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There are 136 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
New Deal Network
Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute and Institute for Learning Technologies, Teachers College, Columbia University.
See JAH web review by Charles Forcey.
Reviewed 2002-03-01.
A database of more than 20,000 items relating to the New Deal. A “Document Library” contains more than 900 newspaper and journal articles, speeches, letters, reports, advertisements, and other textual materials, treating a broad array of subjects relevant to the period’s social, cultural, political, and economic history, while placing special emphasis on New Deal relief agencies and issues relating to labor, education, agriculture, the Supreme Court, and African Americans. The “Photo Gallery” of more than 5,000 images is organized into five units—“Culture,” “Construction,” “Social Programs,” “Federal Agencies,” and miscellaneous, including photos from 11 exhibitions and five series of photoessays, and images of disaster relief and public figures. The site additionally offers featured exhibits, many with lesson plan suggestions. Presently, the features section includes “The Magpie Sings the Depression,” a collection of 193 poems, articles, and short stories, and 275 graphics from a Bronx high school journal published between 1929 and 1941 with juvenile works by novelist James Baldwin, photographer Richard Avedon, cultural critic Robert Warshow, and film critic Stanley Kauffmann; “Dear Mrs Roosevelt” with selected letters written by young people to the first lady; “Student Activism in the 1930s,” which contains 38 photographs, graphics, and editorial cartoons, 12 American Student Union memoirs, 40 autobiographical essays, and a 20,000-word essay by Robert Cohen on 1930s campus radicalism; 17 selected interviews from American slave narratives gathered by the Works Progress Administration; and an illustrated essay on the history and social effects of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Includes approximately 100 annotated links to related sites. Of great value for teachers, students, and researchers interested in the social history of the New Deal era.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-18.

www.history
Remembering Jim Crow
American RadioWorks.
See JAH web review by Joseph Crespino.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
A companion site to the NPR radio documentary on segregated life in the South (broadcast in February 2002). Presents 30 audio excerpts, ranging from one minute to ten minutes in length, and approximately 130 photographs, arranged in six thematically-organized sections. Covers legal, social, and cultural aspects of segregation, black community life, and black resistance to the Jim Crow way of life. As anthropologist Kate Ellis, one of the site’s creators, notes, the interviews display a “marked contrast between African American and white reflections on Jim Crow.” Many of the photographs come from personal collections of the people interviewed. The site also includes 16 photographs taken by Farm Security Administration photographer Russell Lee in New Iberia, Louisiana. The site provides audio files and transcripts of the original radio documentary, more than 90 additional stories, a sampling of state segregation laws arranged by topic, links to 9 related sites, and a 41-title bibliography. The project creators—Ellis and personnel from American RadioWorks, the Minnesota Public Radio documentary producers—used interviews selected from more than 1,000 oral histories compiled by Duke University’s “Behind the Veil” project, in addition to conducting new interviews. The short 100-word introductions to each section succinctly provide a contextual framework to the documentary material. Valuable for those studying the American South, race relations, and African American history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Votes for Women: Selections from the National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection, 1848–1921
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Eileen V. Wallis.
Reviewed 2012-03-01.
This site, representing a subset of items from the Library of Congress' National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) Collection, consists of 167 books, pamphlets, handbooks, reports, speeches, and other artifacts totaling some 10,000 pages dealing with the suffrage movement in America. Much of the larger collection was donated by Carrie Chapman Catt, the Association’s longtime president. Also included are works from the libraries of some of the organization’s officers and members, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, Alice Stone Blackwell, Julia Ward Howe, Elizabeth Smith Miller, and Mary A. Livermore. Formed in 1890, NAWSA secured the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920 through a series of well-organized state campaigns. The site includes 2 bibliographies of related works on the suffrage campaign, a 700-word essay on Catt, a timeline entitled “One Hundred Years toward Suffrage: An Overview,” and links to 11 related collections. While a special application is necessary to view reproductions of documents and illustrations, texts of documents have been scanned and are word-searchable. Also see the site’s pictorial partner at . Useful for studying women in politics, female leaders, and suffrage.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-03.

www.history
Exploring Amistad: Race and the Boundaries of Freedom in Maritime Antebellum America
Mystic Seaport Museum.
See JAH web review by John David Smith.
Reviewed 2001-09-01.
Presents more than 500 primary documents relating to the 1839–1842 revolt of enslaved Africans aboard the schooner Amistad, their legal struggles in the United States, and the multifaceted cultural and social dimensions of their case. The site features a searchable library that contains 32 items from personal papers, 33 legal decisions and arguments, 18 selections from the “popular media,” including pamphlets, journal articles, reports, a playbill, and a poem; 103 government publications, 28 images, 11 maps and nautical charts, and 310 newspaper articles and editorials. Also includes suggestions for using these materials in the classroom, a timeline, 28 links to other resources, and a ”living the history" component that encourages user feedback and participation. A visually attractive, well-conceived site that provides a wealth of materials for students of slavery, race, politics, and print culture in antebellum America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-17.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The Dramas of Haymarket
Carl Smith, Northwestern University, and Chicago Historical Society.
See JAH web review by Martin Blatt.
Reviewed 2001-12-01.
Curated by Carl Smith, Professor of English and American Studies at Northwestern University in a collaborative effort with the Chicago Historical Society, this rich site provides an online exhibit commemorating one of the most notorious incidents in late-nineteenth-century labor history, the Haymarket Affair. On May 4, 1886, two workers were killed in a struggle between police and locked-out union members at the McCormick Reaper factory. On May 5, 1886, someone threw a dynamite bomb into a group of Chicago policemen sent to control the ensuing protest, killing seven. This site is an online exhibit of selected materials from the Chicago Historical Society’s Haymarket Affair Digital Collection. Organized in the form of a drama, the site contains a prologue, five acts, and an epilogue, all arranged chronologically. The prologue, “Whither America,” covers the period between Chicago’s Great Fire in 1871 through 1880, with emphasis on the railroad strike of 1877 and other developments in the radicalization of American workers. Act I, “Subterranean Fire,” discusses the widening class divisions and resulting rising level of violence in America. Act II, “Let Your Tragedy be Enacted Here,” recounts the demonstrations of 1886, the protestors’ meeting, and the bombing. Act III, “Toils of the Law,” covers the legal proceedings beginning with the “red scare” and police “witch hunt” following the bombing and continuing through the sentencing of the convicted anarchists in October 1886. Act IV, “Voice of People,” relates the legal and public appeals ending with the executions of 1887. Act V, “Raising the Dead,” moves from the funerals of the executed men to Governor John P. Altgeld’s pardon of the surviving defendants in 1893. The epilogue, “Drama Without End,” deals with the contested heritage of Haymarket, including centennial events in 1986. Each part consists of a 500-word interpretive essay and topical sections including a total of over 50 visual materials, such as images of artifacts, photographs, and engravings of the people involved in the Haymarket Affair, and over 30 facsimiles of selected manuscripts and printed materials. Each “Act” contains a final section that includes full-text transcriptions of documents from the Haymarket Digital Collection. The site also includes virtual tours of the Haymarket area and of Forest Home Cemetery, where a monument to the convicted men is located, and audio recordings of contemporary labor songs. This site is beautifully contextualized, well-presented, and easy to navigate. It contains a keyword search engine as well as a table of contents.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
WTO History Project
University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Patrick F. Gillham.
Reviewed 2013-09-01.
Designed to provide access now and in the future to documents created by groups that protested the World Trade Organization’s “Ministerial Week,” held in Seattle from November 29-December 3, 1999. Offers texts of more than 80 oral histories of organizers and participants, 73 photographs, and images of 224 fliers, posters, and leaflets. Also includes 46 planning documents, 18 signs carried by protesters, two audio files, three videos, and a timeline documenting 520 events from March to December 1999. A second timeline covers the week of protests and a table with contact information for more than 1,400 organizations that opposed the meetings. Documents in the collection can be searched by keyword, organizations, and issues—labor, environment, trade, democracy, direct action, food, agriculture, health, and independent media. The site’s creators state they are “dedicated to ensuring that any account ever written of the WTO protests be attentive to the range of people who turned out, the varieties of strategies and issues they brought to the streets and the meeting rooms, and the coalitions that emerged and failed.” As a result, the site will be of great value to those studying social protest movements in the late 20th century.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2003-11-29.

www.history
RFK in the Land of Apartheid: A Ripple of Hope
Larry Shore, Hunter College, CUNY.
Senator Robert F. Kennedy’s trip to South Africa in June 1966 to protest that country’s system of apartheid and support efforts to combat it is amply documented on this site with texts, audio files, film clips, and photographs. The site provides texts of the five speeches delivered by Kennedy during the visit—for three of these, full audio files are provided. Also offers texts of 13 additional speeches—from South African students and political leaders, as well as American leaders—with six available in audio format. Background annotations of up to 100 words accompany all texts. A newspapers section on the press coverage of the visit provides nine articles from U.S. newspapers and 15 articles from South African newspapers. A magazines section provides seven articles about the visit, including a Look magazine article about the trip written by the senator; and a cartoon section highlights 12 political cartoons. The site also provides 13 related documents, and more sources can be found in the “Resources” section. These include the “Black Christ” painting that caused uproar in 1962, 11 posters of Nelson Mendela, 11 annotated political cartoons, two national anthems for comparison, and 19 recommended books and links to 19 relevant sites. An overview essay of 3,500 words describes the “enormous impact” of Kennedy’s visit and illuminates “the manner in which he subtly challenged and undermined some of the pillars of apartheid ideology and mythology.” A study materials section is designed for use in high schools and colleges with questions for class discussion and a feedback questionnaire. Additionally, the site’s audio and video streaming now works with Realplayer and Mediaplayer, and the video streaming also now works with with Quicktime. A valuable site for studying the history of race relations in South Africa and the United States.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2011-07-19.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Territorial Kansas Online
Kansas State Historical Society and University of Kansas.
See JAH web review by Michael D. Pierson.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
This repository of Territorial Kansas collections convey the growing divisions in Kansas and the nation over the expansion of slavery, federalism, nationalism, industrialization of the North, and changing political coalitions in Congress. Users have access to government documents, diaries, letters, photographs, maps, newspapers, rare secondary sources, historical artifacts, and images of historic sites where some of the territorial confrontations occurred. Divided into five sections (Territorial Politics and Government, Border Warfare, Immigration and Early Settlement, Personalities, and National Debate about Kansas) each is searchable by keyword, author, and county. The topical sections are subdivided into relevant themes and include an introductory essay (between 1,000 and 2,000 words). Visitors will find essays on territorial politics, the rights of women and African Americans, military organizations, and free state and pro-slavery organizations. The Personalities section list 31 individuals, including John Brown and John Calhoun, and the final section presents both anti-slavery and pro-slavery perspectives of the national debate about Kansas. The site also includes a timeline with links and an annotated bibliography. An ongoing project, lesson plans are currently being added.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-01.

www.history
Slavery and the Making of America
PBS.
This extensive companion to the PBS documentary of the same name provides interpretive and primary material on the history of African-Americans during slavery and Reconstruction, including essays, personal narratives, original documents, historical readings, and lesson plans. The “Time and Place” chronology of slavery and Reconstruction places the main events of U.S. history relating to African Americans between 1619 and 1881 in their historical context. “Slave Memories” allows visitors to hear the voices of African Americans recorded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) on their experiences in slavery and Reconstruction. “Resources” includes 17 print resources, 23 books for children, and 30 websites related to slavery. “Slave Experience” allows users to explore slave life through the themes of legal rights and government; family; men, women, and gender; living conditions; education, arts, and culture; religion; responses to enslavement; and freedom and emancipation. Each features essays, historical overviews, original documents, and personal narratives. A K-12 learning section features historical readings of narratives, slave stories and letters, student plays, links to 19 sites with primary sources, and six lesson plans for middle and high school. This website is a valuable resource for teachers as well as an excellent introduction and overview for those with an interest in the history of slavery and slave life in America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.
See JAH web review by Clare Corbould.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This extensive, well-designed website features images, essays, lesson plans, and maps all focused on the movements of African Americans from the 1400s to the present. The site is built around the history of 13 African American migration experiences: the transatlantic slave trade (1450s-1867), runaway journeys (1630s-1865), the domestic slave trade (1760s-1865), colonization and emigration (1783–1910s), Haitian Immigration (1791–1809), Western migration (1840s-1970), Northern migration (1840s- 1890), the Great Migration (1916–1930), the Second Great Migration (1940–1970), Caribbean immigration (1900-present), the return South migration (1970-present), Haitian immigration in the 20th century (1970-present), and African immigration (1970-present). Each section includes an extensive image gallery with 60 or more images, two or more color maps and charts, an overview, short web essays on aspects of the migration with links to excerpts from various works on the subject, educational materials, a bibliography, and links to related websites. There are more than 67 detailed and informative color maps and more than 8,300 images available. Educational materials include at least two lesson plans (most have five or more) in each section and links to related resources. More than 90 lesson plans are available. An interactive timeline extends from the 15th to the 21st century and places migration in the context of U.S. history and the history of the African Diaspora. Searching is limited to a keyword search.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Alcohol, Temperance, and Prohibition
Brown University Library.
See JAH web review by Elaine Frantz Parsons.
Reviewed 2007-12-01.
A small, but useful, site with a wide range of primary source material for researching the history of the prohibition movement, temperance, or alcoholism, this archive presents broadsides, sheet music, pamphlets, and government publications related to the temperance movement and prohibition. Materials include items from the period leading up to prohibition as well as the prohibition era itself, ending with the passage of the 21st amendment in 1933. More than 1,800 items can be browsed by title, creator, or publisher. The collection is also searchable by keyword (basic and advanced searches are available). All digitized items are in the public domain. A historical essay, “Temperance and Prohibition Era Propaganda: A Study in Rhetoric” by Leah Rae Berk is available.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman’s Party
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This combined archive and exhibit offers a selection of 448 photographs from the Library’s National Woman’s Party (NWP) collection that “document the National Woman’s Party’s push for ratification of the 19th Amendment as well as its later campaign for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment.” Photographs span the years 1875 to 1938, but most date from 1913 to 1922. Visitors can browse photographs by title or subject or search the descriptive information. The site has a photo gallery of more than 50 photographs depicting NWP activists who were arrested and imprisoned for their role in suffrage protests. Additionally, the site provides a timeline of the National Woman’s Party from 1912 to 1997 that places it in historical context. The site also provides three essays: on the tactics and techniques of the National Woman’s Party suffrage campaign, a historical overview of the NWP, and on leaders of the NWP.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Slavery in New York
New York Historical Society.
Focusing on the "collective and personal experiences of Africans and African-Americans” in New York City, this collection presents nine galleries that explore various themes and time periods in New York City’s history of slavery, the Atlantic slave trade and New York City, slavery in Dutch New York, the growth of slavery in British Colonial New York, freedom for blacks in Revolutionary-War New York, the Gradual Emancipation Act of 1799, free blacks in the public life of post-revolutionary New York; black life in New York 1815–1827, Emancipation Day July 4 1827, and the history of scholarship on slavery in New York City. Each gallery has three panels: a gallery overview, a main thematic presentation, and one focusing on people, places, and documents. Of special interest are two interactive maps with timelines in the Dutch New York gallery and the Revolutionary War gallery; a small, but interesting, picture gallery on the portrayal of black’s in New York City’s public life; and profiles of nine African Americans who lived in New York City during the early republic. There is a thirty-four-page teacher’s guide (available for download or printing in .pdf format) with seven lesson plans, a guide to classroom materials, a brief history of slavery in New York City, and a select bibliography.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-07.

www.history
North American Women’s Letters and Diaries: Colonial Times to 1950
Stephen Rhind-Tutt.
See JAH web review by Ann Fabian.
Reviewed 2006-06-01.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This extensive archive offers approximately 150,000 pages of letters and diaries from colonial times to 1950, including 7,000 pages of previously unpublished manuscripts. Highlighted material includes extracts from the Journal of Mrs. Ann Manigault (1754–1781), the Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe, letters of Phyllis Wheatley, letters of Ellen Louisa Tucker to Ralph Waldo Emerson, letters of Margaret Fuller, and the memoirs and letters of Dolly Madison, wife of James Madison. Search the database by keyword or use the advanced search to find material by such fields as author, race, religion, age, occupation, date of writing, document type, historical event, or subject. More than 80 fields have been indexed. This website is available either through one-time purchase of perpetual rights or through annual subscription (your library or institution may have a subscription). This collection is a useful archive of material for teaching about the history of women as well as for research in women’s studies, social history, and cultural history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The Lincoln Institute
The Lincoln Institute.
This extensive website offers five projects on Abraham Lincoln’s life and political career along with teacher and student resources. Each section offers essays on the persons discussed. “Mr. Lincoln’s White House” explores the people and events related to the White House in Mr. Lincoln’s time, including a look at nearby areas of the city, and a section on visitors’ impressions of Lincoln. “Mr. Lincoln and the Founders” includes an essay on Lincoln and the Declaration of Independence, a background essay, observations by Lincoln scholars, and a bibliography. “Mr. Lincoln and Freedom,” explores Lincoln and the issue of slavery. Additional topics include “Mr. Lincoln and Friends” and “Mr. Lincoln and New York.” The “Teacher Assistance” page includes links to 13 lesson plans. The site also offers a link to “Abraham Lincoln’s Classroom” with resources for students and teachers, including quizzes, quotes, featured commentary, and links to maps. This site is an outstanding resource for material on teaching about Lincoln and the events of his presidency, as well as an excellent starting point for research on the Lincoln presidency and the politics and people of the Civil War era.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse
Especially since the 1950s, civil rights litigation has done much to influence government institutions. This website presents at least partial information on 2,243 injunctive civil rights cases (those seeking policy change and not money). These cases are divided by category. “Jail Conditions” and “Prison Conditions” contain the most cases, with roughly 550 each. “Immigration” and “Juvenile Institutions” also include more than 150 each. Other categories include: “Mental Health Institutions,” “Mental Retardation Institutions,” “Child Welfare,” “Nursing Home Cases,” “Policing Cases,” “Public Housing,” “Equal Employment,” and “School Desegregation,” among others. A good place to begin is the “Featured Cases” section on the website’s homepage, which highlights cases from the collection that are being litigated currently and or that are particularly relevant to current events. Cases are fully searchable by name, type, issue, district, circuit, state, causes of action, attorney organization, and people involved in the case. In addition, links to 141 case studies written by law students, professors, journalists, and policy advocates provide in-depth information on a specific case or issue, such as the Urban Institute’s “Baseline Assessment of Public Housing Desegregation Cases.” New material is added regularly.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2009-02-03.

www.history
Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project
James N. Gregory, University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Peter Cole.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This collection of hundreds of primary sources documents the long history of struggle for equal rights by various ethnic group sin Seattle, including Filipino, Chinese, Japanese and Native Americans, Jews, Latinos, and African Americans. The website integrates labor rights movements with struggles for political rights, as is evident in “special sections” that highlight the Chicano/a movement, the Black Panther Party, Filipino Cannery Unionism, the United Construction Workers Association, Communism, and the United Farm Workers. Each section brings together oral histories, documents, newspapers, and photographs that are accompanied by written and video commentary to provide historical context. The collection of more than 70 oral histories of activists is especially useful for understanding the lived experience of racism and its especially subtle workings in the Pacific Northwest. Together, these resources provide important national context for the civil rights struggle, too often understood as a solely southern phenomenon.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2006-11-22.

www.history
Online Archive of California
University of California.
This impressive archive provides more than 81,000 images and 1,000 texts on the history and culture of California. Images may be searched by keyword or browsed according to six categories: history, nature, people, places, society, and technology. Topics include exploration, Indians, gold rushes, and California events. Three collections of texts are also available. Japanese American Relocation Digital Archive furnishes 309 documents and 67 oral histories. Free Speech Movement: Student Protest, U.C. Berkeley, 1964–1965 provides 541 documents, including books, letters, press releases, oral histories, photographs, and trial transcripts. UC Berkeley Regional Oral History Office offers full-text transcripts of 139 interviews organized into 14 topics including agriculture, arts, California government, society and family life, wine industry, disability rights, Earl Warren, Jewish community leaders, medicine (including AIDS), suffragists, and U.C. Black alumni.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-10.

www.history
American History 102: Civil War to the Present
Stanley K. Schultz, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
This site reflects efforts to teach an American history survey course entirely through technology. Offers student lecture notes; 32 biographical sketches of prominent figures treated in the course, searchable by occupation, name, and era; bibliographic information; exams and review sheets; and a gallery of more than 200 photographs, many of which are taken from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The overall presentation is somewhat fragmented, but the site is rich in resources. Perhaps most valuable is a directory of history websites, organized by subject and time period. Professor Stanley Schultz and his associates have designed the site as a supplement for his videotaped lectures on the post-Civil War period.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Emma Goldman Papers
Berkeley Digital Library.
This site provides primary resources on Emma Goldman (1869–1940), a major figure in the history of radicalism and feminism in the United States prior to her deportation in 1919. Includes selections from 4 books by Goldman; 18 published essays and pamphlets; 4 speeches; 49 letters; 5 newspaper accounts of her activities; nearly 40 photographs, illustrations, and facsimiles of documents. Materials in this site were selected from those gathered and organized by the Emma Goldman Papers Project, an ongoing effort that has resulted in a 69-reel microfilm edition of her papers and other publications. Additional items in the site include selections from a traveling exhibition, issues of “Open Road: The Newsletter of the Emma Goldman Papers,” 4 sample documents from the forthcoming book edition of her papers; and a curriculum for middle and high school students to aid the study of freedom of expression, women’s rights, anti-militarism, and social change. The site reproduces a 6,500-word essay on the project’s history and a 9,000-word bibliographic essay.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-04.

www.history
Women’s History: The 1850 Worcester Convention
Worcester Women’s History Project, Assumption College.
To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the First National Women’s Rights Convention, held in 1850 in Worcester, MA, this site provides an archive of documents relating to the convention, including 8 speeches, 15 newspaper accounts, 14 letters, and selected items from the proceedings. Also offers three speeches from the 1851 convention, as well as a host of other resources concerning the 19th-century woman’s movement more generally. Diary entries, government reports, tracts for and against suffrage, poems from Godey’s Lady’s Book, and the full text of several books are included, such as The Lady’s Guide to Perfect Gentility (1856). On an ongoing basis, the site presents essays about and selections by formerly well-known advocates for women’s rights who since have been forgotten; currently the works of Jane Grey Swisshelm and Caroline Wells Healy Dall are featured. Also includes links to 24 related websites. Comprehensive with regard to the 1850 convention, and useful for more general resources devoted to the mid-19th-century women’s rights movement.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Martin Luther King, Jr., Papers Project
Stanford University.
Features texts by and about Martin Luther King, Jr., compiled as part of an effort to “publish King’s most significant correspondence, sermons, speeches, published writings, and unpublished manuscripts.” The site contains approximately 1,400 digitized speeches, sermons, and other writings, mostly taken from the four volumes the Project has published to date, covering the period 1929–1968. In addition, 16 chapters of materials collected from diverse sources and published by the Project in 1998 as The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. are available. Includes important sermons and speeches from later periods, including the 1963 “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” the March on Washington address; the Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech; and “Rediscovering Lost Values,” a sermon from 1954. The site also provides an interactive chronology of King’s life, two 1,000-word biographical essays by project director and historian Clayborne Carson; 23 audio files of recorded speeches and sermons; 12 articles on King by scholars and others; over 30 photographs; and 11 links to other resources. The site additionally offers a searchable inventory to King’s major papers and recordings. Regularly updated and expanded, this site is useful for studying the development of King’s views and discourse on civil rights, race relations, non-violence, education, peace, the war in Vietnam, and other political, religious, and philosophical topics.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-17.

www.history
Living the Legacy: The Women’s Rights Movement, 1848–1998
National Women’s History Project.
Furnishes secondary materials concerning women’s rights efforts in the U.S. from 1848 to the present. Includes a 5,000-word history of the movement; a 7,000-word chronology of political activism; six curriculum ideas; a detailed list of activities for high school students, librarians, and teachers to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the movement; listings for 54 prominent women’s history organizations, arranged alphabetically by state; basic information and/or links for 60 groups that treat contemporary women’s issues; and descriptive listings for 18 “costumed history performers” who portray public figures in women’s history. The site is sponsored by the National Women’s History Project, “a nonprofit organization, founded in 1980, that is committed to providing education, promotional materials, and informational services to recognize and celebrate women’s diverse lives and historic contributions to society.”
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University.
See JAH web review by Ellen Wiley Todd.
Reviewed 2001-06-01.
On March 25, 1911, a fire broke out at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City causing the deaths of 148 garment workers—an event that came to be known as one of the hallmark tragedies of the industrial age. This website tells the story of the fire in six chapters: Introduction; Sweatshops and Strikes; Fire; Mourning and Protest; Relief Work; and Investigation, Trial, and Reform. The text, targeted to a middle and high school student audience, is accompanied by numerous primary sources that could be of use to more advanced researchers. These include close to 70 photographs, 18 newspaper articles, 17 testimonials, three oral histories, excerpts from investigative reports written in the years following the fire, several letters from witnesses, a lecture given by Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins in 1964, and a radio drama re-enacting the event. Accompanying these primary sources is a list of victims and witnesses, a selected bibliography of works surrounding the fire, and tips for writing a student paper.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-28.

www.history
Anti-Saloon League, 1893–1933
Beth Weinhardt, Westerville, Ohio Public Library.
This selection of printed material is representative of the public campaigns of the Anti-Saloon League from 1893 to 1933. A six-page history of the League and the Temperance movement and six biographical essays (100 to 600 words) of leaders of the movement provide context. Facsimiles of 89 fliers produced by the League advocate temperance with arguments that include the effect of alcohol on puppies and German Emperor William II’s opinion of drinking. A periodicals section reproduces three covers, three sample articles, and one complete 1912 issue of American Patriot, a temperance magazine, and one cover of American Issue. Other material includes 14 wet and dry maps of the U.S. produced by the League, three temperance anthems, transcriptions of nine anti-alcohol stories, and 12 pro-temperance cartoons. In addition, six entries from the Standard Encyclopedia of the Alcohol Problem, published between 1925 and 1930, offer the Temperance perspective on communion wine, whiskey production, and alcohol use in China. A bibliography lists ten books on the Temperance movement and four biographies of movement leaders. Teachers will find 11 classroom activities relating to social reform. This site will be useful for research on reform movements and cultural history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-16.

www.history
Native American Documents Project
E. A. Schwartz, California State University at San Marcos.
Created by Professor E. A. Schwartz and primarily funded by the California State University at San Marcos Multicultural Studies Center, this site presents full-text transcriptions of primary documents pertaining to federal Indian policy in the late 19th century. The site includes three sets of data. The first set includes eight published reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and Board of Indian Commissioners for 1871, two appendices to the Board’s report, and a map that accompanied an 1875 report. These reports touch on most aspects of Indian policy during the late 19th century. A sophisticated, easy to use index helps to locate specific subjects, tribes, persons, and places within these documents. The second set of data is the Allotment Data Collection. Allotment was a process by which the government allowed most of the land base left to the Indians in the West to fall into other hands by the latter half of the 19th century. These tables trace the redistribution of Indian lands through land acquisition and agricultural data from the 1870s to the 1910s. This data set also includes full-text transcriptions of five significant acts of Congress regarding allotment that were passed between 1887 and 1910. The third data set includes 111 indexed documents that are housed in the Rogue River War and Siletz Reservation Collection. Among these 19th-century documents are letters received by the Office of Indian Affairs, newspaper editorials, and government reports. The site is indexed by subject, chronologically, and numerically by Project number. There is also a map of Oregon, ca. 1899, and a list of 19 suggested secondary works on allotment and homesteading. This site brings together some important documents on American Indian government policy for the purpose of undergraduate research and teaching.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-20.

www.history
Religion and the Founding of the American Republic
Library of Congress.
An exhibition of 212 written documents and visual images that explores the significance of religion for early American history. Includes manuscripts, letters, books, prints, paintings, artifacts, and music from the Library of Congress and other collections. The seven sections of the exhibition—each including a 500-word essay and annotations of 100 words in length for each object displayed—cover the following topics: religious persecution in Europe that led to emigration; religious experience in 18th-century America, including the Great Awakening of 1740–45; the influence of religious leaders and ideas on the War of Independence; policies toward religion of the Continental-Confederation Congress of 1774–89, state governments, and the new federal government; and evangelical movements of the early 19th century. “The efforts of the Founders of the American nation to define the role of religious faith in public life and the degree to which it could be supported by public officials that was not inconsistent with the revolutionary imperatives of the equality and freedom of all citizens is the central question which this exhibition explores.” The site provides archival commentary to all sources and will be useful to those studying early American history and print culture, and the history of religion.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-14.