now works with Realplayer and Mediaplayer, and the video streaming also now works with with Quicktime. A valuable site for studying the history of race relations in South Africa and the United States.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2011-07-19.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
After the Day of Infamy: “Man on the Street” Interviews Following the Attack on Pearl Harbor
American Memory, Library of Congress.
The Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The following day, Alan Lomax, head of the Archive of American Folk Song, asked fieldworkers in the Library of Congress Radio Research Project to make documentary recordings in cities and towns around the United States. These fieldworkers collected “man-on-the-street” reactions to the bombing and the declaration of war by the United States. In January and February, 1942, fieldworkers collected a second set of recordings, asking people to address their views of the attack and declaration of war directly to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. This presentation consists of both sets of recordings, totaling approximately 12 hours, offering the thoughts and opinions of more than 200 Americans “after the day of infamy.” Related written documents created by fieldworkers, correspondence with archive staff, biographies of the fieldworkers, and dust jackets from the original disks are also included. The interviews are available in audio and text and are searchable by keyword, as well as by subject, state, or name of interviewee.
Resources Available: TEXT, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-27.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
National Security Archive
Thomas S. Blanton, Director.
See JAH web review by Chester Pach.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
Despite its official sounding name, this is a non-governmental institution. Founded in 1985 as a central repository for declassified materials obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests, the Archives at present offers approximately 100 “Briefing Books,” each providing government documents and a contextual narrative on national security history and issues, foreign policy initiatives, and military history. While much of the material relates to events abroad, documents provide information on U.S. involvement and perceptions. Major categories include Europe (with documents on the Hungarian Revolution, Solidarity, and the 1989 revolutions); Latin America (overall CIA involvement, war in Colombia, contras, Mexico); nuclear history (treaties, Berlin crisis, India and Pakistan, North Korea, China, Israel); Middle East and South Asia (Iraq and WMD, hostages in Iran, October 1973 war); the U.S. intelligence community; government secrecy; humanitarian interventions; and September 11 sourcebooks on the terrorist threat. A wealth of information on U.S. diplomatic and military history during and after the Cold War.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2003-11-27.

www.history
The World of 1898: The Spanish-American War
Hispanic Division, Library of Congress .
See JAH web review by Bonnie M. Miller.
Reviewed 2011-12-01.
This exhibit offers chronologies, images, bibliographies, short biographies, essays, and other textual material. An overview essay by David Trask places the materials in historical context. The presentation has four main sections—Cuba, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Spain—each with an introductory essay, a chronology of events in that country, and guides to related Library of Congress resources. “Cuba” offers a guide to maps of Cuba. “Philippines” offers maps, a selected bibliography of personal accounts, and a photo gallery of Philippine insurgents. “Puerto Rico” offers maps and a guide to prominent authors in the countries involved in the war. “Spain” features a bibliography of Spanish narratives from the war and a photo gallery of Spanish ships used in the war. An index offers short descriptive entries on 56 people; 13 places in Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Philippines; and 21 events and other miscellany. Also available are a chronology and a selected bibliography of personal narratives, illustration sources, manuscripts, and maps. Finally, there is a list of additional Library of Congress resources and relevant American Memory presentations.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-29.

www.history
James Madison Papers
Library of Congress, American Memory.
A valuable resource for researching or teaching about James Madison’s life, the Revolution, or the Early Republic, this website provides access to 12,000 items (72,000 digital images) related to the President.These include his father’s letters, Madison’s correspondence, personal notes, drafts of letters and legislation, and legal and financial documents. Material covers the period from 1723 to 1836. Page images of correspondence can be browsed by title, name, or correspondence series or they can be searched by keyword or phrase appearing in the bibliographic records (descriptive information) of the collection. Additionally, the full text of correspondence for which transcriptions (from published editions of Madison’s papers) are available can also be searched by keyword or phrase. The site provides a timeline covering the period 1751 to 1836 that is useful in placing the events of Madison’s life historical context. Three essays are available, including one on Madison’s life and papers and one on Madison at the Federal Constitutional Convention. This website is a valuable resource for researching or teaching about Madison’s life, the Revolution, or the Early Republic.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
The Kraus Collection of Sir Francis Drake
Library of Congress.
Sir Francis Drake, English explorer and naval strategist, made many voyages to the Americas in the late 16th century and circumnavigated the globe between 1577 and 1580. This collection of important primary and secondary materials about Drake’s voyages in the Americas offers 60 items in various languages, including manuscripts, books, maps, medals, and portraits. The collection was assembled by Hans Peter Kraus and his wife Hanni. The main presentation is Kraus’s pictorial biography of Drake. The essay also features an extensive seven-part introduction by scholars David W. Waters and Dr. Richard Boulind. Visitors can search by keyword or browse by author, title, or subject. The site offers a timeline of Drake’s voyages with links to documents. It also provides a presentation, “The Actors and Their Stage,” highlighting material on the key personages from Drake’s life, places from his voyages, and images of Drake’s ship Golden Hind and Armada battles. This archive is a useful resource for researching the 16th-century history of the Americas or the Age of Exploration.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
France in America
Library of Congress and Bibliotheque Nationale de France.
A bilingual website (English and French), “France in America” explores the history of the French presence in North America from the early sixteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century through more than 360 manuscripts, books, maps, and other documents. The site is centered on two major themes: “the role played by France in the exploration and settlement of the continent and its participation in several events which indelibly marked the history of the United States: the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and the Louisiana Purchase.” Offering five thematic presentations—“Exploration and Knowledge,” “The Colonies,” “Franco-Indian Alliances,” “Imperial Struggles,” and “The French and North America after the Treaty of Paris”—each with a title exhibit and seven or more additional exhibits that each highlight particular items in the collection, this web site presents primary sources that can be explored through these presentations or browsed in the collections section. A timeline (1515–1804) organizes events in French America by explorations, colonization and development, and conflicts and diplomacy, and places them in the context of events in France. Additionally, there are eight descriptive maps that show various Indian groups in contact with the French and the changes in political boundaries in North America from before 1763 to the era of the Louisiana Purchase. Simple keyword and advanced searches are available. Further additions to the site are planned.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The Dick Thornburgh Papers
Digital Research Library at the University of Pittsburgh .
Dick Thornburgh served as Governor of Pennsylvania from 1979 to 1987, and Attorney General from 1988 to 1991, under Ronald Reagan and George Bush. He also served as Undersecretary General of the United Nations from 1992 to 1993 after an unsuccessful bid to fill John Heinz’s vacated U.S. Senate in 1991. He is currently a practicing lawyer in Washington D.C. This website presents 5,115 documents from his personal papers, including executive orders, news releases, op-eds, reports, speeches, testimony, and transcripts. It also includes 488 photographs, 31 audio clips, and 55 video clips. These materials shed light on many prominent events in late-20th century U.S. political history and international relations. For example, a search for “Three Mile Island,” the nuclear power plant near Harrisburg that experienced a partial meltdown in 1979, calls up more than 300 items, including photographs of Thornburgh at the site and op-eds written by Thornburg designed to quell public fear.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2009-02-15.

www.history
U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817–1980
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This vast archive includes many documents and reports produced by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives and published between 1817 and 1980, for a total of more than 355,000 items. These items include 48,000 maps, 9,000 illustrations, thousands of reports, and numerous records of committee hearings and floor proceedings. All items are full-text searchable and can be browsed by subject, such as education, economics, food and agriculture, health, Indian affairs, armed forces and conflicts, environment and natural resources, and social issues. Within each of these broad categories, there are hundreds of subject headings, such as “animal welfare” (83 items), “alien labor” (306 items), and “ordnance testing” (353 items). The “Indian Affairs” category, for example, presents thousands of items on agencies and organizations relating to Indian affairs, Indian reservations, treaties, names of Indian tribes, as well as documents relating to hundreds of laws and supreme court cases. There is also a bill number search, an alphabetical list of names of all acts of Congress, and a listing of all documents by U.S. Congress session. All documents can be downloaded in .pdf format. In addition, a separate browse feature entitled “Serial Set Maps” facilitates access to thousands of maps from counties and cities across the country. Many of these date to the Civil War-era or later and include images of forts and depictions of field operations. Readex plans to expand coverage through 1994.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-08-19.

www.history
American Experience: Jimmy Carter
PBS.
This well-designed website, companion to the PBS documentary, offers a wide variety of secondary material on the Carter presidency. “People and Places” offers short profiles of Carter, his wife Rosalynn, his brother Billy, Carter’s White House staff (collectively known as “The Georgia Mafia”), Speaker of the House Thomas P. “Tip” O’Neill, and Vice-President Walter Mondale. It also offers short essays on key events of Carter’s presidency, including the election of 1976, the Egyptian-Israeli peace talks at Camp David, the Iranian hostage crisis, Carter’s July 1979 “Crisis of Confidence” speech, and the election of 1980. Many of the essays link to special features, such as the extensive media coverage of the Iranian hostage crisis and the text of the “Crisis of Confidence” speech. “Teacher’s Guide” offers nine suggestions for classroom learning activities in four categories: economics, civics, history, and geography. The site also includes a detailed chronology of Carter’s life and a small photo gallery with 16 images. This site provides a useful overview of Carter’s life and the political and diplomatic history of his presidency.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2006-02-08.

www.history
American History 102: Civil War to the Present
Stanley K. Schultz, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
This site reflects efforts to teach an American history survey course entirely through technology. Offers student lecture notes; 32 biographical sketches of prominent figures treated in the course, searchable by occupation, name, and era; bibliographic information; exams and review sheets; and a gallery of more than 200 photographs, many of which are taken from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The overall presentation is somewhat fragmented, but the site is rich in resources. Perhaps most valuable is a directory of history websites, organized by subject and time period. Professor Stanley Schultz and his associates have designed the site as a supplement for his videotaped lectures on the post-Civil War period.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Words and Deeds in American History: Selected Documents Celebrating the Manuscript Division’s First 100 Years
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site displays approximately 90 primary documents from the 15th century to the mid 20th century. Features eight subjects: the presidency; Congress, law, and politics; military affairs; diplomacy and foreign policy; arts and literature; science, medicine, exploration, and invention; African-American history and culture; and women’s history. The collection emphasizes “prominent Americans whose lives reflect our country’s evolution,” including 23 presidents and figures such as Carter Woodson, Thurgood Marshall, pioneer physician Elizabeth Blackwell, Wilbur Wright, and Alexander Graham Bell. Each subject is accompanied by a useful 100- to 400-word background essay and a link to the document’s host collection. Also includes a 2,000-word essay entitled “Collecting, Preserving, and Researching History: A Peek into the Library of Congress Manuscript Division.” Although limited in size, this site provides an eclectic group of documents of national interest.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The Digital Classroom
National Archives and Records Administration.
See JAH web review by David Kobrin.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
A series of activities, primary documents, lesson plans, links, and worksheets designed to encourage “teachers of students at all levels to use archival documents in the classroom.” Includes tasks to help students understand how to use National Archives materials; 20 thematically-oriented teaching activities covering the period from the Constitutional Convention to Watergate; detailed information about National History Day, an annual educational program and competition; and 35 lessons and activities organized around constitutional issues ranging from well-known patent cases to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the establishment of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Many of the activities correlate to specific sections of the National History Standards and the National Standards for Civics and Government. Also contains a handful of links and material about books, workshops, and summer institutes for teachers. A well-organized introduction to the practice of historical research.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
World War I Document Archive
Jane Plotke, Richard Hacken, Alan Albright, and Michael Shackelford.
See JAH web review by Christopher Capozzola.
Reviewed 2004-07-01.
Hundreds of documents and thousands of images relating to World War I, with particular emphasis on military, diplomatic, and political dimensions. Documents are arranged both chronologically and by type, including governmental documents, personal reminiscences, the war at sea, and medical aspects. An “image archive” currently contains two viewable sections—a photo archive of 1,844 images in 15 categories, including individuals, locations, heads of state, commanders, refugees, war albums, and animals; and “Medals of the Great War,” that provides photographs and 100-word descriptions. Last updated in July 2001, the image archive promises to include images of flags, maps, artworks, and ephemera in the future. The site also offers full-text reproductions of more than 50 contemporary and recent books, some of which cover participation in the war effort of African Americans, American Indians, and women; a biographical dictionary of 500–700 word entries for more than 200 names; a bibliographical essay covering more than 100 titles; and approximately 125 links to related sites. The authors—volunteers from a World War I electronic discussion network—encourage user participation in expanding the site, a valuable source for those studying military and diplomatic aspects of the war. Listen to the audio review:
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
Hiroshima Archive
Mayu Tsuruya, Lewis and Clark College.
Designed originally “to join the online effort made by many people all over the world to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing” of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, this site is composed of two sections. A three-part photo gallery presents 60 images from the work of the esteemed Japanese photographer Hiromi Tsuchida of surviving trees, buildings, and bridges; of survivors, whose words describing their experiences the day of the bombing are included; and of surviving objects currently in the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum collection with accompanying descriptions. Many of the more than 100 links to additional resources are no longer operational, but the site will be valuable to those interested in practices of historical memory in the atomic age.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2001-07-12.