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There are 218 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War
Edward L. Ayers, Anne S. Rubin, William G. Thomas, University of Virginia.
See JAH web review by Michael Barton.
Reviewed 2012-09-01.
Conceived by Edward Ayers, Hugh P. Kelley Professor of History at the University of Virginia, this site is a massive, searchable archive relating to two Shenandoah Valley counties during the Civil War period—Augusta County, Virginia and Franklin County, Pennsylvania—divided by 200 miles and the institution of slavery. Thousands of pages of maps, images, letters, diaries, and newspapers, in addition to church, agricultural, military, and public records—census, tax, Freedmen�s Bureau, and veterans�-provide data, experiences, and perspectives from the eve of the war until its aftermath. Offers both a narrative “walking tour” and direct access to the archive. Also presents bibliographies, a “fact book,” student essays and projects, and other materials intended to foster primary-source research. “Students can explore every dimension of the conflict and write their own histories, reconstructing the life stories of women, African Americans, farmers, politicians, soldiers, and families.” Includes a section titled �Memory of the War� that presents postwar writings on battles, soldier and camp life, reunions, obituaries and tributes, and politics. Also includes material omitted from Ayres’s recent book about the communities, In the Presence of Mine Enemies, along with digitized texts of cited materials. This is an important and innovative site, particularly valuable to historians of 19th-century American life.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-18.

www.history
George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741–1799
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Susan Holbrook Perdue.
Reviewed 2008-06-01.
This collection of approximately 65,000 documents written by or to George Washington is the largest collection of original Washington documents in the world. It includes “correspondence, letterbooks, commonplace books, diaries, journals, financial account books, military records, reports, and notes accumulated by Washington from 1741 through 1799.” The site is searchable by keyword, and the range of documents make it an extremely rich source. Unfortunately, many of the documents are available only as page images—often with difficult to decipher handwriting—rather than as transcribed text. Transcripts, however, do exist for all of the diary pages and for additional selected documents. The site includes a number of helpful features: a timeline with annotations to relevant documents; a 1,500-word essay on Washington’s letterbooks; an essay entitled “Creating the American Nation,” with annotations on eight selected documents spanning Washington’s lifetime; a 8,500-word essay on his diaries; an 11,500-word essay on the publication history of Washington’s papers; and a 4,500-word essay on Washington’s career as a surveyor and mapmaker. “Because of the wide range of Washington’s interests, activities, and correspondents, which include ordinary citizens as well as celebrated figures, his papers are a rich source for almost every aspect of colonial and early American history.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
Selected Civil War Photographs
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This collection offers 1,118 photographs depicting Civil War military personnel, preparations for battle, and the aftermath of battles in the main eastern theater and in the west, in addition to Federal Navy and Atlantic seaborne expeditions against the Confederacy. The site also includes portraits of Confederate and Union officers and enlisted men and photographs of Washington, D.C., during the war. Most images were created under the supervision of photographer Mathew B. Brady; additional photographs were made by Alexander Gardner after leaving Brady’s employment to start his own business. The presentation “Time Line of the Civil War” places images in historical context. “Does the Camera Ever Lie” demonstrates the constructed nature of images, showing that photographers sometimes rearranged elements of their images to achieve a more controlled effect. This site is useful for those studying 19th-century American photography and Civil War history.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-25.

www.history
Spanish-American War in Motion Pictures
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Bonnie M. Miller.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This site features 68 motion pictures of the Spanish-American War and the Philippine Revolution produced by the Edison Manufacturing Company and the American Mutoscope & Biograph Company between 1898 and 1901. These films include footage of troops, ships, notable figures, and parades shot in the U.S., Cuba, and the Philippines, in addition to reenactments of battles and related events. A Special Presentation puts the motion pictures in chronological order; brief essays provide a historical context for their filming. This site is indexed by subject and searchable by keyword, and includes a link to resources and documents pertaining to the war in the Library’s Hispanic Division.
Resources Available: TEXT, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
CWIHP: Cold War International History Project
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
See JAH web review by Mark Atwood Lawrence.
Reviewed 2013-12-01.
Much scholarship on the Cold War has been written by Westerners with little access to sources in Soviet archives. This extensive collection seeks to remedy the holes in Cold War historiography by actively collecting sources from the former Communist bloc. Thousands of documents in the diplomatic history of the Cold War are currently available, stretching in time from the 1945–46 Soviet occupation of northern Iran through the late 1990s. These sources, all carefully annotated, are divided both into collections and by geographic region. The 50 document collections cover a wide range of topics, including both specific events (1954 Geneva Conference on Indochina, 1956 Hungarian Revolution, 1980–81 Polish Crisis) and broader topics stretching over longer periods of time (Economic Cold War, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, The Cold War in Africa). The collections vary widely in size, between three and several hundred documents, and include primarily official documents and communicationmeeting minutes, memoranda, transcribed conversations between leaders, reports, and several personal letters and diary entries.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-10-28.

www.history
South Texas Border, 1900–1920: Photographs from the Robert Runyon Collection
American Memory, Library of Congress and University of Texas, Austin.
See JAH web review by Neil Foley.
Reviewed 2003-03-01.
A collection featuring the life’s work of commercial photographer Robert Runyon (1881–1968), totalling more than 8,000 images, that document the history and development of South Texas and the border, including the U.S. military presence in the area prior to and during World War I and the growth and development of the Rio Grande Valley in the early 1900s. A special section presents nine of Runyon’s 350 photographs of the Mexican Revolution (1910–20) in Matamoros, Monterrey, Ciudad Victoria, and the Texas border area from 1913 through 1916. Includes a 900-word essay on the Revolution and a 1,100-word biographical essay on Runyon. An Ameritech Award Winner. Of use to those studying the history of documentary photography, images of the Mexican Revolution, and Texas history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
SCETI: Schoenberg Center for Electronic Text and Image
University of Pennsylvania Special Collections Library.
These eclectic special collection materials span the 17th to the 20th centuries. Visitors can search material from nine collections and visit 14 exhibitions. The collection “A Crisis of the Union” on the Civil War presents 224 pamphlets, broadsides, clippings, paintings, and maps to address the “causes, conduct, and consequences” of the war. A collection devoted to Theodore Dreiser presents correspondence, variant editions of the novel Sister Carrie, an early manuscript for Jennie Gerhardt, and scholarly essays. A collection of approximately 4,000 photographs from singer Marian Anderson’s papers is complemented by an exhibit that includes more than 40 audio and video recordings. A collection on the history of chemistry emphasizes the pre-1850 period with monographs on chemistry and alchemy, and more than 3,000 prints and photographs of scientists, laboratories, and apparatus. The Robert and Molly Freedman archive of Jewish Music recordings includes 26,000 catalog entries in English, Yiddish, and Hebrew and six sample recordings. Exhibits celebrate the work of Eugene Ormandy and Leopold Stokowski. Women’s history is represented by the diaries of five American and one English woman written between 1850 and 1909. Diaries range from one to 30 years and are both indexed by date and available for reading as text. An exhibit titled “Household Words” presents writing by women about food from the 15th to the 20th century. An exhibit on the colonization of the Americas as it appeared in print presents illustrations, maps, and manuscripts from the age of exploration. The site also includes an exhibit on the development of the ENIAC computer and a selection of 49 works from the University of Pennsylvania’s art museum. he English Renaissance in Context (ERIC) provides tutorials and a database of texts to help students analyze Shakespearean works and plays.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum.
See JAH web review by Gregory Wilson.
Reviewed 2002-06-02.
The heart of this collection of material about Lyndon Baines Johnson is the group of 64 oral history interviews selected from a collection of more than 1,000. Oral histories, from 35 to 200 pages, include interviews with Dean Rusk, Johnson’s secretary, Bess Abell, Robert MacNamara, Thurgood Marshall, and Billy Graham. Of the 2,600 recorded telephone conversations in the Johnson archives, the site provides transcribed samples of conversations with five people, including Adam Clayton Powell and Jacqueline Kennedy. The site also links to a C-SPAN collection of more than 800 transcribed recorded excerpts and full conversations Johnson had while in office. A selection of 20 speeches and nine messages to Congress are available in transcription and address issues such as the Great Society and limitations on the war in Vietnam. Also provided is an advertisement from the 1964 presidential campaign. A selection of 50 facsimile entries from Johnson’s office diary, kept by his secretaries, includes meals as well as events of his first day in office, his reaction to incidents in the Gulf of Tonkin, a meeting with George Wallace about sending federal troops to Selma, and Johnson’s announcement that he would not seek re-election. Diary entries range from three to 20 pages. Visitors may listen to two audio files of less than a minute each in which Johnson is sworn in following Kennedy’s assassination and comments on events. Facsimiles of 98 National Security Action memoranda discuss policies towards Vietnam, nuclear weapons, and Latin America, among other issues. A collection of 37 photographs depict Johnson in meetings with other important figures of the time, including Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. Biographical information about Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson is provided in two chronologies. In addition, an exhibit from the Johnson museum provides a 6,200-word essay about events in Johnson’s lifetime. This site will be very useful for research about Johnson’s presidency and major events of the 1960s.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
Digital Library of Georgia
University of Georgia Libraries.
Provides an enormous amount of material digitized from collections housed in libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions in the state of Georgia. Legal materials include more than 17,000 public state government documents from 1994 to the present, updated daily, and a complete set of Acts and Resolutions from 1799 to 1995. A set of “Southeastern Native American Documents” provides approximately 2,000 letters, legal documents, military orders, financial papers, and archeological images covering the period 1730–1842. Materials from the Civil War-era include a soldier’s diary and two collections of letters, one from the wife of an Atlanta lawyer and plantation owner. The site provides a collection of 80 full-text, word-searchable versions of books from the early nineteenth century to the 1920s and three historic newspapers. The site also includes approximately 2,500 political cartoons by Clifford H. “Baldy” Baldowski, from 1946–1982; copies from a first-hand account of a violent incident of civil unrest during a political rally in 1868; Jimmy Carter’s diaries of 1971–75 and 1977–81; annual reports of the mayor of Savannah, 1865–1917; photographs of African Americans from around Augusta in the late 19th century; and 1,500 architectural and landscape photographs from the 1940s to the 1980s. A valuable collection for students of southern life, politics, law, and culture.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a Learning Resources section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
After the Day of Infamy: “Man on the Street” Interviews Following the Attack on Pearl Harbor
American Memory, Library of Congress.
The Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The following day, Alan Lomax, head of the Archive of American Folk Song, asked fieldworkers in the Library of Congress Radio Research Project to make documentary recordings in cities and towns around the United States. These fieldworkers collected “man-on-the-street” reactions to the bombing and the declaration of war by the United States. In January and February, 1942, fieldworkers collected a second set of recordings, asking people to address their views of the attack and declaration of war directly to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. This presentation consists of both sets of recordings, totaling approximately 12 hours, offering the thoughts and opinions of more than 200 Americans after the day of infamy. Related written documents created by fieldworkers, correspondence with archive staff, biographies of the fieldworkers, and dust jackets from the original disks are also included. The interviews are available in audio and text and are searchable by keyword, as well as by subject, state, or name of interviewee.
Resources Available: TEXT, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-27.

www.history
American Shores: Maps of the Middle Atlantic Region to 1850
New York Public Library.
This attractive site explores the mid-Atlantic region and history with maps created before 1850. An extensive collection offers more than 1,852 historical maps of many different types. In addition to numerous regional and state maps, these include land surveys, coast surveys, nautical charts, military maps, ornamental maps, and city maps. An overview provides historical context for reading the maps of the geographic regions. In addition, the site offers several special features. “Basics of Maps” explains such cartographic terms and features as orientation, scale, and the cartouche. “Maps Through History” highlights particular maps and map genres from the collection, including a look at New York Harbor, the Hudson River, nautical charts, maps revealing early transportation routes, and maps of American Revolution battle sites. “Geographical Areas” highlights many kinds of maps and what information they offer. Visitors can click on thumbnail images to view enlarged maps and pan and zoom the maps. The collection is searchable by keyword and combinations of keywords. An outstanding resource for those studying the political and social history of the U.S. to 1850.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institutes public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
National Security Archive
Thomas S. Blanton, Director.
See JAH web review by Chester Pach.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
Despite its official sounding name, this is a non-governmental institution. Founded in 1985 as a central repository for declassified materials obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests, the Archives at present offers approximately 100 “Briefing Books,” each providing government documents and a contextual narrative on national security history and issues, foreign policy initiatives, and military history. While much of the material relates to events abroad, documents provide information on U.S. involvement and perceptions. Major categories include Europe (with documents on the Hungarian Revolution, Solidarity, and the 1989 revolutions); Latin America (overall CIA involvement, war in Colombia, contras, Mexico); nuclear history (treaties, Berlin crisis, India and Pakistan, North Korea, China, Israel); Middle East and South Asia (Iraq and WMD, hostages in Iran, October 1973 war); the U.S. intelligence community; government secrecy; humanitarian interventions; and September 11 sourcebooks on the terrorist threat. A wealth of information on U.S. diplomatic and military history during and after the Cold War.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2003-11-27.

www.history
Territorial Kansas Online
Kansas State Historical Society and University of Kansas.
See JAH web review by Michael D. Pierson.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
This repository of Territorial Kansas collections convey the growing divisions in Kansas and the nation over the expansion of slavery, federalism, nationalism, industrialization of the North, and changing political coalitions in Congress. Users have access to government documents, diaries, letters, photographs, maps, newspapers, rare secondary sources, historical artifacts, and images of historic sites where some of the territorial confrontations occurred. Divided into five sections (Territorial Politics and Government, Border Warfare, Immigration and Early Settlement, Personalities, and National Debate about Kansas) each is searchable by keyword, author, and county. The topical sections are subdivided into relevant themes and include an introductory essay (between 1,000 and 2,000 words). Visitors will find essays on territorial politics, the rights of women and African Americans, military organizations, and free state and pro-slavery organizations. The Personalities section list 31 individuals, including John Brown and John Calhoun, and the final section presents both anti-slavery and pro-slavery perspectives of the national debate about Kansas. The site also includes a timeline with links and an annotated bibliography. An ongoing project, lesson plans are currently being added.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-01.

www.history
Raid on Deerfield: The Many Stories of 1704
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association (PVMA) and Memorial Hall Museum.
See JAH web review by Richard Rabinowitz.
Reviewed 2005-09-01.
This outstanding site documents the 1704 raid on Deerfield, Massachusetts, by 300 French and their Native American allies. During the raid, 112 Deerfield men, women, and children were captured and forced to march 300 miles to Canada during winter. Eventually, about two-thirds of the captives were released and returned to Deerfield, while one-third remained with their captors. Visitors are introduced to the raid by an impressive multimedia exhibit, describing the white settlement patterns that led to profound cross-cultural tensions. Backgrounds includes fifteen short (500- to 1000-word) essays that give historical background and context on the colonization of New England, as well as the various tensions between white settlers and Native Americans. Voices and Songs provides a 5-part audio commentary for the 300th anniversary of the raid, 3 audio versions of Native American creation stories, 5 seventeenth century popular songs, eight selections of 17th- and 18th- century French music, and excerpts from the opera The Captivation of Eunice Williams. 5 Cultures includes brief introductions to each of the five cultural groups involved: English, French, Mohawk, Huron, and Wobanaki. The 5 cultures are also represented in the 28 individual biographies historians and archaeologists have been able to reconstruct, including Native Americans, French, and English settlers. Maps includes a dozen maps, including Native American territories and interactive maps of the raid and the march to Canada. After viewing and reading the evidence, visitors are asked to decide whether the raid was part of a larger pattern of cross-cultural violence or an aberration.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-29.

www.history
The World of 1898: The Spanish-American War
Hispanic Division, Library of Congress .
See JAH web review by Bonnie M. Miller.
Reviewed 2011-12-01.
This exhibit offers chronologies, images, bibliographies, short biographies, essays, and other textual material. An overview essay by David Trask places the materials in historical context. The presentation has four main sections—Cuba, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Spain—each with an introductory essay, a chronology of events in that country, and guides to related Library of Congress resources. “Cuba” offers a guide to maps of Cuba. “Philippines” offers maps, a selected bibliography of personal accounts, and a photo gallery of Philippine insurgents. “Puerto Rico” offers maps and a guide to prominent authors in the countries involved in the war. “Spain” features a bibliography of Spanish narratives from the war and a photo gallery of Spanish ships used in the war. An index offers short descriptive entries on 56 people; 13 places in Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Philippines; and 21 events and other miscellany. Also available are a chronology and a selected bibliography of personal narratives, illustration sources, manuscripts, and maps. Finally, there is a list of additional Library of Congress resources and relevant American Memory presentations.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-29.

www.history
The Kraus Collection of Sir Francis Drake
Library of Congress.
Sir Francis Drake, English explorer and naval strategist, made many voyages to the Americas in the late 16th century and circumnavigated the globe between 1577 and 1580. This collection of important primary and secondary materials about Drake’s voyages in the Americas offers 60 items in various languages, including manuscripts, books, maps, medals, and portraits. The collection was assembled by Hans Peter Kraus and his wife Hanni. The main presentation is Kraus’s pictorial biography of Drake. The essay also features an extensive seven-part introduction by scholars David W. Waters and Dr. Richard Boulind. Visitors can search by keyword or browse by author, title, or subject. The site offers a timeline of Drake’s voyages with links to documents. It also provides a presentation, “The Actors and Their Stage,” highlighting material on the key personages from Drake’s life, places from his voyages, and images of Drake’s ship Golden Hind and Armada battles. This archive is a useful resource for researching the 16th-century history of the Americas or the Age of Exploration.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Bound for Glory: America in Color, 1939–1943
Library of Congress.
This exhibition offers 70 color pictures taken by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information (FSA/OWI) between 1939 and 1943. This collection “reveals a surprisingly vibrant world that has typically been viewed only through black-and-white images. These vivid scenes and portraits capture the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations, the nation’s subsequent economic recovery and industrial growth, and the country’s great mobilization for World War II.” The collection features the work of famed photographers John Vachon, Jack Delano, Russell Lee, and Marion Post Wolcott. All pictures in the exhibition can be viewed in large format by clicking on the image or the title in the exhibition gallery. The collection is searchable by keyword. The complete collection of FSA/OWI photographs—171,000 black-and-white images and 1,602 color images—is available on the Library of Congress website at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/fsowhome.html. This collection is of interest to both those studying the history of American photography and those seeking images of New Deal-era America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2005-11-30.

www.history
France in America
Library of Congress and Bibliotheque Nationale de France.
A bilingual website (English and French), “France in America” explores the history of the French presence in North America from the early sixteenth century to the end of the nineteenth century through more than 360 manuscripts, books, maps, and other documents. The site is centered on two major themes: “the role played by France in the exploration and settlement of the continent and its participation in several events which indelibly marked the history of the United States: the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and the Louisiana Purchase.” Offering five thematic presentations—“Exploration and Knowledge,” “The Colonies,” “Franco-Indian Alliances,” “Imperial Struggles,” and “The French and North America after the Treaty of Paris”—each with a title exhibit and seven or more additional exhibits that each highlight particular items in the collection, this web site presents primary sources that can be explored through these presentations or browsed in the collections section. A timeline (1515–1804) organizes events in French America by explorations, colonization and development, and conflicts and diplomacy, and places them in the context of events in France. Additionally, there are eight descriptive maps that show various Indian groups in contact with the French and the changes in political boundaries in North America from before 1763 to the era of the Louisiana Purchase. Simple keyword and advanced searches are available. Further additions to the site are planned.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Northwestern European Military Situation Maps from World War II
Library of Congress, American Memory.
A well-designed site is an extremely useful resource for anyone studying the military history of World War II, this collection consists of 416 printed maps from World War II, showing the daily positions of allied army units during the campaigns in Western Europe beginning with the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944, and continuing through July 26, 1945. Also included are 115 reports from the campaigns. Visitors can search the collection or browse the maps and reports by title, creator, subject, place, or date. The site also includes an interactive essay on the Battle of the Bulge. Visitors can select the desired zoom level and window size for viewing maps from the options list below map images, as well as move the view up, down, left, or right within a zoom level. The map images offer excellent detail.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-07.

www.history
The Lincoln Institute
The Lincoln Institute.
This extensive website offers five projects on Abraham Lincoln’s life and political career along with teacher and student resources. Each section offers essays on the persons discussed. “Mr. Lincoln’s White House” explores the people and events related to the White House in Mr. Lincoln’s time, including a look at nearby areas of the city, and a section on visitors’ impressions of Lincoln. “Mr. Lincoln and the Founders” includes an essay on Lincoln and the Declaration of Independence, a background essay, observations by Lincoln scholars, and a bibliography. “Mr. Lincoln and Freedom,” explores Lincoln and the issue of slavery. Additional topics include “Mr. Lincoln and Friends” and “Mr. Lincoln and New York.” The “Teacher Assistance” page includes links to 13 lesson plans. The site also offers a link to “Abraham Lincoln’s Classroom” with resources for students and teachers, including quizzes, quotes, featured commentary, and links to maps. This site is an outstanding resource for material on teaching about Lincoln and the events of his presidency, as well as an excellent starting point for research on the Lincoln presidency and the politics and people of the Civil War era.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817–1980
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This vast archive includes many documents and reports produced by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives and published between 1817 and 1980, for a total of more than 355,000 items. These items include 48,000 maps, 9,000 illustrations, thousands of reports, and numerous records of committee hearings and floor proceedings. All items are full-text searchable and can be browsed by subject, such as education, economics, food and agriculture, health, Indian affairs, armed forces and conflicts, environment and natural resources, and social issues. Within each of these broad categories, there are hundreds of subject headings, such as animal welfare (83 items), alien labor (306 items), and ordnance testing (353 items). The Indian Affairs category, for example, presents thousands of items on agencies and organizations relating to Indian affairs, Indian reservations, treaties, names of Indian tribes, as well as documents relating to hundreds of laws and supreme court cases. There is also a bill number search, an alphabetical list of names of all acts of Congress, and a listing of all documents by U.S. Congress session. All documents can be downloaded in .pdf format. In addition, a separate browse feature entitled “Serial Set Maps” facilitates access to thousands of maps from counties and cities across the country. Many of these date to the Civil War-era or later and include images of forts and depictions of field operations. Readex plans to expand coverage through 1994.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-08-19.

www.history
Duke Digital Collections
Digital Scriptorium, Duke University.
Embracing twelve digitized collections, five exhibits, and six student projects, this website contains primary documents. Collections include two websites related to advertising — Emergence of Advertising in America, 1850�1920 [147] and Ad*Access [180] — in addition to a collection of health-related ads from 1911 to 1958 in Medicine and Madison Avenue [160]. George Percival Scriven: An American in Bohol, The Philippines, 1899�1901 presents a first-hand account by a U.S. officer of life during the occupation. Civil War Women offers correspondence and a diary relating to three American women of diverse backgrounds. African American Women presents letters by three slaves and a memoir by the daughter of slaves. The Emma Spaulding Bryant Letters presents ten revealing letters written in 1873 by Mrs. Bryant to her husband concerning medical and private matters. Historic American Sheet Music includes more than 3,000 pieces published between 1850 and 1920. Documents from the Women’s Liberation Movement offers more than forty documents from 1969 to 1974. William Gedney Photographs and Writings provides close to 5,000 prints, work prints, and contact sheets from the 1950s to the 1980s. Urban Landscapes present more than 1,000 images depicting urban areas.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-10.

www.history
The American Image: The Photographs of John Collier Jr.
Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico.
In 1941, the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information (FSA/OWI) hired photographer John Collier Jr. to document ordinary life in America, focusing on civil defense and public morale. This website presents more than 300 of the photographs Collier took for this two-year assignment. These photographs span the country from New Mexico to Maine, and portray farm work, family life, industrial works, military recruitment and training, cityscapes, mining and other labor, religious and leisure activities, schooling, as well as Native American communities. To complement these photographs, the website also includes several interactive activities. Active Looking is a guided examination of photographs that pushes users to think about the authorship, composition, and purpose of photographs. In The Shooting Script, users compare one of Colliers photographs to a contemporary photograph with a similar subject, learning about the importance of historical context and the photographers process. Propaganda Filmmaker allows users to make their own short film using Colliers photographs as well as posters and video clips from other websites. A teachers guide for all activities is also available.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-10.

www.history
Alabama Maps
Department of Geography, University of Alabama.
This site contains more than 3,500 scanned and digitized maps divided into two indexes—historical and contemporary. The historical maps index contains several sections. The most voluminous section, “Alabama,” is divided into time periods, geological features, Alabama counties, rivers, and state highways. Another section indexes 13 other southeastern states, including Texas, the Carolinas, and Florida. There are also maps of the Western Hemisphere, North America, Mexico, and the Caribbean, some dating before 1700. An especially valuable feature of the historical index is the “Special Topics” which contains maps of the Civil War, including the battles in Gettysburg and Antietam, railroad routes, and ten Native American maps, mostly illustrating the boundaries of Cherokee territories. The contemporary map index is divided into eighteen themes, including education, housing, politics, federal expenditures, climate, and recreation. There are more than 100 world maps of Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the South Pacific. Users will also find links to the University of Alabama’s Department of Geography and the publications of the Cartographic Laboratory. Created for educators and the business community, this is valuable resource for those researching the history of Alabama or contemporary themes in Alabama, the United States, and the world.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
American Civil War
Jim Janke, Dakota State University.
A gateway to more than 300 links about the American Civil War. Organized thematically, it offers links to a wide range of primary material—art, poetry, letters, and photographs—and also includes secondary sources such as bibliographies, museums, institutions, magazines, and other gateways. The site, indexed by subject, can help locate a wide variety of Civil War material, ranging from Confederate stamps to information about major battles, re-enactor groups, and the role of African-American troops in the war.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.