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There are 346 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
New Deal Network
Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute and Institute for Learning Technologies, Teachers College, Columbia University.
See JAH web review by Charles Forcey.
Reviewed 2002-03-01.
A database of more than 20,000 items relating to the New Deal. A “Document Library” contains more than 900 newspaper and journal articles, speeches, letters, reports, advertisements, and other textual materials, treating a broad array of subjects relevant to the period’s social, cultural, political, and economic history, while placing special emphasis on New Deal relief agencies and issues relating to labor, education, agriculture, the Supreme Court, and African Americans. The “Photo Gallery” of more than 5,000 images is organized into five units—“Culture,” “Construction,” “Social Programs,” “Federal Agencies,” and miscellaneous, including photos from 11 exhibitions and five series of photoessays, and images of disaster relief and public figures. The site additionally offers featured exhibits, many with lesson plan suggestions. Presently, the features section includes “The Magpie Sings the Depression,” a collection of 193 poems, articles, and short stories, and 275 graphics from a Bronx high school journal published between 1929 and 1941 with juvenile works by novelist James Baldwin, photographer Richard Avedon, cultural critic Robert Warshow, and film critic Stanley Kauffmann; “Dear Mrs Roosevelt” with selected letters written by young people to the first lady; “Student Activism in the 1930s,” which contains 38 photographs, graphics, and editorial cartoons, 12 American Student Union memoirs, 40 autobiographical essays, and a 20,000-word essay by Robert Cohen on 1930s campus radicalism; 17 selected interviews from American slave narratives gathered by the Works Progress Administration; and an illustrated essay on the history and social effects of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Includes approximately 100 annotated links to related sites. Of great value for teachers, students, and researchers interested in the social history of the New Deal era.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-18.

www.history
George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress, 1741–1799
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Susan Holbrook Perdue.
Reviewed 2008-06-01.
This collection of approximately 65,000 documents written by or to George Washington is the largest collection of original Washington documents in the world. It includes “correspondence, letterbooks, commonplace books, diaries, journals, financial account books, military records, reports, and notes accumulated by Washington from 1741 through 1799.” The site is searchable by keyword, and the range of documents make it an extremely rich source. Unfortunately, many of the documents are available only as page images—often with difficult to decipher handwriting—rather than as transcribed text. Transcripts, however, do exist for all of the diary pages and for additional selected documents. The site includes a number of helpful features: a timeline with annotations to relevant documents; a 1,500-word essay on Washington’s letterbooks; an essay entitled “Creating the American Nation,” with annotations on eight selected documents spanning Washington’s lifetime; a 8,500-word essay on his diaries; an 11,500-word essay on the publication history of Washington’s papers; and a 4,500-word essay on Washington’s career as a surveyor and mapmaker. “Because of the wide range of Washington’s interests, activities, and correspondents, which include ordinary citizens as well as celebrated figures, his papers are a rich source for almost every aspect of colonial and early American history.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
Remembering Jim Crow
American RadioWorks.
See JAH web review by Joseph Crespino.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
A companion site to the NPR radio documentary on segregated life in the South (broadcast in February 2002). Presents 30 audio excerpts, ranging from one minute to ten minutes in length, and approximately 130 photographs, arranged in six thematically-organized sections. Covers legal, social, and cultural aspects of segregation, black community life, and black resistance to the Jim Crow way of life. As anthropologist Kate Ellis, one of the site’s creators, notes, the interviews display a “marked contrast between African American and white reflections on Jim Crow.” Many of the photographs come from personal collections of the people interviewed. The site also includes 16 photographs taken by Farm Security Administration photographer Russell Lee in New Iberia, Louisiana. The site provides audio files and transcripts of the original radio documentary, more than 90 additional stories, a sampling of state segregation laws arranged by topic, links to 9 related sites, and a 41-title bibliography. The project creators—Ellis and personnel from American RadioWorks, the Minnesota Public Radio documentary producers—used interviews selected from more than 1,000 oral histories compiled by Duke University’s “Behind the Veil” project, in addition to conducting new interviews. The short 100-word introductions to each section succinctly provide a contextual framework to the documentary material. Valuable for those studying the American South, race relations, and African American history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Studs Terkel: Conversations with America
Chicago Historical Society .
See JAH web review by Clifford M. Kuhn.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
Part of the digital repository, Historical Voices, this site was created in honor of Studs Terkel, the noted oral historian, radio host of “The Studs Terkel Program,” and Pulitzer Prize-winning author. Dedicated to making Terkel’s 50 years of work available, it presents material pulled from approximately 5,000 hours of sound recordings. The seven galleries—The Studs Terkel Program; Division Street: America; Hard Times; The Good War; Race; Talking to Myself; and Greatest Hits—center on the extensive interviews Terkel completed for the radio show and his books and contain more than 400 audio clips of interviews. Most of the interviews are about 15 minutes in length and explore diverse subjects, including Chicago architecture, urban landscape, immigrants, street life, the 1929 stock market crash, organized labor, New Deal programs, race relations, and integration. Interviewees include Chicago architect Frank Lloyd Wright and labor activist Cesar Chavez as well as men and women on a train to Washington D.C. for the 1963 Civil Rights March. Sound recordings are searchable by date, keyword, or author. Complementing this site is an educational section intended to help students and teachers use oral history in the classroom and a 55-minute interview with Terkel. This well-designed site offers a rich history of many influential, as well as lesser-known, personalities living in the second half of the 20th century and is beneficial to anyone interested in the Great Depression, World War II, race relations, and labor issues.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-24.

www.history
Selected Civil War Photographs
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This collection offers 1,118 photographs depicting Civil War military personnel, preparations for battle, and the aftermath of battles in the main eastern theater and in the west, in addition to Federal Navy and Atlantic seaborne expeditions against the Confederacy. The site also includes portraits of Confederate and Union officers and enlisted men and photographs of Washington, D.C., during the war. Most images were created under the supervision of photographer Mathew B. Brady; additional photographs were made by Alexander Gardner after leaving Brady’s employment to start his own business. The presentation “Time Line of the Civil War” places images in historical context. “Does the Camera Ever Lie” demonstrates the constructed nature of images, showing that photographers sometimes rearranged elements of their images to achieve a more controlled effect. This site is useful for those studying 19th-century American photography and Civil War history.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-25.

www.history
Center for History and New Media
Center for History and New Media, George Mason University .
In the past decade new media and new technologies have begun to transform even the ancient discipline of history. CD-ROMs and the World Wide Web challenge historians to rethink the ways that they research, write, present, and teach about the past. The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) was established in the fall of 1994 to contribute to and reflect upon this transformation and challenge. The Center produces historical works in new media, tests the effectiveness of these products in the classroom, and reflects critically on the promises and pitfalls of new media in historical practice. The Center’s resources are designed to benefit professional historians, high school teachers, and students of history. Includes eight essays on the use of new technology in history teaching; announcements and reports on current projects; reviews of recent CD-ROMs; links to more than 1,000 history departments around the world, more than 1,500 history websites, and more than 200 CD-Roms; and six syllabi for George Mason University history courses. “Hypertext Scholarship in American Studies” includes four articles demonstrating uses of hypertext in scholarly contexts. Declaration: Interpreting the Declaration of Independence by Translation provides translations of the American Declaration of Independence into French, German, Polish, Russian, and Spanish, along with commentaries on the practice and problems of translating documents. The site also includes the electronic journal “English Matters,” designed for teachers and students of English. With the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the City University of New York (ASHP/CML), CHNM produces "History Matters."
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2002-10-28.

www.history
African-American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818–1907
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Randall Burkett.
Reviewed 2005-12-01.
This site presents approximately 350 African-American pamphlets and documents, most of them produced between 1875 and 1900. These works provide “a panoramic and eclectic review of African-American history and culture” in a number of forms, including sermons, organization reports, college catalogs, graduation orations, slave narratives, Congressional speeches, poetry, and playscripts. Topics covered include segregation, voting rights, violence against African Americans, and the colonization movement. Authors include Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Benjamin W. Arnett, Alexander Crummel, and Emanuel Love. Information about publication and a short description (75 words) of content accompanies each pamphlet. The site also offers a timeline of African-American history from 1852 to 1925 and reproductions of original documents and illustrations. A special presentation “The Progress of a People,” recreates a meeting of the National Afro-American Council in December 1898. A rich resource for studying 19th- and early 20th-century African-American leaders and representatives of African-American religious, civic, and social organizations.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
American Leaders Speak: Recordings from World War I and the 1920 Election
American Memory, Library of Congress.
Consists of 59 sound recordings of speeches by American leaders produced from 1918 to 1920 on the Nation’s Forum record label. The speeches—by such prominent public figures as Warren G. Harding, James M. Cox, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Samuel Gompers, Henry Cabot Lodge, John J. Pershing, Will H. Hays, A. Mitchell Palmer, and Rabbi Stephen S. Wise—deal for the most part with issues and events related to World War I and the 1920 presidential election. Additional topics include social unrest, Americanism, bolshevism, taxes, and business practices. Speeches range from 1 to 5 minutes in length. A special presentation, “From War to Normalcy,” introduces the Nation’s Forum Collection with representative recordings from World War I and the 1920 election, including Harding’s famous pronouncement that Americans need “not nostrums but normalcy.” This site includes photographs of speakers and of the actual recording disk labels, as well as text versions of the speeches.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-03.

www.history
Votes for Women: Selections from the National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection, 1848–1921
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Eileen V. Wallis.
Reviewed 2012-03-01.
This site, representing a subset of items from the Library of Congress' National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) Collection, consists of 167 books, pamphlets, handbooks, reports, speeches, and other artifacts totaling some 10,000 pages dealing with the suffrage movement in America. Much of the larger collection was donated by Carrie Chapman Catt, the Association’s longtime president. Also included are works from the libraries of some of the organization’s officers and members, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, Alice Stone Blackwell, Julia Ward Howe, Elizabeth Smith Miller, and Mary A. Livermore. Formed in 1890, NAWSA secured the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 through a series of well-organized state campaigns. The site includes 2 bibliographies of related works on the suffrage campaign, a 700-word essay on Catt, a timeline entitled “One Hundred Years toward Suffrage: An Overview,” and links to 11 related collections. While a special application is necessary to view reproductions of documents and illustrations, texts of documents have been scanned and are word-searchable. Also see the site’s pictorial partner at . Useful for studying women in politics, female leaders, and suffrage.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-03.

www.history
Exploring Amistad: Race and the Boundaries of Freedom in Maritime Antebellum America
Mystic Seaport Museum.
See JAH web review by John David Smith.
Reviewed 2001-09-01.
Presents more than 500 primary documents relating to the 1839–1842 revolt of enslaved Africans aboard the schooner Amistad, their legal struggles in the United States, and the multifaceted cultural and social dimensions of their case. The site features a searchable library that contains 32 items from personal papers, 33 legal decisions and arguments, 18 selections from the “popular media,” including pamphlets, journal articles, reports, a playbill, and a poem; 103 government publications, 28 images, 11 maps and nautical charts, and 310 newspaper articles and editorials. Also includes suggestions for using these materials in the classroom, a timeline, 28 links to other resources, and a ”living the history" component that encourages user feedback and participation. A visually attractive, well-conceived site that provides a wealth of materials for students of slavery, race, politics, and print culture in antebellum America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-17.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Avalon Project: Documents in Law, History, and Government
William C. Fray and Lisa A. Spar.
This website, sponsored by Yale Law School with the International Relations and Security Network (ISN), is a collection of over 3,500 full-text documents relevant to the fields of law, history, economics, politics, diplomacy, and government. The documents are divided into four century categories: pre-18th, 18th, 19th, and 20th. Includes treaties, presidential papers and addresses, and colonial charters, as well as state and federal constitutional and legal documents. The documents are grouped into 64 Major Collection categories as well, such as Thomas Jefferson’s papers, American diplomacy, and the Cold War. All materials can be accessed through an alphabetical list, through the Major Collections page, through the four century pages, or by a keyword search. All of the search modes are easily navigable. Though most of these documents are directly related to American history, the site also includes over 100 documents on ancient, medieval, and Renaissance history, European history, and modern diplomatic documents such as the Hamas Covenant. The site is ideal for researching American diplomacy, constitutional, political, and legal history.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
CWIHP: Cold War International History Project
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.
See JAH web review by Mark Atwood Lawrence.
Reviewed 2013-12-01.
Much scholarship on the Cold War has been written by Westerners with little access to sources in Soviet archives. This extensive collection seeks to remedy the holes in Cold War historiography by actively collecting sources from the former Communist bloc. Thousands of documents in the diplomatic history of the Cold War are currently available, stretching in time from the 1945–46 Soviet occupation of northern Iran through the late 1990s. These sources, all carefully annotated, are divided both into collections and by geographic region. The 50 document collections cover a wide range of topics, including both specific events (1954 Geneva Conference on Indochina, 1956 Hungarian Revolution, 1980–81 Polish Crisis) and broader topics stretching over longer periods of time (Economic Cold War, Nuclear Non-Proliferation, The Cold War in Africa). The collections vary widely in size, between three and several hundred documents, and include primarily official documents and communication—meeting minutes, memoranda, transcribed conversations between leaders, reports, and several personal letters and diary entries.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-10-28.

www.history
South Texas Border, 1900–1920: Photographs from the Robert Runyon Collection
American Memory, Library of Congress and University of Texas, Austin.
See JAH web review by Neil Foley.
Reviewed 2003-03-01.
A collection featuring the life’s work of commercial photographer Robert Runyon (1881–1968), totalling more than 8,000 images, that document the history and development of South Texas and the border, including the U.S. military presence in the area prior to and during World War I and the growth and development of the Rio Grande Valley in the early 1900s. A special section presents nine of Runyon’s 350 photographs of the Mexican Revolution (1910–20) in Matamoros, Monterrey, Ciudad Victoria, and the Texas border area from 1913 through 1916. Includes a 900-word essay on the Revolution and a 1,100-word biographical essay on Runyon. An Ameritech Award Winner. Of use to those studying the history of documentary photography, images of the Mexican Revolution, and Texas history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
Documents from the Continental Congress and Constitutional Convention
Library of Congress, American Memory Project.
This archive offers 274 documents relating to the work of the Continental Congress and the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, including manuscript annotations. The collection includes extracts of the journals of Congress, resolutions, proclamations, committee reports, treaties, documents relating to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, extracts of proceedings of state assemblies and conventions relating to the ratification of the Constitution, several essays on ratification of the Constitution, and early printed versions of the U.S. Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. It includes 253 titles dating from 1774 to 1788 relating to the Constitutional Congress and twenty-one dating from 1786 to 1789 relating to the Constitutional Convention. The collection can be browsed through an alphabetical list of subjects or searched using keywords. An advanced search is also available. Additionally, two timelines that together cover the period 1764 to 1789 and an essay entitled “To Form a More Perfect Union” provide historical context for the documents through an overview of the main events of the era of the Revolution. A useful resource for studying the history of the revolutionary era and the Constitution.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-14.

www.history
U.S. Senate Historical Office
U.S. Senate Historical Office.
See JAH web review by Drew E. VandeCreek.
Reviewed 2004-06-01.
This collection of essays about the history of the U.S. Senate begins with a brief overview (900 words). More than 140 “historical minutes” (300 words) discuss interesting events in the Senate from 1789 to 1980. Events include the caning of Charles Sumner in 1856, the 1914 ban on smoking in the Senate chamber, and a 1935 Huey Long filibuster. The complete texts of 15 oral histories, of 40 to 700 pages, of retired senators and Senate staff members are available and 15 others may be ordered. The oral histories cover 1910 to 1984 and deal with a wide range of issues, including the desegregation of the staff, the McCarthy hearings, preparations to impeach Nixon, rhetorical rules of debate, and the impact of computers on the work of the senate. Staff members include pages, the Sergeant at Arms, aides, administrative assistants, and the first African-American Government Documents Clerk. A collection of 26 essays (500 to 3000 words) discuss Senate procedure, leadership, officers of the Senate, and general information, such as the development of the oath of office. Other essays include 2,400 words on the president pro-tempore and a 1,300 word essay on the 1959 committee, chaired by John F. Kennedy, that designated the five most outstanding senators in American history. The site also includes a section of frequently asked questions about the Senate and links to a directory that provides a 150-word biography of every senator and vice president as well as many congress people and staff members. Statistics about majority and minority leaders and the practice of switching parties are also provided. The minutes of Senate Republican Conferences from 1911 to 1964 and Senate Democratic Conferences from 1903 to 1964 are available in their entirety. Visitors may also read the full texts of eight lectures given by statesmen, such as George Bush and Senator Robert C. Byrd as part of the Leaders Lectures series established in 1988 by Trent Lott. The site is easy to navigate and will be useful for research in the history of American political institutions.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum.
See JAH web review by Gregory Wilson.
Reviewed 2002-06-02.
The heart of this collection of material about Lyndon Baines Johnson is the group of 64 oral history interviews selected from a collection of more than 1,000. Oral histories, from 35 to 200 pages, include interviews with Dean Rusk, Johnson’s secretary, Bess Abell, Robert MacNamara, Thurgood Marshall, and Billy Graham. Of the 2,600 recorded telephone conversations in the Johnson archives, the site provides transcribed samples of conversations with five people, including Adam Clayton Powell and Jacqueline Kennedy. The site also links to a C-SPAN collection of more than 800 transcribed recorded excerpts and full conversations Johnson had while in office. A selection of 20 speeches and nine messages to Congress are available in transcription and address issues such as the Great Society and limitations on the war in Vietnam. Also provided is an advertisement from the 1964 presidential campaign. A selection of 50 facsimile entries from Johnson’s office diary, kept by his secretaries, includes meals as well as events of his first day in office, his reaction to incidents in the Gulf of Tonkin, a meeting with George Wallace about sending federal troops to Selma, and Johnson’s announcement that he would not seek re-election. Diary entries range from three to 20 pages. Visitors may listen to two audio files of less than a minute each in which Johnson is sworn in following Kennedy’s assassination and comments on events. Facsimiles of 98 National Security Action memoranda discuss policies towards Vietnam, nuclear weapons, and Latin America, among other issues. A collection of 37 photographs depict Johnson in meetings with other important figures of the time, including Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. Biographical information about Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson is provided in two chronologies. In addition, an exhibit from the Johnson museum provides a 6,200-word essay about events in Johnson’s lifetime. This site will be very useful for research about Johnson’s presidency and major events of the 1960s.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-15.

www.history
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Home for a membership organization of more than 500 colleges and universities worldwide, this site provides “access to a vast archive of social science data for research and instruction.” Data offered is in a variety of sociological and political areas, including census enumerations; urban and community studies; conflict, violence, and wars; economic behavior; legal systems; legislative bodies; mass political behavior and attitudes; and organizational behavior. While much of the site emphasizes the late twentieth century, data sets such as “Historical and Contemporary Electoral Processes” and “1790–1960 Censuses” will be useful to studies of earlier periods. Includes five special topic archives with data in linked sites geared to health, education, aging, criminal justice, and substance abuse and mental health concerns. Also provides 45 links to related sites. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social and political history. The site plans in the future to introduce “a set of pages that focuses on the needs and interests of novice data users.”
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-22.

www.history
Kentuckiana Digital Library
Kentucky Virtual Library.
Provides a wealth of historical material from 15 Kentucky colleges, universities, libraries, and historical societies. Includes nearly 8,000 photographs; 95 full-text books, manuscripts, and journals, from 1784 to 1971; 94 oral history interviews; 78 issues of the magazine Mountain Life & Work, from 1925–62; and 22 issues of the publication Works Progress Administration in Kentucky: Narrative Reports, covering 1935–37. Includes photographic collections of renowned photographer Russell Lee, who documented health conditions resulting from coal industry practices; Roy Stryker, head of the Farm Security Administration photographic project; and others that provide images of a variety of cities, towns, schools, camps, and disappearing cultures. Presents oral histories pertaining to Supreme Court Justice Stanley F. Reed, U.S. Senator John Sherman Cooper, the Frontier Nursing Service, American military veterans, Appalachian fiddlers, and the transition of an area from farming to an industrial economy. Texts include Civil War diaries, religious tracts, speeches, correspondence, and scrapbooks. Includes documents on colonization societies, civil rights, education, railroads, feuding, the Kentucky Derby, exploits of Daniel Boone, pioneer surgery, and a recollection of Abraham Lincoln. Valuable for those studying changes in the social and cultural history of the state.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
WTO History Project
University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Patrick F. Gillham.
Reviewed 2013-09-01.
Designed to provide access now and in the future to documents created by groups that protested the World Trade Organization’s “Ministerial Week,” held in Seattle from November 29-December 3, 1999. Offers texts of more than 80 oral histories of organizers and participants, 73 photographs, and images of 224 fliers, posters, and leaflets. Also includes 46 planning documents, 18 signs carried by protesters, two audio files, three videos, and a timeline documenting 520 events from March to December 1999. A second timeline covers the week of protests and a table with contact information for more than 1,400 organizations that opposed the meetings. Documents in the collection can be searched by keyword, organizations, and issues—labor, environment, trade, democracy, direct action, food, agriculture, health, and independent media. The site’s creators state they are “dedicated to ensuring that any account ever written of the WTO protests be attentive to the range of people who turned out, the varieties of strategies and issues they brought to the streets and the meeting rooms, and the coalitions that emerged and failed.” As a result, the site will be of great value to those studying social protest movements in the late 20th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2003-11-29.

www.history
Thomas Jefferson Digital Archive
University of Virginia Library.
See JAH web review by Robert M. S. McDonald.
Reviewed 2004-12-01.
Provides more than 1,700 texts—correspondence, books, addresses, and a variety of public papers—written by or to Thomas Jefferson. Most texts are presented in transcribed, word-searchable format; 18 appear as color images of original manuscripts. The site also includes a biography of Jefferson written in 1834, eight years after his death. The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia, published in 1900, organizes more than 9,000 quotes according to theme and other categories. A collection of 2,700 excerpts from Jefferson’s writings present his political philosophy. A wealth of searchable bibliographic listings is provided, including two previously published volumes and thousands of additional bibliographic references. Also contains a recent dissertation on the construction of the Jefferson-designed University of Virginia (UVA), listings from the Oxford English Dictionary that show Jefferson’s influence on English language usage, and four links to UVA exhibitions on Jefferson. Extremely valuable for the study of Jefferson and the period of the early republic.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Digital Library of Georgia
University of Georgia Libraries.
Provides an enormous amount of material digitized from collections housed in libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions in the state of Georgia. Legal materials include more than 17,000 public state government documents from 1994 to the present, updated daily, and a complete set of Acts and Resolutions from 1799 to 1995. A set of “Southeastern Native American Documents” provides approximately 2,000 letters, legal documents, military orders, financial papers, and archeological images covering the period 1730–1842. Materials from the Civil War-era include a soldier’s diary and two collections of letters, one from the wife of an Atlanta lawyer and plantation owner. The site provides a collection of 80 full-text, word-searchable versions of books from the early nineteenth century to the 1920s and three historic newspapers. The site also includes approximately 2,500 political cartoons by Clifford H. “Baldy” Baldowski, from 1946–1982; copies from a first-hand account of a violent incident of civil unrest during a political rally in 1868; Jimmy Carter’s diaries of 1971–75 and 1977–81; annual reports of the mayor of Savannah, 1865–1917; photographs of African Americans from around Augusta in the late 19th century; and 1,500 architectural and landscape photographs from the 1940s to the 1980s. A valuable collection for students of southern life, politics, law, and culture.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
RFK in the Land of Apartheid: A Ripple of Hope
Larry Shore, Hunter College, CUNY.
Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s trip to South Africa in June 1966 to protest that country’s system of apartheid and support efforts to combat it is amply documented on this site with texts, audio files, film clips, and photographs. The site provides texts of the five speeches delivered by Kennedy during the visit—for three of these, full audio files are provided. Also offers texts of 13 additional speeches—from South African students and political leaders, as well as American leaders—with six available in audio format. Background annotations of up to 100 words accompany all texts. A newspapers section on the press coverage of the visit provides nine articles from U.S. newspapers and 15 articles from South African newspapers. A magazines section provides seven articles about the visit, including a Look magazine article about the trip written by the senator; and a cartoon section highlights 12 political cartoons. The site also provides 13 related documents, and more sources can be found in the “Resources” section. These include the “Black Christ” painting that caused uproar in 1962, 11 posters of Nelson Mendela, 11 annotated political cartoons, two national anthems for comparison, and 19 recommended books and links to 19 relevant sites. An overview essay of 3,500 words describes the “enormous impact” of Kennedy’s visit and illuminates “the manner in which he subtly challenged and undermined some of the pillars of apartheid ideology and mythology.” A study materials section is designed for use in high schools and colleges with questions for class discussion and a feedback questionnaire. Additionally, the site’s audio and video streaming now works with Realplayer and Mediaplayer, and the video streaming also now works with with Quicktime. A valuable site for studying the history of race relations in South Africa and the United States.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2011-07-19.

www.history
Plymouth Colony Archive Project
Patricia Scott Deetz, Christopher Fennell, and J. Eric Deetz, University of Virginia.
See JAH web review by John Saillant.
Reviewed 2004-06-01.
Presents a wealth of documents and analytical essays pertaining to the social history of Plymouth Colony from 1620 to 1691. Also offers a tribute to the scholarly work of the late James Deetz, Harrison Professor of Historical Archaeology, University of Virginia. Documents include 135 probates, 24 wills, and 14 texts containing laws and court cases on such subjects as land division, master-servant relations, sexual misconduct, and disputes involving Native Americans. In addition, the site provides more than 90 biographical studies, research papers and topical articles by James Deetz, Patricia Scott Deetz, and their students that analyze “life ways” of 395 individuals who lived in the colony and offer theoretical views on the colony’s legal structure, women’s roles, vernacular house forms, and domestic violence, among other topics. Includes 25 maps or plans of the colony; approximately 50 photographs; excerpts from Deetz’s books on the history and myths of Plymouth Colony and on Anglo-American gravestone styles; seven lesson plans; an extensive glossary of archaeological terms; and tributes to Deetz. Valuable for those interested in historical anthropology, material culture studies, and American colonial history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-09.

www.history
First American West: The Ohio River Valley, 1750–1820
American Memory, Library of Congress; University of Chicago Library; and Filson Historical Society.
Provides approximately 15,000 pages of historical published and unpublished manuscript material related to the migration of Europeans west into the Ohio River Valley during the latter half of the 18th century and beginning of the 19th. Includes books, pamphlets, newspapers, periodicals, journals, letters, legal documents, pictorial images, maps, ledgers, and other types of material. The collection, from the University of Chicago Library and Filson Historical Society of Louisville, Kentucky, was started in the late 19th century by a group dedicated to preserving documents related to Kentucky and Ohio River Valley history. The site includes a special presentation with a 6,500-word hyperlink-filled essay arranged into five sections on contested lands, peoples and migration, empires and politics, Western life and culture, and the construction of a Western past. The site offers materials on encounters between Europeans and native peoples, the lives of African-American slaves in the area, the role of institutions such as churches and schools, the position of women in this society, the thoughts of naturalists and other scientists, and activities of the migrants, including travel, land acquisition, planting, navigation of rivers, and trade. Well-known personages represented include Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr, James Madison, and William Henry Harrison. Includes a 26-title bibliography and annotated links to 19 related sites. Valuable for students and serious researchers of early American history, the history of cross-cultural encounters in the West, frontier history, and the construction of the nation’s past.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-19.

www.history
The History of Jim Crow
Richard Wormhiser, Bill Jersey, Sam Pollard, WNET.
See JAH web review by Joseph Crespino.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
This site for educators was produced as an online companion to The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow, a four-part television series that tells the story of the African-American struggle for freedom during the era of segregation. The site consists of five sections, including television, history, geography, American literature, and teacher resources. “Television” provides teachers with guides to four part, from the end of the Civil War to the historic 1954 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. The history section contains six historical essays (each between 5,000 to 7,000 words), including the introductory essay “Terror to Triumph,” and five themed essays focusing on creating, surviving, resisting, escaping, and transcending Jim Crow oppression from the late-19th-century to the Civil Rights movement. Additional shorter essays, most between 600 to 1,300 words, cover topics such as the lynching of Emmett Till and Jackie Robinson. “Geography” features ten interactive maps that give “a multi-layered look at the impact of Jim Crow on the social and political landscape of the nation.” The map themes include African-American press, Jim Crow laws inside and outside the south, and most gripping of all, the riots and lynching map that portrays a representative selection of the thousands of recorded acts of violence that occurred across the United States from 1889 to 1918. The American literature section presents interdisciplinary lesson plans designed to illustrate the connection between Jim Crow and 20th-century American writing. This section also contains an American literature book list for middle school, high school, and college-level students, including units on Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Alice Walker’s The Color Purple. The final section, teacher resources, offers more than 25 lesson plans, an interactive encyclopedia, an image gallery with historical photographs, and first hand narratives from people who experienced life under Jim Crow. This well organized and wonderfully equipped site is an invaluable resource for history and literature educators.
Resources Available: .
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
After the Day of Infamy: “Man on the Street” Interviews Following the Attack on Pearl Harbor
American Memory, Library of Congress.
The Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The following day, Alan Lomax, head of the Archive of American Folk Song, asked fieldworkers in the Library of Congress Radio Research Project to make documentary recordings in cities and towns around the United States. These fieldworkers collected “man-on-the-street” reactions to the bombing and the declaration of war by the United States. In January and February, 1942, fieldworkers collected a second set of recordings, asking people to address their views of the attack and declaration of war directly to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. This presentation consists of both sets of recordings, totaling approximately 12 hours, offering the thoughts and opinions of more than 200 Americans “after the day of infamy.” Related written documents created by fieldworkers, correspondence with archive staff, biographies of the fieldworkers, and dust jackets from the original disks are also included. The interviews are available in audio and text and are searchable by keyword, as well as by subject, state, or name of interviewee.
Resources Available: TEXT, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-27.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.