home | many pasts | evidence | www.history | blackboard | reference
talking history | syllabi | students | teachers | puzzle | about us
search: go!
advanced search - go!

There are 181 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Making of America
University of Michigan.
See JAH web review by Tobias Higbie.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This site is a “digital library” of thousands of primary documents in American social history from the Antebellum period through Reconstruction. The result of a collaborative project between the University of Michigan and Cornell University, begun in 1995, it currently offers more than 3 million pages of text from 11,063 volumes and 50,000 journal articles. Includes 10 major 19th-century journals—like Appleton’s from 1869 to 1881, the Southern Literary Messenger from 1835 to 1864, Ladies Repository from 1841 to 1876, and DeBow’s from 1846 to 1869 — as well as novels and tracts important for understanding the development of American education, sociology, history, religion, psychology, and science. A recent addition includes 249 volumes on New York City, some from the early 20th century. Searchable by word or phrase, the site provides a complete bibliography of books and journals, organized by author. Well-designed and executed, this is an excellent collection of material.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Do History: Martha Ballard’s Diary Online
Film Study Center, Harvard University.
See JAH web review by Jane Kamensky.
Reviewed 2001-06-01.
Developed by the Film Study Center at Harvard University, this site is an experimental, interactive case study that explores the remarkable 18th-century diary of midwife Martha Ballard. The site demonstrates how historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich pieced together the diary within a broader historical context to write the book A Midwife’s Tale and offers a behind-the-scenes tour with filmmaker Laurie Kahn-Leavitt on the making of the film version, also called A Midwife’s Tale. The site offers two versions of the 1400-page diary, facsimile and transcribed full-text; the latter is searchable by keyword and date. An archive offers images of nearly 50 documents on such topics as Ballard’s life, domestic life, law and justice, finance and commerce, geography and surveying, midwifery and birth, medical information, religion, and Maine history. It is searchable by document type, topic, author, and title. Also included are maps of North America (1795), Maine (1799), and Hallowell, Maine (1794); images of Augusta and Hallowell Maine; and a walking tour of Hallowell, Maine. A timeline traces Maine’s history from the first attempt to settle the coastline in 1607, through Ballard’s lifetime (1735–1812), to the 1997 release of the film A Midwife’s Tale. Interactive exercises offer students the opportunity to transcribe and “decode” portions of the diary, and a “Magic Lens” makes it appear as if Ballard’s handwriting is instantly transcribed. A drop-down menu offers suggestions on ways to use the site for conducting research on genealogy, midwifery and herbal medicine, and diaries, as well as for using primary sources. Of particular interest is a section on teaching with this Website, which includes 15 ideas for classroom activities and suggestions on how to customize the activities for different grade levels, as well as links to the teacher guides developed for the PBS film. 2 “Doing History” exercises allow visitors to build a story around Ballard’s notes about 2 controversies. The “On Your Own” section helps “beginning historians” organize and conduct research with ten 500- to 750-word essays describing the stages of a research project and offering step-by-step instructions on cultivating such research skills as reading 18th-century writing, reading probate records, searching for deeds, and exploring graveyards. There are also links to 5 additional Websites with further how-to information, a bibliography of over 125 related scholarly works, and 50 related websites. This rich site provides students and teachers with an ideal case study of the work involved in “piecing together the past.”
Listen to the audio review based on the JAH web review by Jane Kamensky:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-24.

www.history
America’s First Look into the Camera: Daguerreotype Portraits and Views, 1839–1864
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Paula Petrik.
Reviewed 2010-09-01.
This collection contains more than 725 photographs, most of them daguerreotypes produced at the Mathew Brady studio. The Brady images include portraits of prominent public figures, including President James K. Polk, Thomas Hart Benton, Thomas Cole, and Horace Greeley. The collection also includes the earliest known images of President and Mrs. Abraham Lincoln. Those not produced by the Brady studio daguerreotypes by African-American photographers, a few early architectural views taken in the Washington, D.C.-Baltimore area by John Plumbe, street scenes of Philadelphia, early portraits by Robert Cornelius, and copies of painted portraits. A short introduction to the daguerreotype medium and a “Timeline of the Daguerrian Era” provide additional context for the images. A special presentation, “Mirror Images: Daguerreotypes at the Library of Congress,” includes photographs from the American Colonization Society, occupational daguerreotypes, portraits, and architectural views. Useful for those studying 19th-century photography, visual culture, or art, as well as for viewing some of the earliest American photographs.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
Center for History and New Media
Center for History and New Media, George Mason University .
In the past decade new media and new technologies have begun to transform even the ancient discipline of history. CD-ROMs and the World Wide Web challenge historians to rethink the ways that they research, write, present, and teach about the past. The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) was established in the fall of 1994 to contribute to and reflect upon this transformation and challenge. The Center produces historical works in new media, tests the effectiveness of these products in the classroom, and reflects critically on the promises and pitfalls of new media in historical practice. The Center’s resources are designed to benefit professional historians, high school teachers, and students of history. Includes eight essays on the use of new technology in history teaching; announcements and reports on current projects; reviews of recent CD-ROMs; links to more than 1,000 history departments around the world, more than 1,500 history websites, and more than 200 CD-Roms; and six syllabi for George Mason University history courses. “Hypertext Scholarship in American Studies” includes four articles demonstrating uses of hypertext in scholarly contexts. Declaration: Interpreting the Declaration of Independence by Translation provides translations of the American Declaration of Independence into French, German, Polish, Russian, and Spanish, along with commentaries on the practice and problems of translating documents. The site also includes the electronic journal “English Matters,” designed for teachers and students of English. With the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning at the City University of New York (ASHP/CML), CHNM produces "History Matters."
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2002-10-28.

www.history
Around the World in the 1890s: Photographs from the World’s Transportation Commission, 1894–1896
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This photo archive contains over 900 images made by American photographer William Henry Jackson (1843–1942) during an 1890’s tour of North Africa, Asia, Australia, and Oceania. The World’s Transportation Commission, an organization formed to aid American business interests abroad, commissioned Jackson. The photographs, originally exhibited in Chicago’s Field Columbian Museum, focus on transportation systems—especially railroads—tourist sites, indigenous life, and locations of natural beauty. Nearly 687 of the images are from lantern slides, many of which were hand-colored. Many of the photographs appeared in Harper’s Weekly. This collection is valuable for those interested in late-19th-century photography and American views of exotic places.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-27.

www.history
New York Public Library Digital Gallery
New York Public Library.
This massive collection presents more than 550,000 images relevant to both U.S. and world history, from the earliest days of print culture to the present. These images consist primarily of historical maps, posters, prints and photographs, illuminated manuscript pages, and images drawn from published books. For browsing, the materials are divided by subject heading, library of origin, the name of the item’s creator and/or publisher, and by collection: Arts & Literature; Cities & Building; Culture & Society; History & Geography; Industry & Technology; Nature & Science; and Printing & Graphics. Within these broad collection headings, the images are further subdivided into more specific groupings, for example, Indonesian dance, dress and fashion, Civil War medical care, and New York City apartment buildings. Keyword and Advanced Search options are useful for those wishing to locate specific items. All images can be downloaded for personal use and are accompanied by detailed biographic information, though users will have to turn elsewhere for further historical context.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Inventing Entertainment: The Early Motion Pictures and Sound Recordings of the Edison Companies
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Elena Razlogova.
Reviewed 2006-12-01.
This excellent site features 341 motion pictures, 81 disc sound recordings, and other related materials, such as photographs and original magazine articles documenting Thomas Edison’s corporate impact on the history of American entertainment. Thomas Alva Edison (1847–1931)—prolific inventor, manufacturer, and businessman—patented 1,093 inventions, including the phonograph, the kinetograph (a motion picture camera), and the kinetoscope (a motion picture viewer). All are searchable by keyword, title, or subject; movies are presented in QuickTime, Mpeg and RealMedia formats and a capsule description of each film is provided. Special pages focus on the life of the great inventor and histories of Edison’s contribution to motion picture and sound recording technologies. Part of the American Memory Collection at the Library of Congress, drawn from collections in the Library of Congress Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
SCETI: Schoenberg Center for Electronic Text and Image
University of Pennsylvania Special Collections Library.
These eclectic special collection materials span the 17th to the 20th centuries. Visitors can search material from nine collections and visit 14 exhibitions. The collection “A Crisis of the Union” on the Civil War presents 224 pamphlets, broadsides, clippings, paintings, and maps to address the “causes, conduct, and consequences” of the war. A collection devoted to Theodore Dreiser presents correspondence, variant editions of the novel Sister Carrie, an early manuscript for Jennie Gerhardt, and scholarly essays. A collection of approximately 4,000 photographs from singer Marian Anderson’s papers is complemented by an exhibit that includes more than 40 audio and video recordings. A collection on the history of chemistry emphasizes the pre-1850 period with monographs on chemistry and alchemy, and more than 3,000 prints and photographs of scientists, laboratories, and apparatus. The Robert and Molly Freedman archive of Jewish Music recordings includes 26,000 catalog entries in English, Yiddish, and Hebrew and six sample recordings. Exhibits celebrate the work of Eugene Ormandy and Leopold Stokowski. Women’s history is represented by the diaries of five American and one English woman written between 1850 and 1909. Diaries range from one to 30 years and are both indexed by date and available for reading as text. An exhibit titled “Household Words” presents writing by women about food from the 15th to the 20th century. An exhibit on the colonization of the Americas as it appeared in print presents illustrations, maps, and manuscripts from the age of exploration. The site also includes an exhibit on the development of the ENIAC computer and a selection of 49 works from the University of Pennsylvania’s art museum. he English Renaissance in Context (ERIC) provides tutorials and a database of texts to help students analyze Shakespearean works and plays.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps of South Carolina
University of South Carolina Libraries Digital Collections.
See JAH web review by John M. Sherrer and Helena Ferguson.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
The 580 maps of more than 80 South Carolina towns and cities in this archive reveal urban landscapes and the locations of businesses, mills, colleges, depots, and other buildings between 1884 and 1923. The collection includes 232 unpublished, hand-drafted maps from the years 1899 to 1937. All maps are displayed with original color coding. Users can zoom in and out of maps and can pan right, left, up, or down to examine details. Every map is accompanied by bibliographic data. The full collection can be browsed or the user can choose to browse just the unpublished maps. The collection can be searched by city, year of publication, and county. The maps provide many details about mills and are particularly useful in revealing spatial relationships and location of railroad lines. There is also a link to the Union List of Sanborn and other fire insurance maps. An extremely useful resource for those researching the business or urban history of South Carolina in the decades around 1900.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Lost Museum
ASHP/CML and New Media Lab, CUNY and CHNM, George Mason University.
See JAH web review by Timothy J. Gilfoyle.
Reviewed 2011-09-01.
This site recreates in cyberspace P. T. Barnum’s American Museum, which burned down under mysterious circumstances in 1865 after enjoying nearly a quarter century of patronage. The original Museum, known for its attempt to both entertain and educate, contained exhibits touching on natural history, history, and reform efforts along with attractions of a more sensational nature. With the exception of African Americans, who were barred from the Museum until the Civil War, New Yorkers of diverse ethnic, gender, and class identities mingled in the Museum’s shared cultural space. Visitors to the recreation may currently browse or search 16 archives that provide images, facsimiles of documents, contemporary accounts, and explanatory essays on original Barnum exhibits, including the Fejee Mermaid, “Swedish Nightingale” Jenny Lind, the National Baby Show, “Star of the East” Zalumma Agra, Phrenology, the 1864 Conspiracy to disrupt New York City elections, and Joice Heth, a former slave whom Barnum advertised as having been George Washington’s nursemaid. The site allows visitors to immerse themselves in the popular culture of Barnum’s era.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-27.

www.history
Phillip Morris Advertising Archive
Philip Morris Incorporated.
See JAH web review by Pamela Walker Laird.
Reviewed 2003-09-01.
More than 55,000 color images of tobacco advertisements from litigated cases, dating back to 1909, are now available on this site, created as a stipulation of the Master Settlement Agreement between the tobacco industry and various states’ attorneys general. In addition, more than 26 million pages of documents concerning “research, manufacturing, marketing, advertising and sales of cigarettes, among other topics” are provided in linked sites to the four tobacco companies involved—Philip Morris, R. J. Reynolds, Lorillard, and Brown and Williamson—and to two industry organizations, the Tobacco Institute and the Council for Tobacco Research. Ads and documents can be accessed by date, brand name, title words, and persons mentioned, among other searchable fields. Images can be magnified and rotated. An important site for those studying the historical uses of advertising to promote smoking and those with a more general interest in some of the motifs in ad texts and images that have become part of 20th-century American life.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
City Sites: Multimedia Essays on New York and Chicago, 1870s-1930s
University of Birmingham and University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
An “electronic book,” composed of 10 multimedia essays by European and American scholars on modern urban culture in New York and Chicago. Hyperlinks allow readers to navigate thematically between essays. Ranging in length from 6,000 to 12,000 words, these essays explicitly use recent literary theory to explore urban landscapes, representations, and history. Visitors may follow particular “pathways” across essays for topics relating to architecture, leisure, race, and space. The New York essays deal with the following subjects: Harlem as refuge and ghetto in modernist art and writing; Times Square as represented in New Year’s celebrations; modern ways of seeing revealed in images of the Flatiron Building; an examination of the work of architectural illustrator Hugh Ferris in order to uncover “ways in which the modern imagination expressed itself through architectural discourse”; and tensions between turn-of-the-century representations of the Lower East Side by reformers and others. Chicago essays cover the portrayal of African-American urban styles in the art of Archibald Motley, Jr.; ways the city has been represented as a “gateway”; how urban identities are constructed and experiences portrayed in the novel Sister Carrie; ways that racial difference has been iterated in various discursive fields to shape national identity; and Maxwell Street as a site where urban renewal has displaced distinctive ethnic neighborhood cultures. Essays include dozens of photographs and multimedia displays. Includes a bibliography of more than 400 titles. As a demonstration of “ways in which new multimedia technologies can enhance conventional scholarly understandings of urban culture,” this site may represent the shape of things to come in some scholarly fields. Part of The 3Cities Project (see separate “History Matters” entry for description of larger site).
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2001-09-14.

www.history
Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] Home for a membership organization of more than 500 colleges and universities worldwide, this site provides “access to a vast archive of social science data for research and instruction.” Data offered is in a variety of sociological and political areas, including census enumerations; urban and community studies; conflict, violence, and wars; economic behavior; legal systems; legislative bodies; mass political behavior and attitudes; and organizational behavior. While much of the site emphasizes the late twentieth century, data sets such as “Historical and Contemporary Electoral Processes” and “1790–1960 Censuses” will be useful to studies of earlier periods. Includes five special topic archives with data in linked sites geared to health, education, aging, criminal justice, and substance abuse and mental health concerns. Also provides 45 links to related sites. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social and political history. The site plans in the future to introduce “a set of pages that focuses on the needs and interests of novice data users.”
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-22.

www.history
Kentuckiana Digital Library
Kentucky Virtual Library.
Provides a wealth of historical material from 15 Kentucky colleges, universities, libraries, and historical societies. Includes nearly 8,000 photographs; 95 full-text books, manuscripts, and journals, from 1784 to 1971; 94 oral history interviews; 78 issues of the magazine Mountain Life & Work, from 1925–62; and 22 issues of the publication Works Progress Administration in Kentucky: Narrative Reports, covering 1935–37. Includes photographic collections of renowned photographer Russell Lee, who documented health conditions resulting from coal industry practices; Roy Stryker, head of the Farm Security Administration photographic project; and others that provide images of a variety of cities, towns, schools, camps, and disappearing cultures. Presents oral histories pertaining to Supreme Court Justice Stanley F. Reed, U.S. Senator John Sherman Cooper, the Frontier Nursing Service, American military veterans, Appalachian fiddlers, and the transition of an area from farming to an industrial economy. Texts include Civil War diaries, religious tracts, speeches, correspondence, and scrapbooks. Includes documents on colonization societies, civil rights, education, railroads, feuding, the Kentucky Derby, exploits of Daniel Boone, pioneer surgery, and a recollection of Abraham Lincoln. Valuable for those studying changes in the social and cultural history of the state.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Thomas Jefferson Digital Archive
University of Virginia Library.
See JAH web review by Robert M. S. McDonald.
Reviewed 2004-12-01.
Provides more than 1,700 texts—correspondence, books, addresses, and a variety of public papers—written by or to Thomas Jefferson. Most texts are presented in transcribed, word-searchable format; 18 appear as color images of original manuscripts. The site also includes a biography of Jefferson written in 1834, eight years after his death. The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia, published in 1900, organizes more than 9,000 quotes according to theme and other categories. A collection of 2,700 excerpts from Jefferson’s writings present his political philosophy. A wealth of searchable bibliographic listings is provided, including two previously published volumes and thousands of additional bibliographic references. Also contains a recent dissertation on the construction of the Jefferson-designed University of Virginia (UVA), listings from the Oxford English Dictionary that show Jefferson’s influence on English language usage, and four links to UVA exhibitions on Jefferson. Extremely valuable for the study of Jefferson and the period of the early republic.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-23.

www.history
Ohio Memory: An Online Scrapbook of Ohio History
Ohio Memory Project.
See JAH web review by Susan E. Gray.
Reviewed 2003-12-01.
In honor of the state of Ohio’s bicentennial in 2003, this site was created to digitize and make accessible extensive collections residing in a variety of Ohio archives, libraries, museums, and local historical societies. At present, more than 330 Ohio institutions have contributed more than 4,100 collections covering Ohio life, culture, and history from prehistoric times to 1903. Currently the site provides more than 26,000 images: 2,786 audiovisual items; 768 historical objects, artifacts, buildings, or sites; 106 natural history specimens; 809 published works; and 691 collections of unpublished material. Users can search by word, date, or place, and browse by format, place, subject heading, or institution. Displayed materials are presented chronologically on scrapbook pages with 9 selections per page. The site provides descriptions and cataloging information for each entry, including links to related sites. Visitors can zoom into individual images for close inspection and create their own annotated scrapbook for future use. The site includes a “Learning Resources” section with 22 categories, including African Americans, agriculture, American Indians, arts and entertainment, business and labor, civil liberties, daily life, education, immigration and ethnic heritage, government, religion, science and technology, sports, and women. This section provides essays of up to 2,000 words illustrated with relevant material. Objects range from 500,000,000-year-old fossils to a 19th-century amputating kit to a 161-page book of poems by a Youngstown steel worker known as the “Puddler Poet.” Valuable for those looking to understand a wide variety of historical topics from a local or regional perspective.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
First American West: The Ohio River Valley, 1750–1820
American Memory, Library of Congress; University of Chicago Library; and Filson Historical Society.
Provides approximately 15,000 pages of historical published and unpublished manuscript material related to the migration of Europeans west into the Ohio River Valley during the latter half of the 18th century and beginning of the 19th. Includes books, pamphlets, newspapers, periodicals, journals, letters, legal documents, pictorial images, maps, ledgers, and other types of material. The collection, from the University of Chicago Library and Filson Historical Society of Louisville, Kentucky, was started in the late 19th century by a group dedicated to preserving documents related to Kentucky and Ohio River Valley history. The site includes a special presentation with a 6,500-word hyperlink-filled essay arranged into five sections on contested lands, peoples and migration, empires and politics, Western life and culture, and the construction of a Western past. The site offers materials on encounters between Europeans and native peoples, the lives of African-American slaves in the area, the role of institutions such as churches and schools, the position of women in this society, the thoughts of naturalists and other scientists, and activities of the migrants, including travel, land acquisition, planting, navigation of rivers, and trade. Well-known personages represented include Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr, James Madison, and William Henry Harrison. Includes a 26-title bibliography and annotated links to 19 related sites. Valuable for students and serious researchers of early American history, the history of cross-cultural encounters in the West, frontier history, and the construction of the nation’s past.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-19.

www.history
Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection
Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia.
The U.S. Army Yellow Fever Commission demonstrated in 1900 that the mosquito transmitted yellow fever. This archive is an extensive compilation of 5,500 items related to the Commission’s findings. Documents span from 1850 to 1966 and include correspondence, reports, photographs, and artifacts. The site is organized into sections pertaining to six key individuals: Walter Reed, Jesse W. Lazear, Henry Rose Carter, Jefferson Randolph Kean, Albert E. Truby, and Philip S. Hench. Each section includes an introduction (800 to 1,000 words) and is searchable by date, series, subject, or keyword. In addition, there is a 4,800-word essay entitled “United States Army Yellow Fever Commission.” The Walter Reed Series (1874–1936) and the Reed Family Additions (1877–1902) comprise Reed’s original letters concerning his seminal work with yellow fever in Cuba. The Jesse Lazear Series and Henry Rose Carter Series, which span from the 1860s to 1930s detail the men’s involvement with the Yellow Fever Commission in Cuba and their careers in public health. The other series include personal and professional correspondence and research during the period of the Yellow Fever Commission’s work in Cuba. A separate section entitled "Reed Biographies" contains a first edition biography of Walter Reed and a 1941 version of Walter Reed, Doctor in Uniform, a biography for young adults. "Highlights" comprises a sampling of 30 unique documents, many of which comment on the importance of the Cuban American relationship. Those interested in exploring the history of medicine and science, social history, military history, public health policy, tropical medicine, and biomedical ethics will find this site of great interest.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
University of Nebraska Press; Center for Great Plains Studies; UNL Libraries.
See JAH web review by Leonard J. Sadosky.
Reviewed 2009-06-01.
This well-designed site presents the “celebrated Nebraska edition of the Lewis and Clark journals,” edited by Gary E. Moulton, providing the complete text of all the journals from the 1803 to 1806 expedition, as well as introductions, prefaces, and sources. The material is searchable by keyword and phrase. There are 29 scholarly essays about the expedition. An image gallery offers more than 124 images of pages from the journals, 95 images of people and places, and 50 images of plants and animals encountered on the expedition. The maps section includes 12 explanatory maps and 9 images of maps from the journals. Additionally, there are 27 audio excerpts of journal readings and 8 video interviews with the editor of the project. An outstanding resource for researching the history of the Lewis and Clark expedition.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-03.

www.history
NOVA: Einstein’s Big Idea
WGBH and PBS.
This companion website to a PBS NOVA documentary contains information about Einstein and his theory of relativity, as well as several special features. The site offers a timeline of Einstein’s life from his birth in 1879 to his death in 1955, a short essay on his life before his great discovery in 1905, and an explanation of the theory behind the equation. Special features include: an essay on the legacy of Einstein’s theories of special relativity and general relativity and how they affect our world; a feature exploring time dilation as predicted by Einstein’s theory of relativity; and an audio feature in which 10 top physicists briefly describe Einstein’s equatio. The site also offers two teacher guides: “Einstein’s Big Idea” and “Einstein Revealed,” 10 links to related websites, and a bibliography of eight books. Though it contains no primary source material, this site should be useful for science teachers and high school students studying Einstein, physics, and the history of science.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Business Plan Archive
Library of Congress; Center for History and New Media; University of Maryland Libraries.
A collection of business plans and planning information, this archive documents the “Birth of the Dot Com Era.“ Documents can be browsed (free registration required) by alphabetical listing of companies, document type, market sector, or market audience, or the archive can be searched by company name. An advanced search option is also available. Currently, there are 2,445 companies in the archive with one or more documents and more than 3,400 archived documents. Each company record includes a brief description of the company, historical information on the company (if available), and related documents. ”What We Can Learn“ offers three articles on the kinds of observations we can extract from the dot com boom and bust. ”Research Corner" offers tips on using the archive in the classroom, announcements, and other project news. Of particular interest are the entries on guidelines and recommendations for studying companies and for using the archive.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2007-11-06.

www.history
Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Georgia Towns and Cities, 1884–1922
Digital Library of Georgia .
See JAH web review by John M. Sherrer and Helena Ferguson.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
This extensive archive offers detailed color maps for more than 130 Georgia towns and cities between 1884 and 1922. The maps reveal urban landscapes and the locations of businesses, mills, colleges, depots, and other buildings. There are 540 sets of maps and most sets have several or more map sheets. For instance, Atlanta for 1911 has 395 map sheets covering the entire city with three index maps and Savannah for 1916 has 137 map sheets with two index maps. All maps are displayed with their original color coding. Users can zoom in and out and pan right, left, up, or down to reveal details and every map is accompanied by full bibliographic data. Visitors can browse the collection by county or city or by year of publication or they can search by keyword, title, city, county, or by address in listed cities. An advanced search feature is also available. Maps for each city are grouped by year with holdings indicated. There are also 17 related links that include two sites on how to read Sanborn maps and seven other digitized collections of Sanborn maps. The maps provide many details about the mills and other industries in these towns, and they are particularly useful in revealing spatial relationships and location of railroad lines. An extremely useful resource for researching the business or urban history of Georgia in the decades around 1900.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Selling the Computer Revolution: Marketing Brochures in the Collection
Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California.
A collection of more than 250 computer marketing brochures from 1948 to 1988, this collection visually represents more than 90 companies. Visitors can explore the entire collection or browse by company. Categories include: calculators, mainframes, minicomputers, personal computers, supercomputers; applications for which the computer was intended; and decade. Of particular interest are 6 early marketing brochures from Apple Computer, a brochure for the Commodore 64 computer, and two mid-1950s IBM brochures for “electronic data processing machines.” Each group of brochures is accompanied by a brief introduction with historical information about the company, category, type of application, or decade. A keyword search is also available. The full contents of each brochure are available for viewing or download in PDF format and each brochure is accompanied by descriptive data. This collection is of interest to those researching or teaching the history of science and technology or the history of marketing.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-07.

www.history
Early American Newspapers: Series 1, 1690–1876
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This archive provides full-text access to more than 350,000 issues of more than 700 newspapers from 23 states and the District of Columbia. The majority of the collection focuses on the 18th and 19th centuries, and sheds light onto a wide range of political, social, cultural, and economic issues in both cities and smaller communities. The New York collection, for example, boasts 157 titles. While 80 of these were published in New York City, the collection also includes newspapers published in Troy, Utica, Catskill, and Ithaca. Massachusetts (137 titles), Pennsylvania (84 titles), Connecticut (47 titles), and Vermont (41 titles) are also well represented, followed by New Hampshire, Maryland, Virginia, South Carolina, and Rhode Island. Keyword searching capabilities combined with extensive browsing options allow both experienced researchers and those largely unfamiliar with early American history to make good use of the resources available here. Browsing options include dates and eras, article types (including news; poetry/songs; advertisements; birth, death, and marriage notices; cartoons and illustrations; maps; letters; and election returns), languages, places of publication, and newspaper titles. Newspapers are displayed as full-page scans, enabled with detailed zoom capabilities, and can be downloaded in .pdf format.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2009-07-30.

www.history
U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 1817–1980
Readex, NewsBank, Inc..
[SUBSCRIPTION REQUIRED] This vast archive includes many documents and reports produced by the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives and published between 1817 and 1980, for a total of more than 355,000 items. These items include 48,000 maps, 9,000 illustrations, thousands of reports, and numerous records of committee hearings and floor proceedings. All items are full-text searchable and can be browsed by subject, such as education, economics, food and agriculture, health, Indian affairs, armed forces and conflicts, environment and natural resources, and social issues. Within each of these broad categories, there are hundreds of subject headings, such as “animal welfare” (83 items), “alien labor” (306 items), and “ordnance testing” (353 items). The “Indian Affairs” category, for example, presents thousands of items on agencies and organizations relating to Indian affairs, Indian reservations, treaties, names of Indian tribes, as well as documents relating to hundreds of laws and supreme court cases. There is also a bill number search, an alphabetical list of names of all acts of Congress, and a listing of all documents by U.S. Congress session. All documents can be downloaded in .pdf format. In addition, a separate browse feature entitled “Serial Set Maps” facilitates access to thousands of maps from counties and cities across the country. Many of these date to the Civil War-era or later and include images of forts and depictions of field operations. Readex plans to expand coverage through 1994.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-08-19.

www.history
The American Image: The Photographs of John Collier Jr.
Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico.
In 1941, the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information (FSA/OWI) hired photographer John Collier Jr. to document ordinary life in America, focusing on civil defense and public morale. This website presents more than 300 of the photographs Collier took for this two-year assignment. These photographs span the country from New Mexico to Maine, and portray farm work, family life, industrial works, military recruitment and training, cityscapes, mining and other labor, religious and leisure activities, schooling, as well as Native American communities. To complement these photographs, the website also includes several interactive activities. “Active Looking” is a guided examination of photographs that pushes users to think about the authorship, composition, and purpose of photographs. In “The Shooting Script,” users compare one of Collier’s photographs to a contemporary photograph with a similar subject, learning about the importance of historical context and the photographer’s process. “Propaganda Filmmaker” allows users to make their own short film using Collier’s photographs as well as posters and video clips from other websites. A teacher’s guide for all activities is also available.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-10.

www.history
Medicine and Madison Avenue
Ellen Gartrell, National Humanities Center, and Digital Scriptorium, Duke University .
This exhibit is designed to help users better understand the evolution and complexity of health-related marketing in the 20th century. The project contains two different kinds of historical sources: a selection of more than 600 health-related advertisements printed in newspapers and magazines from 1910 to 1960 and supplementary documents. The advertisements have been organized around 6 categories: Household Products (45 items); Over-the-Counter Drugs (194 items); Personal and Oral Hygiene (184 items); Vitamins and Tonics, Food, Nutrition and Diet Aids (157 items); Institutional and Pharmaceutical (43 items); and Cigarette Ads (1 item). The 35 supplementary text documents include scanned images of internal reports from marketing companies, American Medical Association reports and editorials, Federal Trade Commission archival records, transcripts of 1930s radio commercials, and articles from medical journals. The project is designed for teachers and students in secondary schools, universities, and medical and public health programs. There are suggestions for how to use these primary documents in the classroom, including materials for case studies on Fleischmann’s Yeast, Listerine, and Scott Tissue. Users will also find the 85-item bibliography beneficial. This is an essential site for anyone interested in the history of modern advertising and modern medicine.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-24.