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Date:         Mon, 1 Nov 1999 03:27:12 -0500
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         "Trevor Burnard, University of Canterbury, NZ"
              
Subject:      slavery and revolution

I agree with Ira Berlin's comments on the ambivalent effect of the
Revolution on slavery in the United States and agree that it did connect -
irrevocably - slavery within a larger debate over freedom in ways that had
not been so evident before the Revolution. But to my mind it was Britons
rather than Americans who most reconsidered the rightness of many forms of
unfreedom - not just slavery, although that was the most important
reconceptualisation, but also indentured servitude and convict terms - in
the era of the American Revolution. The loss of the American colonies was a
serious shock, as we know, to Britain and accentuated radical critiques of
Britain as the home of freedom. I don't think that it is any surprise that
the cause of antislavery was greatly advanced in the 1780s. I also think
that Britain embarked upon a series of radical, sometimes quixotic,
experiments in new types of colonisation that eschewed slavery in these
years. Alan Atkinson in his marvellous Europeans in Australia (OUP;
1997)discusses colonization schemes and British conceptions of unfreedom in
some detail and shows, very successfully in my opinion, that abortive
settlements in Honduras and Sierra Leone and eventually successful
settlements in what became Australia were predicated on a new assertion of
Country Whig ideology by major politicians such as Lord Sydney (named after
the great seventeenth century martyr to liberty). Sydney (Home Secretary
1783-89)believed that the empire had to be a medium for liberty and that
colonies had to be the creations of free men (even if these free men had
been convicts in Britain). Sydney's beliefs (and others like him ) were very
traditional, even backward, but they led to new models of colonisation and
employment of labour (especially in Australia which Atkinson argues to have
been a project of freedom more than a convict state) that differentiated the
second British Empire from the first. The British Empire was also changed by
the far greater attention paid in the 1780s and after to the status of
blacks within the empire. So, when looking at the effect of the Revolution
on slaveery I wwould urge people to look further than just the United States
and slavery; the effect was also important across the Atlantic (in France
even more than in Britain)and on a wide variety of forms of unfreedom.
Trevor Burnard
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Date:         Mon, 8 Nov 1999 12:57:59 -0500
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Deborah Barnes 
Subject:      Re: query before we start on 1 October
In-Reply-To:  
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Please unsubscribe me.

At 01:38 PM 9/29/99 -0400, you wrote:
>Dear colleagues,
>
>As the Talking History Forum coordinator, I would like to encourage
>student engagement with the discussion as long as the focus remains
>on the process of teaching and leaning about slavery.  Tracey's plan
>of asking students to submit their comments for review prior to
>posting sounds like a good strategy for teachers who want to use the
>forum as part of a course.  The issue of student participation in
>these forums has not been raised before.  I think the question of how
>these forums can be used in the classroom is a worthwhile topic for
>discussion, or in this case in a "pre-forum" discussion.
>
>Pennee Bender
>
>
>
>At 9:11 AM -0400 9/29/99, Rick Halpern wrote:
>>Will we open this discussion to our students, or is it meant for teachers?
>>I ask because I teach a year long documents-based course on slavery and
>>emancipation that has a significant computing/Internet component, and the
>>students might benefit from lurking around the edges of the slavery forum.
>>On the other hand, I know how annoying uninformed student participation can
>>be on some of the H-NET lists.
>>
>>BTW, those interested in our undergraduate courses with web sites can go
>>here for a browse:  http://www.ucl.ac.uk/history/courses
>>
>>Rick Halpern
>>University College London
>
>Pennee Bender
>Multi-Media Producer
>212/966-4248 ext. 215
>Fax -212/966-4589
>American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning
>Graduate School and University Center
>The City University of New York
>99 Hudson Street
>New York, NY 10013
>
>
Each one teach one,
Deborah H. Barnes
Associate Professor of English
Gettysburg College
(717) 337-6759
dbarnes@gettysburg.edu
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 9 Nov 1999 15:12:36 EST
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Funmi Kennedy 
Subject:      Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Ms. Blanchard:

I am involved in developing a conference on the Underground Railroad which
will take place at Lincoln Unniversity in August, 2000. We are currently
looking for scholars who might be interested in telling the story from an
African-American point of view to aide in the development of the Heritage
Tourisim Industry for the state of Pennsylvania.

If you would be interested, please contact me.
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 9 Nov 1999 20:35:12 GMT
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Victor Blue 
Subject:      CFP: Blacks in the Diaspora Student Academic Conference
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

CALL FOR PAPERS
2000 BLACKS IN THE DIASPORA STUDENT ACADEMIC CONFERENCE
March 17-March 18, 2000
Tate-Turner-Kuralt Building
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

DEADLINE: January 31, 2000

The Sixth Annual Blacks in the Diaspora Student Academic Conference is the
culmination of The Blacks in the Diaspora Lecture series, the oldest
programming component of the Sonja Haynes Stone Black Cultural Center.  Each
semester, faculty present lectures about their specialized research
interests. Lectures consist of a presentation of scholarly research on
social, economic and political issues affecting the African American
community.  Presenters introduce topics that increase cultural understanding
and promote constructive dialogues.  This series is dedicated to serious
academic investigation of the struggles and triumphs of people of African
descent.

The goal of the Blacks in the Diaspora Student Academic conference is to
induct rising scholars into the process of presenting their research to a
broad academic audience in the tradition of The Blacks in the Diaspora
Lecture Series.  Toward this end, the Institute aims not only to provide a
forum for interdisciplinary discourses on race, but also to provide support
to young scholars throughout their creative processes.

Dr. Robin D.G. Kelley, professor of history at New York University will be
this year’s keynote speaker.

This two-day conference will be hosted by Professor Harry Amana, with
individual sessions facilitated by UNC graduate students.

There will be a $400 prize awarded for the best graduate paper/presentation
and a $200 prize awarded to the best undergraduate paper/presentation.

PAPER SUBMISSIONS:
Please observe the following guidelines:
1) Submit one copy of the paper (only completed papers will be considered)
2) Attach a cover sheet giving paper title, authorship, institutional
affiliation, address, email address and telephone number
3) Include a 50-100 word abstract
4) Include a brief biography
5) Specify any technical requirements

PANEL, PERFORMANCE OR PROGRAM PROPOSAL:
Please observe the following guidelines:
1) All proposals should contain a title, statement of purpose, rationale,
names of consenting participants including the organizer and chair, their
institutional addresses, fax, e-mail, and phone numbers, titles and brief
descriptions of each paper.
2) Specify any technical requirements
3) Include a brief biography of each participant

All submissions should be mailed to:

Institute of African American Research
Blacks in the Diaspora Student Academic conference
134 ˝ E. Franklin Street, CB# 3393
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3393

For general questions concerning the conference contact:
Victor E. Blue at 919/962-6810 or via email at zuumbi@unc.edu.

Thank you for your interest.



______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
=========================================================================
Date:         Tue, 9 Nov 1999 15:47:55 EST
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Funmi Kennedy 
Subject:      Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Just a little note.
It was not until 1787 the Quaker Yearly meeting finally agreeded slaverly
should no longer be an accceptable aveune to labor issues.
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 10 Nov 1999 08:57:10 +0100
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Loni Bramson-Lerche 
Subject:      URLs
In-Reply-To:  <199911100452.FAA21477@ping3.ping.be>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear All,

Yesterday I managed to delete all my bookmarks.  Of course, that was the
only thing that I had never backed up!

Some of my more recent ones came from this list.  I would be grateful if
those of you who might take pity on a wiser me would privately email me
their favorite history or women's studies URLs.  I am mostly interested in
academic ones, but not exclusively.

Many thanks,

Loni Bramson
=========================================================================
Date:         Wed, 17 Nov 1999 08:44:44 -0900
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Joan Beaubian 
Subject:      Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello,
The New Bedford(Mass) Historical Society has just sponsored a weekend
conference on the Underground Railroad that was attended by scholars and
historians  researching  the moveement in New England....There was  a
similar "Gathering" in Boston and Philadelphia co-sponsored by the National
Park Service. I can supply the names of people and organizations across the
country that are currently working on a major project.

Joan Beaubian
Vice President
New Bedford Historical Society
21 Seventh Street
New Bedford, Ma.02740
508-979-8828
-----Original Message-----
From: Funmi Kennedy 
To: SLAVERYFORUM@ASHP.LISTSERV.CUNY.EDU

Date: Tuesday, November 09, 1999 11:22 AM
Subject: Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese


>Dear Ms. Blanchard:
>
>I am involved in developing a conference on the Underground Railroad which
>will take place at Lincoln Unniversity in August, 2000. We are currently
>looking for scholars who might be interested in telling the story from an
>African-American point of view to aide in the development of the Heritage
>Tourisim Industry for the state of Pennsylvania.
>
>If you would be interested, please contact me.
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 22 Nov 1999 12:49:45 EST
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Funmi Kennedy 
Subject:      Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I would be very interested in any names of people who are working on
interperting the underground railroad time peroid. I attended the "
Philadelphia Gathering "  sponsored by the NPS.

I am searching for people and resources who can talk or provide information
from an African-American perspective.
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 22 Nov 1999 16:53:21 -0900
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Joan Beaubian 
Subject:      Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello,
If you attended this Gathering..you met Tara Morrison from the Boston
African American Meeting House. She has been named Regional Coordinator of
the Underground Railroad initiative for the National Park Service...She
probably has a list  that includes Northeast Region and the addresses of the
regional co-ordinators of the other regions.
I was going to ask her to send them to you...but it would be better if you
ask he..since you have already attended a NPS sponsored conference. Her
address is Tara_Morrison@nps.gov
I certainly hope to meet you one of these days...I travel to most of the NPS
sponsored workshops....
Let me know if I can give you any other help.
Joan Beaubian
New Bedford Historical Society
New Bedford, Ma.
-----Original Message-----
From: Funmi Kennedy 
To: SLAVERYFORUM@ASHP.LISTSERV.CUNY.EDU

Date: Monday, November 22, 1999 8:49 AM
Subject: Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese


>I would be very interested in any names of people who are working on
>interperting the underground railroad time peroid. I attended the "
>Philadelphia Gathering "  sponsored by the NPS.
>
>I am searching for people and resources who can talk or provide information
>from an African-American perspective.
>
=========================================================================
Date:         Mon, 22 Nov 1999 20:02:02 -0900
Reply-To:     FORUM ON SLAVERY 
Sender:       FORUM ON SLAVERY 
From:         Joan Beaubian 
Subject:      Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello again,
I was just  looking over my list of people that I could share with you and I
have YOUR card......We met in Memphis...
I also have your pamphlet " Living the Experience" SMALL WORLD!!!
I am a heavy set African American  woman -middle aged and I have light
colored hair...Remember me???

-----Original Message-----
From: Funmi Kennedy 
To: SLAVERYFORUM@ASHP.LISTSERV.CUNY.EDU

Date: Monday, November 22, 1999 8:49 AM
Subject: Re: Slavery under the Spanish and portuguese


>I would be very interested in any names of people who are working on
>interperting the underground railroad time peroid. I attended the "
>Philadelphia Gathering "  sponsored by the NPS.
>
>I am searching for people and resources who can talk or provide information
>from an African-American perspective.
>