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There are 202 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30 .


www.history
American Memory: Historical Collections for the National Digital Library
Library of Congress, American Memory.
This expansive archive of American history and culture features photographs, prints, motion pictures, manuscripts, printed books, pamphlets, maps, and sound recordings going back to roughly 1490. Currently this site includes more than 9 million digital items from more than 100 collections on subjects ranging from African-American political pamphlets to California folk music, from baseball to the Civil War. Most topical sites include special presentations introducing particular depositories or providing historical context for archival materials. Visitors can search collections separately or all at once by keyword and type of source (photos and prints, documents, films, sound recordings, or maps). In addition, the Learning Page provides well-organized help for using the collections, including sample teaching assignments. WWW.History includes individual annotations for many of the current collections.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936–1940
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Thomas Thurston.
Reviewed 2001-09-01.
Approximately 2,900 life histories from 1936–1940 compiled and transcribed as part of the Federal Writers' Project for the U.S. Works Progress (later Work Projects) Administration (WPA)are featured on this site. Documents represent the work of more than 300 writers from 24 states. The histories, in the form of drafts and revisions, vary from narrative to dialog, report, or case history. A typical history describes an informant’s family, education, income, occupation, political views, religion and mores, medical needs, diet, and other observations on society and culture. Interviewers often substituted pseudonyms for names of individuals and places. The Special Presentation, “Voices from the Thirties”—adapted in part from the book First Person America by Ann Banks and illustrated with photographs of the Project’s staff at work, interviewees, and their environments—provides the context for the creation of the Life Histories Collection and includes excerpts from sample interviews. Visitors can select a particular U.S. state or search the archive by keyword. Life histories are presented in facsimiles of original interview documents and as searchable text. This multifaceted collection provides materials for teaching subjects such as slavery and 19th-century American folk cultures as well as social history of the Great Depression.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-25.

www.history
America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA-OWI, 1935–1945
American Memory, Library of Congress.
More than 160,000 images taken by government photographers with the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and the Office of War Information (OWI) during the New Deal and World War II eras are featured on this site. These images document the ravages of the Great Depression on farmers, scenes of everyday life in small towns and cities, and, in later years, mobilization campaigns for World War II. This site includes approximately 1,600 color photographs and selections from 2 extremely popular collections: “’Migrant Mother’ Photographs” and “Photographs of Signs Enforcing Racial Discrimination.” The site also provides a bibliography, a background essay of about 500 words, seven short biographical sketches of FSA-OWI photographers, links to 7 related sites, and 3 essays on cataloging and digitizing the collection. The photographs are searchable by keyword and arranged into a subject index.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
California Gold: Northern California Folk Music from the Thirties
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site features 35 hours of folk and popular music sound recordings from several European, Slavic, Middle Eastern, and English- and Spanish-speaking communities. The Work Projects Administration California Folk Music Project collected these 817 songs, in 12 languages and representing 185 musicians, in Northern California between 1938 and 1940. The collection also includes 168 photographs of musicians, 45 scale drawings and sketches of instruments, and numerous written documents, including ethnographic field reports and notes, song transcriptions, published articles, and project correspondence. Organized by folk music collector Sidney Robertson Cowell, sponsored by the University of California, Berkeley, and cosponsored by the Archive of the American Folk Song, this was one of the earliest ethnographic field projects to document folk and popular music of such diverse origin in one region. In addition to folk music of indigenous and immigrant groups, the collection includes popular songs from the Gold Rush and Barbary Coast eras, medicine show tunes, and ragtime numbers. In addition, short essays describe the California Folk Music Project and the ethnographic work of Sidney Robertson Cowell. This collection is an excellent resource for learning about ethnographic research practices as well as about cultures of various California ethnic groups.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-14.

www.history
California as I Saw It: First-Person Narratives of California’s Early Years, 1849–1900
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by William E. Brown, Jr..
Reviewed 2002-09-01.
The 190 works presented on this site—approximately 40,000 written pages and more than 3,000 illustrations—provide eyewitness accounts covering California history from the Gold Rush through the end of the 19th century. Most authors represented are white, educated, male Americans, including reporters detailing Gold Rush incidents and visitors from the 1880s attracted to a highly-publicized romantic vision of California life. The narratives, in the form of diaries, descriptions, guidebooks, and subsequent reminiscences, portray “pioneer experience, encounters between Anglo-Americans and the diverse peoples who had preceded them, the transformation of the land by mining, ranching, agriculture, and urban development; the often-turbulent growth of communities and cities; and California’s emergence as both a state and a place of uniquely American dreams.” A map of California from 1900, texts, 20 illustrations and photographs, a bibliography for further reading, and a comprehensive discussion of the collection’s strengths and weaknesses provide useful context for first-person accounts. A special presentation recounts early California history illustrated with paintings, engravings, and photographs.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-01.

www.history
Touring Turn-of-the-Century America: Photographs from the Detroit Publishing Company, 1880–1920
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Marguerite S. Shaffer.
Reviewed 2004-07-01.
The Detroit Publishing Company was a mass producer of photographic images—especially color postcards, prints, and albums—for the American market from the late 1890s to 1924, the year it went into receivership. This collection of more than 25,000 glass negatives and transparencies and about 300 color photolithograph prints also includes images taken prior to the establishment of the company by landscape photographer William Henry Jackson, who joined the company in 1897 and became its president the following year. Jackson’s earlier work documenting western sites influenced the conservation movement and influenced the establishment of various national parks, including Yellowstone. Although many images in this collection were taken in eastern locations, other areas of the U.S., the Americas, and Europe are represented. The collection specializes in views of buildings, streets, colleges, universities, natural landmarks, resorts, and copies of paintings. More than 300 photographs were taken in Cuba during the period of the Spanish-American War. About 900 Mammoth Plate Photographs include views taken by Jackson of Hopi peoples and their crafts, landscapes along several railroad lines in the United States and Mexico in the 1880s and 1890s, and at other sites in California and Wyoming; and by Henry Greenwood Peabody of the Canadian Rockies.
Resources Available: IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-10-02.

www.history
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence: History & Social Studies
U.S. Department of Education.
This megasite brings together resources for teaching U.S. and world history from the far corners of the web. Most of these websites boast large collections of primary sources from the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian, the National Archives and Records Administration, and prominent universities. There are more than 600 websites listed for U.S. history alone, divided by time period and topic: Business & Work, Ethnic Groups, Famous People, Government, Movements, States & Regions, Wars, and Other Social Studies. While most of these websites are either primary source archives (for example, History of the American West, 1860–1920) or virtual exhibits, many offer lesson plans and ready-made student activities, such as EDSITEment, created by the National Endowment for the Humanities. A good place to begin is the (Subject Map), which lists resources by sub-topic, including African Americans (67 resources), Women’s History (37 resources), and Natural Disasters (16 resources). Each resource is accompanied by a brief annotation that facilitates quick browsing.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
South Texas Border, 1900–1920: Photographs from the Robert Runyon Collection
American Memory, Library of Congress and University of Texas, Austin.
See JAH web review by Neil Foley.
Reviewed 2003-03-01.
A collection featuring the life’s work of commercial photographer Robert Runyon (1881–1968), totalling more than 8,000 images, that document the history and development of South Texas and the border, including the U.S. military presence in the area prior to and during World War I and the growth and development of the Rio Grande Valley in the early 1900s. A special section presents nine of Runyon’s 350 photographs of the Mexican Revolution (1910–20) in Matamoros, Monterrey, Ciudad Victoria, and the Texas border area from 1913 through 1916. Includes a 900-word essay on the Revolution and a 1,100-word biographical essay on Runyon. An Ameritech Award Winner. Of use to those studying the history of documentary photography, images of the Mexican Revolution, and Texas history.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-12-04.

www.history
Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota.
See JAH web review by Joel Perlmann.
Reviewed 2003-06-01.
Currently provides 22 census data samples and 65 million records from 13 federal censuses covering the period 1850–1990. These data “collectively comprise our richest source of quantitative information on long-term changes in the American population.” The project has applied uniform codes to previously published and newly created data samples. Rather than offering data in aggregated tabular form, the site offers data on individuals and households, allowing researchers to tailor tabulations to their specific interests. Includes data on fertility, marriage, immigration, internal migration, work, occupational structure, education, ethnicity, and household composition. Offers extensive documentation on procedures used to transform data and includes 13 links to other census-related sites. A complementary project to provide multiple data samples from every country from the 1960s to 2000 is underway. Currently this international series offers information and interpretive essays on Kenya, Vietnam, Mexico, Hungary, and Brazil. Of major importance for those doing serious research in social history, the site will probably be forbidding to novices.
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
Heading West & Touring West
New York Public Library.
See JAH web review by William D. Rowley.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
This site is home to two related exhibits about the exploration and settlement of the American west. “Heading West” is a collection of 15 maps produced between 1540 and 1900 and divided into five categories: imagining, exploring, settling, mining, and traveling. A 700-word essay introduces the exhibit and each image is accompanied by 50–400 words of explanation. The site links to 16 other sites about exploration and maps of the west. “Touring West” is a collection of materials about performers who toured the west in the 19th century. It is divided into five sections: travel, abolitionists, railroads, recitals, and heroics. Visitors will find 3 images in each section and 50–400 words of explanation. The images include prints and photographs of performers, programs, and promotional posters. An introductory essay of 500-words describes the collection. The site offers 15 links to sites about performance. Both exhibits will be useful to those interested in the west, performance, or search of illustrations.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Meeting of Frontiers
Library of Congress.
In conjunction with the Russian State Library in Moscow, the National Library of Russia in St. Petersburg, and the Rasmuson Library of the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, the Library of Congress has digitized more than 2,500 items, comprising approximately 70,000 images, and provided transcriptions and commentaries in English and Russian to offer a comparative history of American and Russian expansion through frontier territories in each nation’s continent. The site presents an overview of expansion into Siberia and the American West in six sections: Exploration, Colonization, Development, Alaska, Frontiers and National Identity, and Mutual Perceptions. Each section contains from two to 11 modules that call attention to similarities and differences between the two histories with regard to subjects such as migration—forced and otherwise, missionaries, religious flight, mining, railroads, agriculture, cities, popular culture, and tourism, and even compares Cossacks with cowboys. The site offers more than 40 complete books, including manuals, handbooks, fiction, and travelers accounts; 77 maps and one atlas; 438 items from the Russian-Ukrainian Pamphlet and Brochure Collection; materials from six complete manuscript collections, regarding exploration, trade, and commercial activities; four tour-of-the-century films; 125 newspaper articles; 11 dime novel covers; five photographic collections; and one sound recording of a Russian folk song. Provides a 500-title bibliography and links to 30 related sites. Valuable for those studying the American West and Russian history and investigating ways to explore frontiers of comparative histories in order to expand beyond limits of national history narratives.
Listen to the audio review:

Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Centennial Celebration
Bureau of the Census.
To celebrate the centennial of the Census Bureau, this site provides access to a wealth of statistical information on the U.S. population. While most materials offer recent data, more than 30 comprehensive reports and tables are included that track decade-by-decade demographic-related shifts, including urban and rural population change, population of the largest 100 cities, population density, and homeownership rates. Additional material details shifts in U.S. international trade in goods and services from 1960–2000; poverty from 1959–2000; race and Hispanic origin of foreign-born populations from 1850–1990; interracial married couples from 1960–1998; and marital status of women at first birth from 1930–1994. Visitors can find current detailed information on social and economic characteristics of African Americans, Hispanics and Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indian and Alaska Natives, and of baby boomers. The North American Industry Classification System offers recent economic data on eight business sectors. American FactFinder offers detailed maps with demographic information for individual blocks and for larger areas. Yearly editions of Statistical Abstract of the United States from 1995 to 2001 are included, along with charts of demographic information according to categories such as age, ancestry, and income. In addition, the site provides a collection of “fast facts” for each decade of the 20th century, four historical timelines, and approximately 20 photographs related to the census. Valuable for students and professional historians needing demographic and other statistical information on population trends.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2009-02-04.

www.history
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.
See JAH web review by Chauncey Monte-Sano.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This large, attractive site provides high-quality material on American history for historians and teachers. The collection contains more than 60,000 “rare and important” American historical documents from 1493 to 1998 includes more than 34,000 transcripts. Authors include George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln. Users can also search the complete database of the Institute’s collection. Each week an annotated, transcribed document is featured, and an archive contains eighty past featured documents. “Treasures of the collection” offers 24 highlighted documents and images. Six online exhibits cover topics such as Alexander Hamilton, the Dred Scott decision, Abraham Lincoln, and topics such as freedom and battles. Teaching modules cover more than 20 topics corresponding to major periods in American history, each with a historical overview, lesson plans, quizzes, primary source material, visual aids, and activities. Additional resources include links to historical documents, published scholarship, and general history resources on the web. There are also descriptions of the Institute’s public programs and summer seminars, essay contests, national book prizes, and awards for teachers and students.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
University of Nebraska Press; Center for Great Plains Studies; UNL Libraries.
See JAH web review by Leonard J. Sadosky.
Reviewed 2009-06-01.
This well-designed site presents the “celebrated Nebraska edition of the Lewis and Clark journals,” edited by Gary E. Moulton, providing the complete text of all the journals from the 1803 to 1806 expedition, as well as introductions, prefaces, and sources. The material is searchable by keyword and phrase. There are 29 scholarly essays about the expedition. An image gallery offers more than 124 images of pages from the journals, 95 images of people and places, and 50 images of plants and animals encountered on the expedition. The maps section includes 12 explanatory maps and 9 images of maps from the journals. Additionally, there are 27 audio excerpts of journal readings and 8 video interviews with the editor of the project. An outstanding resource for researching the history of the Lewis and Clark expedition.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-12-03.

www.history
Territorial Kansas Online
Kansas State Historical Society and University of Kansas.
See JAH web review by Michael D. Pierson.
Reviewed 2004-09-01.
This repository of Territorial Kansas collections convey the growing divisions in Kansas and the nation over the expansion of slavery, federalism, nationalism, industrialization of the North, and changing political coalitions in Congress. Users have access to government documents, diaries, letters, photographs, maps, newspapers, rare secondary sources, historical artifacts, and images of historic sites where some of the territorial confrontations occurred. Divided into five sections (Territorial Politics and Government, Border Warfare, Immigration and Early Settlement, Personalities, and National Debate about Kansas) each is searchable by keyword, author, and county. The topical sections are subdivided into relevant themes and include an introductory essay (between 1,000 and 2,000 words). Visitors will find essays on territorial politics, the rights of women and African Americans, military organizations, and free state and pro-slavery organizations. The Personalities section list 31 individuals, including John Brown and John Calhoun, and the final section presents both anti-slavery and pro-slavery perspectives of the national debate about Kansas. The site also includes a timeline with links and an annotated bibliography. An ongoing project, lesson plans are currently being added.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-01.

www.history
In Motion: The African-American Migration Experience
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.
See JAH web review by Clare Corbould.
Reviewed 2006-09-01.
This extensive, well-designed website features images, essays, lesson plans, and maps all focused on the movements of African Americans from the 1400s to the present. The site is built around the history of 13 African American migration experiences: the transatlantic slave trade (1450s-1867), runaway journeys (1630s-1865), the domestic slave trade (1760s-1865), colonization and emigration (1783–1910s), Haitian Immigration (1791–1809), Western migration (1840s-1970), Northern migration (1840s- 1890), the Great Migration (1916–1930), the Second Great Migration (1940–1970), Caribbean immigration (1900-present), the return South migration (1970-present), Haitian immigration in the 20th century (1970-present), and African immigration (1970-present). Each section includes an extensive image gallery with 60 or more images, two or more color maps and charts, an overview, short web essays on aspects of the migration with links to excerpts from various works on the subject, educational materials, a bibliography, and links to related websites. There are more than 67 detailed and informative color maps and more than 8,300 images available. Educational materials include at least two lesson plans (most have five or more) in each section and links to related resources. More than 90 lesson plans are available. An interactive timeline extends from the 15th to the 21st century and places migration in the context of U.S. history and the history of the African Diaspora. Searching is limited to a keyword search.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
Lakota Winter Counts
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
See JAH web review by Danielle Moretti-Langholtz and Buck Woodard.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
An exhibit displaying, explaining, and interpreting the Lakota pictorial histories known as winter counts. The website features a searchable database of winter count images, a documentary about Lakota history and culture, video interviews with Lakota people, and a teacher’s guide. (The exhibit requires Flash 6.0 but an html version is available.) Visitors can view images from 10 winter counts and examine their symbols in detail by year with curator comments on individual symbols. Visitors are also able to examine the various symbols used by the winter count keepers to represent plants and animals, ceremonies, health, trade goods, places, people, the U.S. government, and the sky. A second section of the site explains winter counts and the history of those Lakota who kept them for their bands. The “Who Are the Lakota” section offers a historical overview of Lakota history in 10 segments that include the Lakota and the Sioux people, Lakota origins, westward migration, horse-centered culture on the northern Great Plains, important conflicts and treaties, confinement to the Great Sioux Reservation, and subsequent land cessions. Additionally, six interviews with Lakota men and women offer contemporary perspectives. Finally, the teacher’s guide includes topics for discussion, an annotated bibliography with four books and six websites, and one lesson plan each for the elementary, middle-school, and high-school levels. In addition to highlighting the winter counts, this site is an outstanding resource for teaching and learning about the Lakota people and their culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-10-30.

www.history
Bound for Glory: America in Color, 1939–1943
Library of Congress.
This exhibition offers 70 color pictures taken by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information (FSA/OWI) between 1939 and 1943. This collection “reveals a surprisingly vibrant world that has typically been viewed only through black-and-white images. These vivid scenes and portraits capture the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations, the nation’s subsequent economic recovery and industrial growth, and the country’s great mobilization for World War II.” The collection features the work of famed photographers John Vachon, Jack Delano, Russell Lee, and Marion Post Wolcott. All pictures in the exhibition can be viewed in large format by clicking on the image or the title in the exhibition gallery. The collection is searchable by keyword. The complete collection of FSA/OWI photographs—171,000 black-and-white images and 1,602 color images—is available on the Library of Congress website at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/fsowhome.html. This collection is of interest to both those studying the history of American photography and those seeking images of New Deal-era America.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2005-11-30.

www.history
Poetic Waves: Angel Island
Garman Yip.
See JAH web review by Erika Lee.
Reviewed 2007-03-01.
This small, well-designed site uses a photo tour, profiles, poetry, a timeline, and an image gallery to present the compelling story of the 175,000 Asian immigrants who entered America between 1910 and 1940 through the Angel Island immigration station in California’s San Francisco Bay. Many of the immigrants were detained for up to two years at the station. The five-part tour provides an overview and a photographic and video tour of the station’s buildings and facilities, along with a description of its operations. “Poetry” allows visitors to listen to and read (in both English and Chinese) five of the many poems that Chinese immigrants carved into the walls of the station’s barracks. “People” uses text and audio to tell the individual stories of five immigrants. The timeline covers the history of Angel Island and Asian immigration from 1840 to the present. A small image gallery of 10 images includes an immigration document, building interiors, a page of interrogation notes, and an image of poetry on barrack walls. Although it offers few primary documents, this is a useful resource for those teaching the history of Asian immigration to America and is of interest to anyone wanting to learn more about the Chinese-American experience.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-11-06.

www.history
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers
Library of Congress and NEH.
See JAH web review by Kathryn Fuller-Seeley.
Reviewed 2008-09-01.
This website serves as a comprehensive resource for information on newspapers published in the United States from 1690 to the present. Its digital content comprises more than 680,000 individual newspaper page images drawn from close to 100 newspapers published in California, the District of Columbia, Florida, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Texas, Utah, and Virginia, between 1880 and 1910. Large cities are well-represented (for example, Washington D.C., and New York), as are medium-sized cities (Richmond, Virginia, and Louisville, Kentucky) and smaller towns (Berea, Kentucky). This content is fully keyword searchable, and search terms appear highlighted on each newspaper page. Newspaper pages can then be zoomed for detailed viewing and downloaded in high-quality .jpg or .pdf format. By 2011, the website plans to include newspaper page images dating back to 1836. The website also provides basic publication information about more than 11,500 newspapers published from 1690 to the present. This information includes date, place, and frequency of publication, as well as holdings information for researchers interested in visiting the libraries where these newspapers are kept. The database can be searched by keyword, language, ethnic audience, or labor focus (from “agricultural industries” to “woodworkers”).
Resources Available: TEXT.
Website last visited on 2008-11-01.

www.history
The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire
Bancroft Library, University of California .
Prepared for the 100th anniversary of the disaster, this exhibit and archive features an extensive collection of primary source material, an interactive map, and a 360-degree view of the damage to the city. The primary source material collection makes thousands of images and text files available, including more than 8,047 photographs, 29 broadsides, 528 cityscapes, 538 letters, 18 oral history texts, 161 periodical articles, 109 photomechanical prints, 272 reports, and more than 160 stereographs. Visitors can browse the archive by genre or subject or search by keyword, subject, genre, or geographic location. The exhibit has five galleries, each with several text/photograph displays: San Francisco before the fire, the earthquake, the fire, including a map showing burned districts, the story of refugees and survivors, and reconstruction. The interactive map divides San Francisco into 10 regions, each of which can be browsed or searched for images taken in that region. It also includes 11 aerial cityscape views. The 360-degree panoramic view of San Francisco shortly after the disaster is composed of eleven separate photographs taken from the roof of the Fairmont Hotel. Additionally, there is a bibliography with 32 books and scholarly articles and 8 links to related websites.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-07.

www.history
Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project
James N. Gregory, University of Washington.
See JAH web review by Peter Cole.
Reviewed 2009-03-01.
This collection of hundreds of primary sources documents the long history of struggle for equal rights by various ethnic group sin Seattle, including Filipino, Chinese, Japanese and Native Americans, Jews, Latinos, and African Americans. The website integrates labor rights movements with struggles for political rights, as is evident in “special sections” that highlight the Chicano/a movement, the Black Panther Party, Filipino Cannery Unionism, the United Construction Workers Association, Communism, and the United Farm Workers. Each section brings together oral histories, documents, newspapers, and photographs that are accompanied by written and video commentary to provide historical context. The collection of more than 70 oral histories of activists is especially useful for understanding the lived experience of racism and its especially subtle workings in the Pacific Northwest. Together, these resources provide important national context for the civil rights struggle, too often understood as a solely southern phenomenon.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2006-11-22.

www.history
Online Archive of California
University of California.
This impressive archive provides more than 81,000 images and 1,000 texts on the history and culture of California. Images may be searched by keyword or browsed according to six categories: history, nature, people, places, society, and technology. Topics include exploration, Indians, gold rushes, and California events. Three collections of texts are also available. Japanese American Relocation Digital Archive furnishes 309 documents and 67 oral histories. Free Speech Movement: Student Protest, U.C. Berkeley, 1964–1965 provides 541 documents, including books, letters, press releases, oral histories, photographs, and trial transcripts. UC Berkeley Regional Oral History Office offers full-text transcripts of 139 interviews organized into 14 topics including agriculture, arts, California government, society and family life, wine industry, disability rights, Earl Warren, Jewish community leaders, medicine (including AIDS), suffragists, and U.C. Black alumni.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-11-10.

www.history
Willa Cather Archive
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Center for Digital Research in the Humanities.
Willa Cather (1873–1947) wrote twelve novels and numerous works of short fiction. She won the Pulitzer Prize in 1923 and is known for her intensive examination of life in the mid-western U.S. This extensive archive is dedicated to her life and work. At its core is a collection of all of her novels, short fiction, journalistic writing, interviews, speeches, and public letters published before 1922. All materials are fully searchable. Notably, both O Pioneers! and My Antonia are accompanied by extensive scholarly notes, historical context, and introductory material. Accompanying her published materials is a collection of 2,054 of Cather’s letters (again annotated and fully searchable), more than 600 photographs of Cather and important people and places in her life, audio of Cather’s Pulitzer Prize acceptance speech, and a short video clip of Cather. The inclusion of many scholarly articles, a text analysis tool, and teaching resources serve to contextualize Cather’s work, and render this website useful for scholars, teachers, and the interested public.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2007-09-20.

www.history
Dime Novels and Penny Dreadfuls
Stanford University.
Presents more than 2,300 images of front and back covers as well as nine full-text selections of American “dime novels,” their British counterparts, the “penny dreadfuls,” and weekly story papers that flourished in the mid- to late-19th century. Contents selected from Stanford University’s Dime Novel and Story Paper Collection. The site offers three “guided tours”—consisting of selected images and essays of approximately 1,500 words each—on print processes; publishers, authors, and fictional heroes; and the entire Stanford Collection. The full-text selections include stories starring such heroes as Nick Carter, Buffalo Bill, Jesse James, Deadwood Dick, Fred Fearnot, and Calamity Jane. The site provides basic information on each title—a few sentences on plot and publishing history—and includes indexing according to various features: subject, genre, setting, intended audience age and gender, and type of graphic material. At present, searching functions are not available, but users may browse images by title and feature. Subject indexing of cover iconography is especially valuable as listings are organized according to depictions of ethnicity/nationality, occupation, types of places, types of sports and recreations, types of violence, and types of gestures and actions classified according to gender of character portrayed. Includes a 27-title bibliography and an annotated timeline. Very valuable for those studying 19th-century American popular culture.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2007-09-19.

www.history
Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project
Densho.
See JAH web review by Allan W. Austin.
Reviewed 2005-06-01.
Over 750 hours of video interviews and 10,000 historic images provide first-hand accounts of Japanese Americans unjustly incarcerated by the U.S. government during World War II. Densho uses the accounts of individuals to explore principles of democracy and to encourage tolerance and justice in situations when citizens and legal immigrants are confused with enemies. The website features “Sites of Shame,” an overview of all types of detention facilities that held Japanese Americans, and “Causes of the Incarceration,” an examination of four motivations for the forced removal. Other primary sources found on the site are newspaper accounts, government orders and historical photographs. Teacher resources include social studies lessons (grades 4–12) with multimedia materials and classroom activities. A terminology list and glossary; timeline; and web, printed, and video sources provide interested viewers with further avenues for exploring this significant historical event.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, VIDEO.
Website last visited on 2009-10-06.

www.history
Panoramic Maps, 1847–1929
American Memory, Library of Congress.
See JAH web review by Paula Petrik.
Reviewed 2001-06-01.
This site presents more than 1,000 original panoramic maps, “a popular cartographic form” during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The maps, often prepared for civic organizations, such as chambers of commerce and real estate agents to promote an area’s commercial potential, cover the contiguous 48 states and four Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Quebec between 1847 and 1929. While most of these maps were not drawn to scale, viewers can zoom in to find artists’ renderings of individual streets, buildings, and landscape features. The site also includes a 1,200-word history of panoramic mapping; a bibliography comprised of 24 titles; and background essays (1,000 words) and images relating to five prominent panoramic artists: Albert Ruger (1829–1899); Thadeus Mortimer Fowler (1842–1922); Oakley H. Bailey (1843–1947); Lucien R. Burleigh (1853–1923); and Henry Wellge (1850–1917). This site is an excellent resource for those studying urbanization, cities, business growth, and the art of mapmaking.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-08.

www.history
American History 102: Civil War to the Present
Stanley K. Schultz, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
This site reflects efforts to teach an American history survey course entirely through technology. Offers student lecture notes; 32 biographical sketches of prominent figures treated in the course, searchable by occupation, name, and era; bibliographic information; exams and review sheets; and a gallery of more than 200 photographs, many of which are taken from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin. The overall presentation is somewhat fragmented, but the site is rich in resources. Perhaps most valuable is a directory of history websites, organized by subject and time period. Professor Stanley Schultz and his associates have designed the site as a supplement for his videotaped lectures on the post-Civil War period.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES, AUDIO.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.

www.history
Map Collections: 1500–2003
American Memory, Library of Congress.
This site presents a large number of maps from the 16th century to the present day focusing on Americana and “cartographic treasures.” The materials are organized into seven thematic categories—“Cities and Towns”; “Conservation and Environment”; “Discovery and Exploration”; “Cultural Landscapes”; “Military Battles and Campaigns”; “Transportation and Communication”; and “General Maps.” Sections include a number of “special presentations,” including several essays ranging from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Users may zoom in to view details and download maps. 17 specific map collections contained within this larger site are described in detail in the following History Matters entries: “Discovery and Exploration”; “The American Revolution and Its Era”; “Railroad Maps, 1828–1900”; “American Colonization Society Collection: Maps of Liberia, 1830–1870”; “Panoramic Maps, 1847–1929”; “Civil War Maps”; and “Mapping the National Parks.”
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-06.

www.history
The Northern Great Plains, 1880–1920: Photographs from the Fred Hulstrand and F. A. Pazandak Photograph Collections
American Memory, Library of Congress and North Dakota State University.
Furnishes approximately 900 photographs from two collections at the Institute for Regional Studies at North Dakota State University. A professional photographer from northeastern North Dakota who sought to document the settlement of the Great Plains produced the “Fred Hulstrand History in Pictures Collection.” The “F. A. Pazandak Photography Collection” includes photographs taken by a southeastern North Dakota farmer as mechanization began to change his family farm. Images portray everyday rural and small town life, mostly from 1880–1920, and include shots of farmers, farm machinery, children, one-room schools, and workshops. The site also provides a historical overview of North Dakota, a 300-word history of farm machinery companies, and presentations entitled “Implements Used on the Farm,” “Schooling,” “Women,” “Sod Homes,” “Immigrants,” “Steam Engines and Tractors,” “Hired Hands,” and “Golden Age of Agriculture.” An annotated bibliography of 61 titles provides a guide for further research. This site includes important visual documentation on changes in rural communities and farming practices during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Resources Available: TEXT, IMAGES.
Website last visited on 2008-10-09.